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October 22, 2014

Quote of the day:
“We are what we pretend to be, so we must be careful what we pretend to be.”
Kurt Vonnegut

U. of I. closer to choosing president (Chicago Tribune)
University of Illinois trustees are on track to choose the university's next president by the end of the semester, possibly as early as next month.

As overtesting outcry grows, education leaders pull back on standardized tests (Christian Science Monitor)
As the outcry against the overtesting of American children has grown, state and local education leaders – in a move endorsed by President Barack Obama – have announced a new focus on dialing back the volume of standardized testing and dialing up the quality.

What Really Happens at Community Colleges? A Tool Taps Data for Answers (Chronicle of Higher Education)
How do community-college students move from their first class to their first job?

Toni Morrison’s Papers to be Housed at Princeton University (Diverse Issues in Higher Education)
The papers of Nobel laureate Toni Morrison will be housed in a permanent library collection at Princeton University, according to the university’s president, Dr. Christopher L. Eisgruber.

Colleges Find Success With New Approaches to Developmental Education (Diverse Issues in Higher Education)
Every year, thousands of adults, some high school graduates, apply to a community college. But first they have to take tests that assess their English and math skills. Nationwide, 60 percent fail at least one of the tests, according to the Community College Research Center.

Four Universities in Running for Obama Presidential Library (Diverse Issues in Higher Education)
The field of institutions vying to become the host site of the Barack Obama Presidential Library has been narrowed from 13 applicants to four finalists. The finalists selected by The Barack Obama Foundation are the University of Chicago, the University of Illinois at Chicago, Columbia University, and the University of Hawaii.

Steep Drops Seen in Teacher-Prep Enrollment Numbers (Education Week)
Fresh from the United States Air Force, Zachary Branson, 33, wanted a career with a structured day and hours that would allow him to be home in time to watch his kids in the evening.

OPINION - When Is It Worth It To Drop Out Of College? (Forbes)
Want to set off a firestorm of a debate? Ask one simple question: “Is college really worth it?”

Technology’s impact on higher education (Green Bay Press Gazette)
For anyone who has children in school — regardless of whether they are in elementary school or in college — it seems abundantly clear that technology is changing the way teachers teach and students learn.

Variety is spice of Hispanic heritage celebrations at Millikin (Herald & Review)
When Millikin University student Dorian Holland sat down to eat the food specially prepared by the Millikin dining department, he didn't know his rice, burrito and fish were foods often served in Latin American countries.

Final pieces of Millikin admin team in place (Herald & Review)
With the appointment of Sarah Shupenus as Millikin University's new vice president for enrollment and marketing, Patrick White has his administrative team in place one year after his appointment as the university's 15th president.

Benefits of Free (Inside Higher Ed)
The concept of tuition-free community college is picking up steam. Chicago this month followed Tennessee with the creation of a new community-college scholarship for high school graduates.

Reverse Transfer Project from Clearinghouse (Inside Higher Ed)
As many as two million students could earn associate degrees through the project, according to the Clearinghouse.

Alum wants the world to know about UI contributions to everyday life (News-Gazette)
What do forced-air heating, the plasma screen and aerosol whipped cream have in common?

How will election impact UI Board of Trustees? (News-Gazette)
In the span of a little over a month, the University of Illinois could see sweeping changes in its top leadership. Or maybe not.

Loudest are not the largest (News-Gazette)
After being pilloried for weeks, Chancellor Phyllis Wise wins one.

A new course for college leadership (POLITICO)
Susan Herbst is the first woman to serve as president of the University of Connecticut, the state’s flagship research institution founded in 1881, but she doesn’t consider herself a trailblazer.

For-profit colleges get harsh grades by former students (The Boston Globe)
The pitch made by for-profit colleges, a staple of daytime and late-night TV, often features successful alumni from the schools, from Pulitzer Prize-winning photographers to Hollywood animators. Yet the US Department of Education estimated that 72 percent of the for-profit programs at 7,000 schools produced graduates who on average earned less than high school dropouts.

More AP courses slated for major overhaul (The Hechinger Report)
Despite the recent fallout over new guidelines for Advanced Placement U.S. History, the College Board is making similar changes to most science and history AP courses in an effort to emphasize critical thinking.

Nation’s Wealthy Places Pour Private Money Into Public Schools, Study Finds (The New York Times)
From bake sales to gala auctions, private groups are raising an increasing amount of money for public schools in wealthier communities, highlighting concerns about inequality.

Ebola Prompts Universities to Tighten Travel Rules (The New York Times)
Many universities have begun to tighten restrictions on travel to the countries hit hardest by the Ebola epidemic, even for professors doing humanitarian work.

Where Young College Graduates Are Choosing to Live (The New York Times)
When young college graduates decide where to move, they are not just looking at the usual suspects, like New York, Washington and San Francisco.

100 students start college. Who graduates (The Washington Post)
A college degree is a near-requirement for students to build a life in the middle class, but whether or not students graduate often depends on their family income when they start school.

Animal Therapy May Reduce Anxiety, Loneliness Symptoms in College Students (University Herald)
Animal-assisted therapy reduces symptoms of anxiety and loneliness among college students, according to a recent study.

Bullying not a thing of the past for college students (USA TODAY)
Bullying comes in all forms but is usually thought of as a K-12 issue that ceases to exist once students head off to college.

October 21, 2014

Quote of the day:
"You can lead a man to Congress, but you can’t make him think.”
Milton Berle

Measuring Humanities Degrees Misses Much of Their Value (Chronicle of Higher Education)
Plenty of people know how much they paid for their college degree. Fewer can tell you what it’s actually worth.

‘Reverse Transfer’ Project Aims to Ease the Way to Associate Degrees (Chronicle of Higher Education)
A new project from the National Student Clearinghouse will aim to provide an automated way for students who transfer from two-year institutions to four-year institutions to receive associate degrees.

Teaching and the University of Tomorrow (Chronicle of Higher Education)
Last week, I attended the De Lange Conference held at Rice University every other year, this time on “Teaching in the University of Tomorrow.” - See more at: https://chroniclevitae.com/news/768-teaching-and-the-university-of-tomorrow#sthash.auZoOL5z.dpuf

Higher-Ed Reform or Drinking Game? You Decide. (Chronicle of Higher Education)
"Because each course in General Studies has been approved to meet specific learning outcomes associated with the General Studies curriculum, the course student learning outcomes listed on the syllabus must include learning outcomes that align with the identified General Studies learning outcomes and include assignments that will serve as embedded assessments for these learning outcomes.

Seeking Hip Worker Environs, Universities Remake Research Parks (Chronicle of Higher Education)
Research Triangle Park, the king of university-affiliated business development, is 11 square miles of North Carolina pine forest laced with blue-chip tenants that include IBM, Monsanto, Cisco Systems, and Dupont.

Universities Curtail Health Experts’ Efforts to Work on Ebola in West Africa (Chronicle of Higher Education)
Tough new restrictions on travel to Ebola-ravaged countries, including a flurry of bans announced in the past several days, by the State University of New York and other groups, have some infectious-disease experts, on campuses and off, worried.

Public-College Leaders Rail Against Education Dept.’s ‘Regulatory Culture’ (Chronicle of Higher Education)
Ted Mitchell, under secretary of education, began his speech to a roomful of higher-education leaders on Monday with a conciliatory tone, stressing that the U.S. Department of Education shared a goal with them of serving the public good.

Northwestern, U of C among four hospitals that would treat Ebola patients (Crain's Chicago Business)
Four prominent Chicago hospitals, including Northwestern Memorial Hospital downtown and the University of Chicago Medical Center on the South Side, have agreed to take on patients stricken with Ebola.

State Lottery Funds May Not Help Those Who Need it Most (Diverse Issues in Higher Education)
When it comes to using state lottery funds to finance scholarships for college, the idea that gambling proceeds are helping the poor pay for their education makes the state-sanctioned games of chance more acceptable than they might otherwise be.

Going to the Extreme With College Dropouts (Diverse Issues in Higher Education)
Richard Vedder, who teaches at Ohio University and is an adjunct scholar at the conservative American Enterprise Institute, thinks adjuncts are the dalit—the modern Indian term for “untouchables.”

Student Loans and Political Ads (Inside Higher Ed)
As Democrats look to keep control of the U.S. Senate and hold on to House seats, they are continuing to raise student loans as an issue in this fall's election.

Caution urged after string of on-campus U of I attacks (Springfield State Journal-Register)
Champaign and University of Illinois police are urging people to travel in pairs following a string of attacks on campus. Read more: http://www.sj-r.com/article/20141021/News/141029924#ixzz3GnJ9bIGF

Illinois' top educator: Funding problems to remain (St. Louis Post-Dispatch)
The Illinois state superintendent of schools says the outcome of the governor's race won't make a difference for the state's education funding problems.

OpEd: Higher Education and the Public Good (The Huffington Post)
The benefits that higher education bestows on individuals are well-known. In some circles, these personal benefits are as easily recited as the Pledge of Allegiance: College graduates are more likely to be employed and will earn more money over their lifetimes than those who do not have college education;

The Compelling Need to Improve the Higher Education Value Equation (The Huffington Post)
In the middle 90's, "value" was the hot new word and every business was trying to improve its value equation -- which we operationally define as "outcomes divided by cost."

A College Financial Aid Guide for Families Who Have Saved Nothing (The New York Times)
A mother of five children in Bath, Me., admitted on the New York Times’s Motherlode blog earlier this year that she and her husband had no college savings.

In New York, Vocational Skills Could Count Toward Diploma (The New York Times)
The New York State Board of Regents gave initial approval to a major change to high school graduation requirements on Monday, allowing students to earn their diplomas with one fewer test if they pass another assessment in a range of subjects like languages, the arts, hospitality management and carpentry.

SIU investigating reported sexual assault (The Southern Illinoisan)
Another report of sexual assault is under investigation on the campus of SIU, and three male students have been placed on interim separation from the university

Why poor kids don’t stay in college (The Washington Post)
It is a Tuesday in October and Terrell Kellam is running late. He usually wakes up at 5:30 a.m. to catch the first of two buses that will take him from southwest Baltimore to Morgan State University, just north of the city

October 20, 2014

Quote of the day:
“Associate with men of good quality if you esteem your own reputation; for it is better to be alone than in bad company.”
George Washington

Editorial: Raise taxes or else … (Belleville News-Democrat)
Southwestern Illinois College expects to raise property taxes, and the explanation from school leaders is that the state makes them do it. SWIC would risk losing state equalization funding of about $7.5 million a year if it doesn't levy at least 95 percent of the maximum property tax rate, a spokesman said. Read more here: http://www.bnd.com/2014/10/17/3460891/raise-taxes-or-else.html?sp=/99/174/668/#storylink=cpy

A Test Case for Sexual Harassment (Chronicle of Higher Education)
Philosophy professors at the University of Colorado’s flagship campus here thought they were taking a bold step.

In Rules on Campus Sexual Violence, Education Dept. Emphasizes Training (Chronicle of Higher Education)
New federal rules issued on Monday aim to make campuses safer by requiring colleges to train students and employees on preventing sexual assault, dating violence, domestic violence, and stalking.

Benchmark Survey Finds a Continued Rise in Giving to Colleges (Chronicle of Higher Education)
Wall Street may have had a rough spell recently, but longer-term growth in the national economy and strong gains in the stock market drove fund-raising gains last year at universities and colleges across the country.

Speed Kills (Chronicle of Higher Education)
"Sleeker. Faster. More Intuitive" (The New York Times); "Welcome to a world where speed is everything" (Verizon FiOS); "Speed is God, and time is the devil" (chief of Hitachi’s portable-computer division).

State slashes prices to revive College Illinois contract sales (Crain's Chicago Business)
The state agency overseeing College Illinois is taking a time-tested approach to reviving interest in the college savings plan: It's slashing prices.

Harper College recognizes Hanover Park mayor, other alumni (Daily Herald)
Hanover Park Mayor Rodney Craig will join seven other honorees in a Harper College ceremony recognizing alumni for their career and community impact on Wednesday, Oct. 29.

Kin of black classmates visit Illinois college (Daily Herald)
Willie Sue Smith Stewart's connection to Eureka started well before she came for college in fall 1928 -- the same year as Ronald Reagan.

Annual growth conference focuses on future jobs (Daily Herald)
Grundy County’s manufacturing, agriculture, logistics and health care industries are projected to expand in coming years, remaining the prominent areas of employment for local workers.

Diverse Conversations: Staying for the Long Haul (Diverse Issues in Higher Education)
In higher education, things are constantly changing. This is especially true of college administrators, who rarely stay at the same institution for an extended period of time.

Final Changes to Clery Act (Inside Higher Ed)
The U.S. Department of Education published the final rules to carry out changes to the Clery Act today, requiring colleges and universities to collect and disclose crime statistics about the number of reported crimes that were investigated and determined to be unfounded.

A 'Partial Win' for Publishers (Inside Higher Ed)
While academic publishers on Friday notched a rare win in the ongoing legal debate about digital access to copyrighted works, proponents of fair use said the opinion in Cambridge v. Patton recognizes that colleges and universities can legally create digital reserves of books in their collections.

How will election impact UI Board of Trustees? (News-Gazette)
In the span of a little over a month, the University of Illinois could see sweeping changes in its top leadership. Or maybe not.

Terrific students can be found anywhere’: (PBS NewsHour)
The U.S. Department of Education recently released data that showed there were more than 1.2 million homeless students enrolled in public schools last year, the highest ever.

ICC tuition focused on by network (Pekin Daily Times)
The Pathways to Prosperity Network seeks to ensure youth complete high school and obtain a post-secondary education with value in the labor market. Read more: http://www.pekintimes.com/article/20141017/News/141019180#ixzz3GhBtebbX

Tally of federal probes of colleges on sexual violence grows 50 percent since May (The Washington Post)
The number of federal investigations into how colleges handle sexual violence reports has jumped 50 percent in the past six months, reflecting a surge of recent discrimination claims and the difficulty of resolving high-profile cases that often drag on for years.

October 16, 2014

Quote of the day:
“Nurture your minds with great thoughts. To believe in the heroic makes heroes.”
Benjamin Disraeli

Why one college president took a $90,000 annual pay cut (Christian Science Monitor)
Kentucky State University interim president Raymond Burse took a major pay cut, then boosted the pay of university minimum wage workers. He's not alone in taking a pay cut. What's behind these moves?

State report cards coming Oct. 31, with some changes (Daily Herald)
Later this month, the Illinois State Board of Education will release its annual set of data that measures how well students and schools are performing, but several new metrics will help parents and community members better analyze the numbers.

Benefits of Free (Inside Higher Ed)
The concept of tuition-free community college is picking up steam. Chicago this month followed Tennessee with the creation of a new community-college scholarship for high school graduates.

Federal Policy and the Skills Gap (Inside Higher Ed)
The relationship between federal policy and the skills gap is misunderstood, according to a new report from the New America Foundation.

A New Credential For The Tech Industry (NPR)
A leader in the small but growing industry of "coder boot camps" announced plans today to develop a new set of credentials aimed at certifying the skills these programs teach.

Some Harvard Professors Oppose Policy on Assaults (The New York Times)
Dozens of Harvard Law School faculty members are asking the university to withdraw its new sexual misconduct policy, saying that it violates basic principles of fairness and would do more harm than good.

SIU releases 2013 crime statistics (The Southern Illinoisan)
SIU released its 2013 crime statistics, showing marked decreases in robberies and burglaries and sharp increases in liquor and drug law violations.

Durbin said for-profit schools hurting SIU (The Southern Illinoisan)
U.S. Sen. Dick Durbin said for-profit schools such as the University of Phoenix and DeVry University are challenging the county’s public universities including Southern Illinois University Carbondale

Ebola could test college commitments to international academic exchange (The Washington Post)
U.S. colleges and universities have long prided themselves on an open-door policy that encourages enrollment of international students. Their commitment to that principle might get tested in coming months as the deadly Ebola virus ravages three west African nations.

October 15, 2014

Quote of the day:
"Am I not destroying my enemies when I make friends of them?"
Abraham Lincoln

The Ph.D. Student's Ticking Clock (Chronicle of Higher Education)
The bill wasn’t that much as far as medical tabs go: $3,274. But when Robyn Schroeder learned that her Brown University health insurance would not cover the cost to remove three wisdom teeth, it set off what she calls her "odyssey of various jobs."

Booth to partner with U of I engineering (Crain's Chicago Business)
The University of Chicago's Booth School of Business is looking south for the next big thing — way south. Booth is partnering with University of Illinois College of Engineering in Urbana-Champaign to bring students from both schools together to work on startups.

Illinois employers post 212,000 job ads in September (Daily Herald)
Illinois businesses placed more than 212,000 "help wanted" ads online in September. Most of the ads were seeking full-time workers.

Benefits of Redefining Full-time Enrollment to 15 Credits a Semester Examined (Diverse Issues in Higher Education)
Even though Austin Sellers was considered a full-time student at the University of Wisconsin—Milwaukee, no one ever pointed out that his course load of 12 credits per semester would essentially force him to spend five years to earn a four-year degree.

Plan to Have College Enrollment Reflect Population Growth a Texas-Sized Success (Diverse Issues in Higher Education)
When the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board discovered through a study in 2000 that the state would lose tax revenue and see a drop in income because its colleges and universities weren’t keeping pace with population growth, it took action with the Closing the Gaps plan.

Foreign Students and the U.S. Higher Education Admissions Market (Diverse Issues in Higher Education)
Let’s assume that a Chinese family, anxious to provide their child with a world-class education, searches the web to determine where to start.

Identifying The Worst Colleges In America (NPR)
For years,Washington Monthly has been rating and ranking the nation's colleges.

Former President Carter still hopes for Israeli-Palestinian peace (Springfield State Journal-Register)
Former President Jimmy Carter said he still believes there can be a peaceful two-state solution to the conflict between Israel and the Palestinians, and he wants the United States to re-energize its push for peace there after the mid-term elections in November. Read more: http://www.sj-r.com/article/20141014/News/141019727#ixzz3GEC5Vd99

Students gather to learn about life after high school (Springfield State Journal-Register)
It’s never too early to start thinking about college, 11-year-old Daniel McClung thought to himself three years ago. Read more: http://www.sj-r.com/article/20141014/News/141019713#ixzz3GEELDyb2

Chicago: Free tuition for college-ready students (The Hechinger Report)
College-ready students will get a free ride to the City Colleges of Chicago‘s seven campuses, reports the Chicago Tribune.

Liberals and Affirmative Consent (The New York Times)
It’s been fascinating to follow the various interventions, pro and con, surrounding the new “affirmative consent” standard for sexual assault on California’s college campuses and the collegiate approach to adjudicating rape allegations generally.

OpEd: Yes Means Yes: The Big Consent Debate (The New York Times)
The debate about rape culture and consent in sexual intercourse has spread from college campuses to the front pages of national media, and even to state legislatures.

SIU Interim Chancellor Sarvela diagnosed with treatable carcinoma (The Southern Illinoisan)
CARBONDALE -- SIU Interim Chancellor Paul Sarvela has been diagnosed with a treatable form of cancer.

What to Know if Your College Loses Federal Funding (U.S. News & World Report)
Here's the good news: A greater percentage of students are repaying their federal loans

October 14, 2014

Quote of the day:
If you want others to be happy, practice compassion. If you want to be happy, practice compassion.
The Dalai Lama

Police investigates assaults at U. of Illinois (Bloomington Pantagraph)
Champaign police say they are investigating a string of assaults on the University of Illinois campus that left four people injured.

Some U of I faculty remain angry over professor (Bloomington Pantagraph)
Some members of the faculty at the University of Illinois say they remain angry over the decision not to hire a professor because of his profane, anti-Israel Twitter messages.

Commentary: Get government out of student loans (Chicago Tribune)
Yesenia Duarte's parents are Mexican immigrants. Her family works long hours in construction and at a factory to make ends meet.. At an early age, Duarte set her sights on college. But come enrollment time, she faced a dilemma: either sign up for thousands of dollars in student loans or give up her dream of a college degree.

No more B-list applicants at U. of I. for Illinoisans (Chicago Tribune)
he University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign has changed its admissions system with the hope that no more students will feel like B-list applicants, invited to join the class only after getting a second look..

The U. of Texas Tracks What Its Graduates Earn. It Thinks You Should, Too. (Chronicle of Higher Education)
Representatives of the University of Texas system came to town last week, touting an online data tool that shows the salaries of the universities’ graduates.

Jimmy Carter set to speak at Illinois College (Daily Herald)
Former President Jimmy Carter is scheduled to speak about a Middle East peace initiative at Illinois College.

U. of Illinois plans center focused on gene data (Daily Herald)
The University of Illinois and the Mayo Clinic will use a $9.3 million federal grant to set up a new research center focused on data analysis and health care.

Durbin presses for closing of 'skills gap' (Daily Herald)
U.S. Sen. Dick Durbin plans to use a southwestern Illinois trade school as a backdrop to push for legislation that promotes technical job training. The lack of such training has opened a skills gap that means good jobs are going unfilled because of a lack of qualified candidates.

New Data on Transition from High School to College (Inside Higher Ed)
The National Student Clearinghouse on Tuesday released a broad data set on students' transition from high school to college.

Lake Board sees downed enrollment, looks to hire marketing consultant (Journal Gazette & Times-Courier)
Enrollment at Lake Land College is down 5.7 percent this year, but college trustees say they are hopeful new initiatives will help turn around numbers for future semesters. During Monday's board of trustees meeting, Tina Stovall, Vice President for Student Services, said the focus will continue be set on recruiting new students,…

MCC receives audit; considers bachelor degree programs (Sun Publications)
The McHenry County College Board of Trustees received a positive audit Monday and a glimpse of potential future budgets with a decision on the tax levy looming.

College completion is the best default aversion (The Hill)
In many cases, the real reason that borrowers default on their loans is that they're the ones who didn't obtain any credential at all. With no degree to fall back on, finding a job that allows borrowers to repay their loans is no simple task.

Web-Era Trade Schools, Feeding a Need for Code (The New York Times)
A new educational institution, the coding boot camp, is quietly emerging as the vocational school for the digital age, devoted to creating software developers.

Where America’s college grads are moving (The Washington Post)
The economic rationale for a city is that commerce just works better when people are close together. Hiring and firing is more efficient; so is the exchange of ideas.

October 13, 2014

Quote of the day:
"Whatever you're going through people, don't let it hold you down or let it govern the goodness in you. Stay Positive and Strong."
Ritu Ghatourey

Goals for Enrollment and Tuition Revenue Elude Many Colleges (Chronicle of Higher Education)
As far back as January, Stevenson University’s enrollment models and consultants were sending warning signals about the fall—that retention would go down, that students’ family incomes were probably hurting, that the applications streaming in might not produce students in the flesh.

Goals for Enrollment and Tuition Revenue Elude Many Colleges (Chronicle of Higher Education)
As far back as January, Stevenson University’s enrollment models and consultants were sending warning signals about the fall—that retention would go down, that students’ family incomes were probably hurting, that the applications streaming in might not produce students in the flesh.

The Liar's 'Tell' (Chronicle of Higher Education)
Paul Ekman has spent much of his long career studying emotions as expressed on the face.

Wikipedia, a Professor's Best Friend (Chronicle of Higher Education)
Michael Gorman, a former president of the American Library Association, wrote some years ago that "a professor who encourages the use of Wikipedia is the intellectual equivalent of a dietitian who recommends a steady diet of Big Macs with everything."

The Science of Us (Chronicle of Higher Education)
A sergeant in the city police force was worried about rising ethnic tensions.

Big-Data Doubts (Chronicle of Higher Education)
As you may have noticed, Big Data is, well, big.

U of I fraternity will remain open despite suspension (Daily Herald)
The CEO of the Alpha Tau Omega National Fraternity says the University of Illinois chapter will remain active even though it was suspended by the university.

ECC breaks ground on training center for police, firefighters (Daily Herald)
Elgin Community College broke ground this week on a new Public Safety Training Center in Burlington.

CLC hosts Engineering night Oct. 16 (Daily Herald)
College of Lake County will host its annual Engineering Night on Thursday, Oct. 16. The event is geared for those who wish to learn about careers in engineering and meet with representatives from area engineering schools.

Educators Gather to Take Global Look at Underrepresented Student Issues (Diverse Issues in Higher Education)
Determined to build a strong international network among themselves, more than 50 educators from across the globe converged on this small European city this week to strategize over how best to support students operating at the margins.

College Campus Incidents Undermine Claims of ‘Post-Racial’ America (Diverse Issues in Higher Education)
The recent vandalism of a Jewish fraternity house at Emory University—the latest in a trend of similar incidents on college campuses across the country—has again called to question the idea that America has achieved a post-racial society.

Shift from Boutique Programs to Broad Efforts to Help Minority Males (Diverse Issues in Higher Education)
Community colleges are looking at addressing the achievement gaps of the men of color they enroll with broad, data-backed approaches to helping all students succeed and complete their academic programs.

Tennessee Promise Program Has 35K Applications (Diverse Issues in Higher Education)
With the Nov. 1 deadline to apply approaching, the Tennessee Promise program could be on pace to perhaps double the state’s goal of applications.

A Glimpse Into the Lives of Undocumented Students (Diverse Issues in Higher Education)
I was super involved in high school. I was in everything that I could be in because I thought it would help me get to where I wanted to be and go to a great school and do all these wonderful things.

Transition to real world proves challenging for graduates (Herald & Review)
Shocking a room full of educators Thursday was a story of a college graduate with a business degree and 3.9 GPA who lived at home with parents and worked in a job paying less than $20,000 a year.

The Costs of Free (Inside Higher Ed)
Several states have explored the possibility of so-called “free community college” programs, which would cover the cost of tuition and fees for recent high school graduates who meet certain other eligibility criteria.

'Prescription for disaster' (News-Gazette)
URBANA — In the fall of 1968, 565 students arrived on the University of Illinois campus as part of Project 500, an initiative to boost enrollment of African-Americans at the state's flagship university.

Op-ed:The decline of African-American students at UIUC (News-Gazette)
Here is an issue that Pat Quinn and Bruce Rauner won’t be talking about: The historic decline of African-American students at the University of Illinois at Champaign-Urbana, the state’s flag-ship public university.

'Prescription for disaster' (News-Gazette)
In the fall of 1968, 565 students arrived on the University of Illinois campus as part of Project 500, an initiative to boost enrollment of African-Americans at the state's flagship university.

How College Students Battled Textbook Publishers To A Draw, In 3 Graphs (NPR)
College textbooks are expensive. You probably already know this. A new biology or economics book can cost $300

U of I honors LED inventor bypassed by Nobel (Springfield State Journal-Register)
Colleagues have honored a retired University of Illinois professor they say deserved to win a Nobel Prize for inventing the first light-emitting diode, or LED. Read more: http://www.sj-r.com/article/20141011/News/141019888#ixzz3G25fQ41V

Former President Carter speaks Tuesday at Illinois College (Springfield State Journal-Register)
Former President Jimmy Carter will discuss a Middle East peace initiative Tuesday when he visits Illinois College.

Education Justice Project hosts symposium on higher education in prison (The Daily Illini)
The Education Justice Project is hosting a symposium on higher education programs in prison until Sunday.

Plagiarism Costs Degree for Senator John Walsh (The New York Times)
The Army War College rescinded the master’s degree of Senator John E. Walsh on Friday, determining that Mr. Walsh, a Montana Democrat, plagiarized his final paper there in 2007.

Giving Back to Your School in a Meaningful Way (The New York Times)
A FEW weeks ago, James. R. Hodge, president of Permal Asset Management, stood in front of a new building for Indiana University’s undergraduate business students that bore his name: Hodge Hall. It’s a grand, limestone building, with Art Deco designs inspired by the Chrysler and Empire State buildings. The naming rights cost him $15 million.

35,000 Tennessee students apply for free community college (The Tennessean)
The Lynchburg, Tenn., school held what it called "Scholarship Saturday." In just four hours, more than 1,300 students signed up for Tennessee Promise, the new program led by Gov. Bill Haslam that gives Tennessee's high school seniors free tuition at the state's two-year community colleges and colleges of applied technology.

Colleges Experiment With Competency-Based Degrees (U.S. News & World Report)
The process for earning a degree was standardized long ago and hasn't changed much since.

What reauthorizing the Higher Education Act means for students (USA TODAY)
For the first time since the Higher Education Act was introduced nearly 50 years ago, U.S. student loan debt has surpassed $1 trillion.

October 10, 2014

Quote of the day:
“In matters of style, swim with the current. In matters of principle, stand like a rock.”
Thomas Jefferson

OpEd: Re-engineering City Colleges (Chicago Sun-Times)
For many decades, Americans were able to walk out of their high school graduations and right into a good job. We all know that’s no longer the case.

U. of C.'s Booth School again tops ranking of best MBA programs (Chicago Tribune)
The University of Chicago’s Booth School of Business has again topped The Economist’s list of best full-time MBA programs. . This is the fourth time in five years that Booth has captured the top spot in the rankings, which are published annually.

Education-Degree Programs, Once Popular, Take a Nosedive (Chronicle of Higher Education)
Holley Hamilton, a first-grade teacher in Charlotte, N.C., was considering going back to school for a master’s degree in education last year.

NIH Awards $32-Million to Tackle Big Data in Medicine (Chronicle of Higher Education)
The National Institutes of Health on Thursday awarded almost $32-million in grants to more than two dozen institutions to devise innovative ways of helping researchers handle huge sets of data seen as increasingly central to future medical discoveries.

Carnegie Classification Will Get a New Home—and Influence From Lumina (Chronicle of Higher Education)
The Lumina Foundation's framework for defining the key elements of a college degree is still a long way from being widely used in higher education.

Students’ Activities Outside Classes Are Imperative to Development (Chronicle of Higher Education)
It seems that William Deresiewicz’s opinion on the current student experience fails to consider the importance of a student’s holistic advancement.

ECC breaks ground on training center in Burlington (Courier News)
BURLINGTON — Elgin Community College broke ground in Burlington Wednesday for their $15 million Public Safety and Sustainability Training Center on Plank Road. A crowd of nearly 50 people attended the silver-shovel event. ECC President David Sam began the proceedings by recognizing the key people who helped make the vision for this emergency personnel training facility a reality.

Most NIU students go home on weekends (Daily Herald)
Before he ever set foot on the Northern Illinois University campus, freshman Angelo Gonzalez knew he would spend every other weekend with his family and friends in Chicago

Higher Ed Leaders Now Working to Close ‘Skills Gap Shortage’ (Diverse Issues in Higher Education)
It’s not just the economy that’s jobs driven anymore. A growing number of colleges and universities are partnering with employers to train students with the skills they will need to break into local industries—letting the jobs lead the way.

OpEd: What the Feds Can (and Can't) Do in Higher Ed Reform (Forbes)
There’s been a lot of talk recently about accountability in higher education. We added our voices to the mix earlier this week with a new AEI paper entitled “Untapped Potential: Making the Higher Education Market Work for Students and Taxpayers.”

Higher Ed on the Ballot (Inside Higher Ed)
Education may be a key issue in several states’ elections this fall, but referendums related to higher education are thin this political season.

Uni High facing unexpected $1 million-plus deficit after accounting error (News-Gazette)
University Laboratory High School in Urbana is facing a $1 million-plus deficit, blamed on an accounting error that charged salaries to a defunct account for several years.

UI, Mayo Clinic get $9.34 million from National Institutes of Health (News-Gazette)
The University of Illinois and Mayo Clinic have been awarded $9.34 million to develop a new tool to help doctors and biologists better analyze gene-based data.

Robert Morris University Illinois bets video game scholarship can draw talent (Peoria Journal Star)
As a teenager, holed up in his bedroom, illuminated by the glow of his laptop, Youngbin Chung became addicted to video games. Ten-hours-a-day addicted. Read more: http://www.pjstar.com/article/20141006/News/141009515#ixzz3FknTIeeH

Teacher preparation enrollments plummet (The Hechinger Report)
Enrollments in teacher preparation programs in California are continuing to decline at a precipitous rate, according to new figures from the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing.

Why SAT scores were packaged with results from other College Board tests (The Washington Post)
The SAT enjoyed such dominance in college admissions testing for so long that it is worth lingering over a significant change Tuesday in how the College Board reported annual scores: They were packaged with results from other programs.

Viewpoint: 6 real fixes for the student loan debt crisis (USA TODAY)
All across America, freshman college students are studying for their first midterms. Over the coming year, they will experience the joys of a meal plan, new freedoms, and, yes, enlightening academic thought. But they’ll also accumulate an average of $8,250 in new debt per year until, if they’re lucky, they graduate in four years.

October 9, 2014

Quote of the day:
“At the end of the day, let there be no excuses, no explanations, no regrets.”
Steve Maraboli

When Is a Student ‘First Generation’? Words Fail Us (Chronicle of Higher Education)
It seemed like a simple question: Which students do colleges consider to be "first generation"?

5 Flaws in the High-Stakes ‘Gainful Employment’ Rule (Chronicle of Higher Education)
After years of negotiation, lawsuits, and more negotiation, the Education Department is preparing to release this month the final version of its controversial "gainful employment" rule.

Lumina Looks to Expand Use of Framework to Track Student Learning (Chronicle of Higher Education)
More than three years ago, the Lumina Foundation unveiled a framework for defining what a college degree means and what graduates should be expected to know and be able to do.

SIU looking to recruit in southern Illinois (Daily Herald)
Southern Illinois University plans to shift its recruitment focus to students from the southern part of the state, returning to a strategy that worked in the past in an effort to boost enrollment.

Panel: ‘Guru Mentor Model’ Not Practical for Promoting Diversity Within STEM Professoriate (Diverse Issues in Higher Education)
In order to increase and maintain gender and ethnic diversity within the STEM professoriate, the “guru mentor model” should be scrapped and replaced with a more thoughtful approach to the specific needs that new STEM faculty members have as they seek to launch their careers.

Top 100 Degree Producers Special Report (Diverse Issues in Higher Education)
Our annual Top 100 Degree Producers special report — the only national report on the ability of U.S. colleges and universities to award associate, bachelor’s, graduate and professional degrees to African-American, Hispanic, Asian American and American Indian students.

Carnegie Classifications, Via Indiana (Inside Higher Ed)
For more than four decades, the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching has produced the definitive classification of higher education institutions.

New standards seek to measure what students actually know (The Hechinger Report)
As students, employers, and policymakers continue to question whether earning a college degree really proves that graduates are ready for work, a new set of voluntary standards proposes to set out what they should be learning—and measure whether or not they have.

Why Aid for College Is Missing the Mark (The New York Times)
In 1987, when he was Ronald Reagan’s education secretary, the conservative culture warrior William J. Bennett wrote a famous essay denouncing federal aid for higher education because it allowed colleges “blithely to raise their tuitions,” at little benefit to students.

Pension challenge remains on fast track (The Southern Illinoisan)
A legal challenge of the state's new pension changes remains on a fast track.

SIU shifting its focus farther south (The Southern Illinoisan)
SIU officials hope a return to a recruiting focus that worked in the past will help restore the school to its former enrollment heights.

Oped:A Pell Grant injustice for young offenders (The Washington Post)
This fall, as federally funded Pell Grants helped almost 9 million high school graduates attend college, a significant number of would-be students were left to sit idle in secure juvenile facilities around the country.

New Jersey’s Plan to Shut Down For-Profit Colleges (Washington Monthly)
It’s somewhat controversial (intrusion of federal power and all that) but one state, New Jersey, appears to have a plan to be even more punitive, at least to for-profit colleges. According to an Associated Press article:

October 8, 2014

Quote of the day:
"The worst mistake a boss can make is not to say 'well done'."
John Ashcroft

Editorial: Problem of campus sexual assault demands solution (Bloomington Pantagraph)
Imagine being in a large college classroom or in the stands at a football stadium.

Foreign language push features new state credential (Chicago Tribune)
Students taking an advanced Spanish class at Lincoln-Way North High school were discussing — without using a word of English — films and literature, including the dark tale, "Chac Mool," by the late Mexican writer Carlos Fuentes..

Should the Education Dept. Start Collecting Its Own Debts? (Chronicle of Higher Education)
Any day now, the Education Department will announce the awarding of millions of dollars in contracts to a slew of debt-collection companies that have been repeatedly accused of violating consumer-protection laws.

UIC professor named to NFL's violence panel (Daily Herald)
The director of the University of Illinois at Chicago's Institute for Research on Race and Public Policy has been named to the National Football League's newly formed panel addressing domestic violence. Beth Richie

Civic Committee seeking discussion about pensions (Daily Herald)
The Civic Committee of the Commercial Club is launching an initiative Wednesday that aims to spark a discussion about consequences if the Illinois Supreme Court strikes down pension overhaul legislation.

SAT Results Lead Officials to Call for Boost in Preparation of Underrepresented Minority Students (Diverse Issues in Higher Education)
Cognizant of the fact that this year’s SAT results reveal the same troubling trends as in years prior, College Board officials called for a greater emphasis on boosting preparedness for the growing amount of minority students who take the college entrance exam.

Starbucks: 1,000-plus Enrolled for Tuition Program (Diverse Issues in Higher Education)
Starbucks says more than 1,000 of its workers have enrolled for an upcoming fall semester at Arizona State University to take advantage of a program that helps pay for their tuition.

University of Illinois at Chicago Professor Named to NFL’s Violence Panel (Diverse Issues in Higher Education)
The director of the University of Illinois at Chicago’s Institute for Research on Race and Public Policy has been named to the National Football League’s newly formed panel addressing domestic violence.

Richland students quiz candidates (Herald & Review)
With the Nov. 4 general election looming, 18-year-old Heather Fitt wanted to make sure she knew the facts before casting her first vote.

Borrowing Rates for Wealthy Soar (Inside Higher Ed)
All college graduates are more likely than they were two decades ago to have financed their education with loans.

Colleges Seek Waivers to Experiment With Federal Aid (Inside Higher Ed)
Scores of colleges and universities are taking the Obama administration up on its offer to waive certain federal rules for institutions that want to test out competency-based education and other new models of higher education.

Competency-Based Education: No More Semesters (NPR)
"I went to a four-year university." "That job requires a one-year certificate." "It's a two-semester course." "She's a fifth-year senior." What do these expressions have in common? They use time as the yardstick for higher education.

Ending higher ed’s tuition addiction to produce teachers we need (The Hechinger Report)
If colleges want to reverse the declining number of teachers of color, create more STEM teachers, and calibrate teacher supply with district demand, then teacher preparation programs need to become less dependent on individuals’ tuition.

Dems demand more regs on for-profit colleges (The Hill)
Sens. Dick Durbin (D-Ill.), Tom Harkin (D-Iowa) and Rep. Elijah Cummings (D-Md.) touted the support of more than a dozen attorneys general for their Proprietary Education Oversight Coordination Improvement Act, which would allow the federal government to increase accountability standards for the colleges.

Why Aid for College Is Missing the Mark (The New York Times)
In 1987, when he was Ronald Reagan’s education secretary, the conservative culture warrior William J. Bennett wrote a famous essay denouncing federal aid for higher education because it allowed colleges “blithely to raise their tuitions,” at little benefit to students.

OpEd:This Little Piggy Went to College (The New York Times)
WHEN her son, Cole, came home from his first day of kindergarten at a public school in San Francisco two years ago, Lauren Sigurdson, a single mom who struggles to pay basic expenses, found a welcome surprise tucked in his backpack: a flier announcing that Cole would be getting his own savings account, with an initial $50 deposit.

SIU shifting its focus farther south (The Southern Illinoisan)
CARBONDALE -- SIU officials hope a return to a recruiting focus that worked in the past will help restore the school to its former enrollment heights. SIU hit its high-water mark in 1991, with 24,869 students attending the school.

Moody’s: Rising number of college applications doesn’t equal rising demand (The Washington Post)
Bottom line, Moody’s said, is that the growth in applications feeds a perception of selectivity for many schools that does not square with their actual situation in the market.

October 7, 2014

Quote of the day:
“Live out of your imagination, not your history.”
Stephen R. Covey

Grant enables ISU teacher program to expand to Decatur, Peoria (Bloomington Pantagraph)
A $10 million federal grant will enable Illinois State University to expand an urban teacher education program from the Chicago school system to Decatur District 6 and Peoria District 150.

Professor who lost U. of I. job offer lashes out at administrators (Chicago Tribune)
Controversial professor Steven Salaita, who lost his job offer from the University of Illinois after criticizing Israel on social media, lashed out at university administrators Monday for overreaching in their decision not to hire him..

How Universities Are Cutting the Time It Takes to Earn a Doctorate (Chronicle of Higher Education)
Many universities have started efforts to reduce the time it takes to earn a humanities Ph.D. Here are a few examples:

For Adjuncts, a Lot Is Riding on Student Evaluations (Chronicle of Higher Education)
In February 2012, Miranda Merklein received the email that many adjunct professors dread. - See more at: https://chroniclevitae.com/news/741-for-adjuncts-a-lot-is-riding-on-student-evaluations#sthash.4E1Z7tZF.dpuf

Clash Between Chicago State U. and Its Faculty Leaders Redefines Hardball (Chronicle of Higher Education)
Many higher-education institutions experience internal fights over governance, but Chicago State University’s administration and its Faculty Senate are going at each other in ways that their counterparts elsewhere have not thought of before.

Cornell U. to Put Community Work at Center of Undergraduate Education (Chronicle of Higher Education)
Cornell University announced on Monday an ambitious plan to make community engagement a pillar of its undergraduate education model, and give all students the technical, academic, and personal skills to become “engaged citizens of the world.”

Beware Higher-Ed Doomsayers (Chronicle of Higher Education)
As college presidents, we regularly hear dire warnings about higher education from parents, donors, trustees, public officials, family, friends, even total strangers. Sometimes the comments take the form of panicked accusation: "If colleges don’t do something about mounting student debt, there’s going to be another economic meltdown."

HSI Leaders Urged to Make Voices Heard When it Comes to Funding (Diverse Issues in Higher Education)
One of the most important topics for minority serving institutions is funding: where to find it and how to get it.

Grant enables ISU teacher program to expand to Decatur (Herald & Review)
A $10 million federal grant will enable Illinois State University to expand an urban teacher education program from the Chicago school system as well as the Decatur and Peoria school districts.

Discussion needed on education funding (Herald & Review)
Changing the way public education is funded in Illinois will be difficult and will require a lot of discussion.

Forgetting the Faculty (Inside Higher Ed)
The academic profession is squeezed from all sides. A recent white paper from the Presidential Innovation Lab of the American Council on Education focuses on “unbundling” and redesigning faculty roles — in a way assigning professors to specific functions in an assembly line of higher education. Some will teach only, others will do research, and so on.

Confessions of a Community College Dean (Inside Higher Ed)
In which a veteran of cultural studies seminars in the 1990s moves into academic administration and finds himself a married suburban father of two. Foucault, plus lawn care.

Flat SAT Scores (Inside Higher Ed)
SAT results for the Class of 2014 show mixed – and very slight – changes from last year.

Former UI prof feels Nobel snub (News-Gazette)
Three scientists were honored with Nobel prizes today for their work on light-emitting diodes, but the man considered the father of the LED wasn’t among them.

UI Paralympic training facility (News-Gazette)
University of Illinois wheelchair track coach Adam Bleakney talks about the training facility on Oak Street in Champaign.

Ending higher ed’s tuition addiction to produce teachers we need (The Hechinger Report)
If colleges want to reverse the declining number of teachers of color, create more STEM teachers, and calibrate teacher supply with district demand, then teacher preparation programs need to become less dependent on individuals’ tuition.

How Tuition Tracker helps kids compare colleges – and other tips for overwhelmed parents (The Hechinger Report)
It’s the thick of college application season, and your child is diligently churning out common application essays while simultaneously studying for four or five advanced placement exams and researching scholarships, right?

Want higher-ed reform? You may be surprised where you’ll find it (The Hechinger Report)
As a top student in high school, Amy Miramontes-Franco knew she was destined for college.

This Little Piggy Went to College (The New York Times)
WHEN her son, Cole, came home from his first day of kindergarten at a public school in San Francisco two years ago, Lauren Sigurdson, a single mom who struggles to pay basic expenses, found a welcome surprise tucked in his backpack: a flier announcing that Cole would be getting his own savings account, with an initial $50 deposit.

October 6, 2014

Quote of the day:
"Nothing is more despicable than respect based on fear."
Albert Camus

The Ph.D. Student's Ticking Clock (Chronicle of Higher Education)
The bill wasn’t that much as far as medical tabs go: $3,274. But when Robyn Schroeder learned that her Brown University health insurance would not cover the cost to remove three wisdom teeth, it set off what she calls her "odyssey of various jobs."

Clash Between Chicago State U. and Its Faculty Leaders Redefines Hardball (Chronicle of Higher Education)
Many higher-education institutions experience internal fights over governance, but Chicago State University’s administration and its Faculty Senate are going at each other in ways that their counterparts elsewhere have not thought of before.

For-Profit Giant Starts Competency-Based ‘Open College’ (Chronicle of Higher Education)
One of the biggest for-profit college companies in the country is creating an "Open College" aimed at adults who may already have skills and experience that could qualify for college credits.

Stymied on the Cusp of College (Chronicle of Higher Education)
More than a million recent high-school graduates across the country have taken the next important step in their lives by enrolling in college.

Beware Higher-Ed Doomsayers (Chronicle of Higher Education)
As college presidents, we regularly hear dire warnings about higher education from parents, donors, trustees, public officials, family, friends, even total strangers.

How Pay-for-Success Funding Might Help Low-Income Students (Chronicle of Higher Education)
Policy makers, college administrators, and parents are all searching for ways to help needy students graduate.

NIU program preps students for nonprofit world (Daily Herald)
Maria Torres of Elgin says her college coursework made a difference in her successfully breaking into the nonprofit world.

Can Focusing on Workplace Skills Increase College Completion Rates? (Diverse Issues in Higher Education)
When Cheryl Hyman, a former utilities executive, was tapped to become chancellor of the City Colleges of Chicago, the system of seven community colleges had a graduation crisis: Only seven percent of students were finishing their educations in a timely manner.

Experts: ‘Opportunity Gap’ Key Impediment to Black Male Academic Achievement (Diverse Issues in Higher Education)
What if the academic achievement problems with young Black males were not actually a problem with the students themselves, but a problem with those charged with educating them?

Discussion needed on education funding (Herald & Review)
Changing the way public education is funded in Illinois will be difficult and will require a lot of discussion.

What I Learned Talking to Grad Students (Inside Higher Ed)
On Friday, I had the chance to participate in a conference organized by Paula Krebs, from Bridgewater State, on preparing doctoral students for positions at teaching-intensive institutions.

FAFSA Transparency (Inside Higher Ed)
A national association of high school counselors and college admissions officers wants the federal government to stop providing student information to colleges that some institutions are using to disadvantage students who apply for admission and financial aid.

Standards for a Diversity Leader (Inside Higher Ed)
Assistant provost for diversity. Assistant to the president for institutional diversity and equity.

'Modernizing' Federal Regulation (Inside Higher Ed)
The federal government needs to revamp its oversight of higher education so that colleges and universities are held more accountable for the federal funds they receive, according to a new policy paper published today by a prominent conservative think tank.

Bands aim for right notes at EIU contest (Journal Gazette & Times-Courier)
The bitter October wind made flag tosses a bit more difficult and made tuning a bit of a challenge,

SIU warns of toxic algae in Carbondale campus lake (Journal Gazette & Times-Courier)
Southern Illinois University is cautioning people and pets to avoid skin contact with water from the Carbondale campus' lake because of naturally occurring toxic algae.

Alum to speak about investigative journalism at EIU (Journal Gazette & Times-Courier)
John Ferak, an editor an Eastern Illinois University alumnus, will return to his alma mater to talk about investigative journalism and the story behind his book “Bloody Lies: A CSI Scandal in the Heartland.”

UI Vet Med Open House gives kids chance to play animal doctor (News-Gazette)
Kadin Lemme, 6, of Mason City and 8-year-old Emily Duong of Champaign were veterinarians for the day Sunday — as were hundreds of other boys and girls who took part in the University of Illinois Vet Med Open House.

LLCC survey finds ‘sexting’ common among students (Springfield State Journal-Register)
A Lincoln Land Community College instructor is launching his own study into the prevalence of “sexting” — sexually explicit photographs or messages sent via cellphone — after an informal student survey found it might be more common than initially thought. Read more: http://www.sj-r.com/article/20141005/News/141009729#ixzz3FNb8A7qs

U of I entomologist winner of National Medal of Science (Springfield State Journal-Register)
The White House has named a University of Illinois entomology professor as a winner of the nation's highest honor for achievement in science and technology. Read more: http://www.sj-r.com/article/20141004/News/141009751#ixzz3FNHgKnjm

Policing University Partnerships in Authoritarian Countries (The New York Times)
A year ago, Wellesley College found itself embroiled in a debate about academic freedom in China.

When Higher Education Doesn’t Deliver on Its Promise (The New York Times)
To ride the New York City subway system is to be immersed in advertisements for higher education: Learn a skill, get a job, change your life.

Students Not Always Drawn to Fixed-Rate Tuition (The New York Times)
This fall semester, for the first time, all public universities in Texas were required to offer incoming students the option of a payment plan that fixed their tuition at a particular rate for four years, alleviating the uncertainty of variable annual increases.

Throw Out the College Application System (The New York Times)
THE college admissions system is broken.

Breast cancer awareness events include new scholarship (The Southern Illinoisan)
Southern Illinois University Carbondale’s new “Start Seeing Pink” initiative is both a breast cancer awareness campaign featuring a variety of special events and the launch pad for a new scholarship.

October 3, 2014

Quote of the day:
“Be sure you put your feet in the right place, then stand firm.”
Abraham Lincoln

ISU prof awarded $510,000 grant to study neurons (Bloomington Pantagraph)
An assistant professor of cellular neuro-physiology at Illinois State University has been awarded a three-year, $510,000 grant from the National Science Foundation to study neurons in the brain, ISU announced Thursday.

Bond hearing set for man accused of SIU threats (Bloomington Pantagraph)
A Chicago man who federal prosecutors accuse of mailing threats to Southern Illinois University's Carbondale campus will remain jailed at least a few more days

Editorial: A new path to college for CPS students (Chicago Tribune)
Every year, hundreds of Chicago Public Schools students earn decent grades, graduate from high school and then ... flounder. Many of them don't get the encouragement to enroll in college, many can't afford college tuition. That's a shame for them, their families and all of Chicago..

U of I nurses vote to strike if deal isn't reached soon (Chicago Tribune)
University of Illinois Hospital nurses voted overwhelmingly to strike if they can’t come to an agreement with the West Side hospital system by late October. . The 1,150 Illinois Nurses Association nurses had a three-year contract with the hospital system that has been extended twice already.

Unusual Loan Program Lets International Students Borrow Later, Repay Quickly (Chronicle of Higher Education)
There’s lots of interest these days in finding alternative ways to finance a degree. But the advice of experts hasn’t changed: Students who need to borrow for college should start with federal loans, which have fixed interest rates, more favorable terms, and income-based repayment options.

Siding With For-Profit Colleges, Judge Says Rule on Recruiter Pay Is Flawed (Chronicle of Higher Education)
A federal judge has sided with for-profit colleges in a lawsuit over an Education Department rule limiting the commissions colleges can pay to student recruiters, agreeing that the agency failed to justify parts of the rule.

Historian to Lead Notre Dame's First New School in Almost a Century (Chronicle of Higher Education)
A conversation with a group of biologists who study climate change led R. Scott Appleby, a historian, to refine some of his thinking about the new school he would lead at the University of Notre Dame.

What Lurks Behind Graduation Rates? A Lot of Noise—and Meaning (Chronicle of Higher Education)
There can be lots of variation underneath a college’s overall graduation rate. Recently, a colleague here at The Chronicle stumbled across an unusually detailed breakdown of graduation rates that drove the point home.

Experts Recommend Taking Control of Student Debt on the Front End (Diverse Issues in Higher Education)
Representatives of colleges and universities and innovators in education and the workplace gathered this week at the The Economist’s Higher Education Forum to examine issues that included reducing student debt and increasing college completion rates.

Rauner wants more higher education spending (Herald & Review)
Republican candidate for governor Bruce Rauner added Illinois universities to a growing list of state programs he thinks should get more money.

Confusion on Competency (Inside Higher Ed)
A federal audit has renewed confusion about whether the U.S. Department of Education will support bids by colleges to try an emerging form of competency-based education.

College Affordability, Upfront (Inside Higher Ed)
The Pell Grant program, once a powerful tool for promoting low-income access in higher education, has lost its luster.

EIU to preview water resources documentary (Springfield State Journal-Register)
A documentary on the country's water resources by an Eastern Illinois University faculty member and four students will be previewed on campus before showing on the campus' PBS TV station. Read more: http://www.sj-r.com/article/20141003/News/141009832#ixzz3F5uDfeej

Are math specialists the answer to teaching better math? (The Hechinger Report)
A few years ago, third-grade teacher Laura Metrano considered herself strictly a “language arts person.”

Can focusing on workplace skills increase college completion rates? (The Hechinger Report)
When Cheryl Hyman, a former utilities executive, was tapped to become chancellor of the City Colleges of Chicago, the system of seven community colleges had a graduation crisis: Only seven percent of students were finishing their educations in a timely manner.

Six men allegedly attack individual on SIU campus (The Southern Illinoisan)
Another assault allegedly took place Tuesday on the SIU campus.

Arrests made in SIU attack (The Southern Illinoisan)
SIU police have made two arrests in connection with the assault that took place Tuesday on campus.

October 2, 2014

Quote of the day:
“There is some good in this world, and it's worth fighting for.”
J.R.R. Tolkien

No new buildings, sports in Heartland's near future (Bloomington Pantagraph)
No new buildings or additional sports teams are in the immediate future for Heartland Community College, based on discussions at a board of trustees retreat.

CPS grads can qualify for new city college scholarships (Chicago Tribune)
Qualified graduates of Chicago's public high schools will be eligible for a free ride at one of the city's seven community colleges under a scholarship program announced today by Mayor Rahm Emanuel and City Colleges of Chicago Chancellor Cheryl Hyman.

What Lurks Behind Graduation Rates? A Lot of Noise—and Meaning (Chronicle of Higher Education)
There can be lots of variation underneath a college’s overall graduation rate.

What Keeps Women Out of Elite Colleges? Their SAT Scores (Chronicle of Higher Education)
We’ve all heard about the gender gap in higher education: Nationally, women enroll in college and complete degrees at higher rates than men do.

At Tech Trade Show, a Push to Give Colleges Better ‘Digital Intelligence’ (Chronicle of Higher Education)
More than 7,000 college officials gathered here this week for what is probably the largest higher-education-technology trade show in the United States, the annual meeting of Educause.

The world's elite colleges: Where Northwestern and U of C stand (Crain's Chicago Business)
When Northwestern University student Astrid Chun Lin Goh was choosing a college to attend, university rankings were her first stop to find out which schools were the best in the world. Originally from Bangkok, Ms. Goh knew she wanted to go abroad for school. Among the things that led her to Northwestern: its high spot on lists like the Times Higher Education's World Reputation Rankings, released today by the U.K.-based publication.

U of C gives low-income students an unusual leg up (Crain's Chicago Business)
(Bloomberg) — The University of Chicago said it will expand a program to replace loans with grants for all undergraduates with financial need. The move puts the U of C more in line with some of the most selective schools, including those in the Ivy League, which for years haven't included loans in financial packages for most students receiving aid.

Immigration Issues Spur New Age of Hispanic Student Activism (Diverse Issues in Higher Education)
From fostering meaningful debate to student activism to making sure future teachers have cultural sensitivity, immigration issues often come to the surface in college courses.

Diverse Conversations: The University Presidency and Athletics (Diverse Issues in Higher Education)
Having a world-class athletic program is a luxury that few higher education institutions enjoy.

New Center Seeks to Boost Knowledge, Interest in Hispanic-Serving Institutions (Diverse Issues in Higher Education)
Seeking to address a gap in knowledge about Hispanic-serving colleges nationwide, a leading research group on Tuesday launched a virtual data center to provide key information about these institutions as well as promising practices in serving Latino students.

Avoiding the Freshman 15 Can Have Long-Term Health Benefits (Diverse Issues in Higher Education)
Recently, thousands of African-American students started college for the first time and lots of big changes are headed their way. Life away from home includes a whole host of new responsibilities like arriving to class on time, getting good grades, meal planning on a limited budget and the list goes on.

LLCC students share cultures (Google News)
A multicultural event hosted by Lincoln Land Community College students Wednesday put a focus on Jacksonville’s diverse culture and its place in history.

Donations offer 'boundless' opportunities for Millikin students (Herald & Review)
Two Millikin University juniors will receive a stipend to work with 300 Below this semester to confirm that the steel parts used in wind turbine gear boxes last 300 percent to 400 percent longer when cryogenically tempered.

Moody's: Misleading Student Demand Creates Uncertainty (Inside Higher Ed)
A new report from Moody's Investors Service describes how the phenomenon of high school students applying to significantly more colleges and universities is causing difficulties for institutions

2 New Plans for Free Community College Tuition (Inside Higher Ed)
Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel announced that the city would provide scholarships for tuition, fees and books for all students who graduate from the Chicago public schools with a 3.0 grade-point average or higher

Ranking and Networking (Inside Higher Ed)
LinkedIn has officially joined the jam-packed college rankings party. And with 313 million users, the job networking site has a big data sample both for creating the rankings and for marketing them.

Double Standard at Illinois (Inside Higher Ed)
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign officials have argued that they were justified in refusing to hire Steven Salaita because his bigoted comments indicated a bias that would deprive students of their right to be “comfortable” (a right that does not and should not exist at any college committed to the discussion of ideas that may lead to uncomfortable truths).

Without Student Engagement, Nothing Else Matters (Inside Higher Ed)
arlier this year, in a post titled “An Open Letter to the Education System: Please Stop Destroying Students,” I declared that we have a “curiosity crisis” in our schools.

Online Student Life (Inside Higher Ed)
Most campus-based colleges have some form of a “student activities” or “student life” office.

Rauner: State should spend more on universities (Journal Gazette & Times-Courier)
BLOOMINGTON -- Republican candidate for governor Bruce Rauner added Illinois universities to a growing list of state programs he thinks should get more money. The political newcomer from Winnetka told a joint meeting of the editorial boards of The (Bloomington) Pantagraph and the Decatur Herald & Review, both sister papers to the JG-TC, on Wednesday that an influx of cash for higher education could be used to address skyrocketing college tuition costs.

Peace Corps program’s launch at WIU?set for Monday (McDonough County, The Voice)
Western Illinois University undergraduate students who are interested in joining the Peace Corps can now apply for a special program designed to prepare them for international service.

WIU trustees to consider budgets (McDonough County, The Voice)
The Western Illinois University Board of Trustees will consider several fiscal year 2015 and 2016 budget items during a meeting set for Friday on the Macomb campus. Read more: http://www.mcdonoughvoice.com/article/20141001/News/141009941#ixzz3F0NESizt

UIS Student Union campaign starts with $2.4 million (Springfield State Journal-Register)
Private gifts totaling $2.4 million have been earmarked for the new Student Union at the University of Illinois Springfield. Read more: http://www.sj-r.com/article/20141001/News/141009923#ixzz3EznrZqsJ

Illinois universities competing for students (Springfield State Journal-Register)
As public university enrollment declines or remains flat, Illinois schools are competing to recruit students from across the country and around the world. Read more: http://www.sj-r.com/article/20141001/News/141009956#ixzz3EzojsUA5

LLCC gets water-management grant (Springfield State Journal-Register)
Lincoln Land Community College has been awarded a grant of nearly $883,000 to develop workforce training programs in agricultural watershed and landscape lake management. Read more: http://www.sj-r.com/article/20141001/News/141009937#ixzz3F01nGWp1

Why the U.S. isn’t likely to meet Obama’s goal on college graduation rates (The Hechinger Report)
In his first address to a joint session of Congress five years ago, President Obama established an important – and some would argue, audacious – goal for our nation: “By 2020, America will once again have the highest proportion of college graduates in the world.”

At Berkeley, Free (Though Subdued) Speech, 50 Years Later (The New York Times)
Fifty years ago Wednesday, Jack Weinberg sat in the back of a police car on the University of California campus here for 32 hours while thousands of students blocked the vehicle’s exit, protesting Mr. Weinberg’s arrest on charges of manning an information table about the civil rights movement.

The University of Chicago Tries to Catch Up on Economic Diversity (The New York Times)
The University of Chicago announced a significant new program Wednesday to recruit more low-income students and to help them while on campus.

SIU, SIH on board with plan for downtown Carbondale (The Southern Illinoisan)
Representatives from SIU and Southern Illinois Healthcare said Wednesday their organizations are completely in favor of forming a downtown master plan.

SIU honored as military friendly school (The Southern Illinoisan)
A military-based magazine has honored SIU for the educational opportunities the school affords to student veterans and active duty personnel.

Markusen presents leaders with 'creative economy' ideas (The Southern Illinoisan)
Community leaders were presented Wednesday at the Paul Simon Public Policy Institute's Creative Economy in Southern Illinois series with the potential a “creative economy” could produce in Southern Illinois.

October 1, 2014

Quote of the day:
“Reflect upon your present blessings of which every man has many – not on your past misfortunes, of which all men have some.”
Charles Dickens

Northeastern Illinois University unveils flashy new building on NW Side (Chicago Sun-Times)
The unveiling of Northeastern Illinois University’s “El Centro” building — that bright blue-and-yellow modern building that had Kennedy Expressway drivers gazing for months — brought out powerful Chicago politicians and alumni on Tuesday.

Most Chicago-area colleges see drop in student loan defaults (Chicago Sun-Times)
A majority of major Chicago-area colleges and universities boast lower student-loan default rates than the new national average reported Wednesday, government data show.

A University for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing Takes Action (Chronicle of Higher Education)
Gallaudet University, the Washington, D.C., institution for the deaf and hard of hearing, has been praised by the Department of Justice for its work in educating staff members and students on sexual-misconduct issues.

Optimism About MOOCs Fades in Campus IT Offices (Chronicle of Higher Education)
MOOC fever is cooling, at least among campus information-technology administrators, according to the 2014 edition of the Campus Computing Survey, an annual report on technology in higher education.

Meet the First Winners of the Education Dept.’s ‘First in the World’ Grants (Chronicle of Higher Education)
The U.S. Department of Education announced on Tuesday the winners of its new First in the World grant program, giving a total of $75-million to 24 colleges and universities that have pledged to improve college access and student learning while reducing the overall cost of a degree.

What You Need to Know About Companies That Run Online Programs for Colleges (Chronicle of Higher Education)
"Publish or perish" is an old saw that, like so many things in higher education, has been updated to reflect modern wisdom. The revised version of the phrase offers advice not to professors but to colleges: "Partner or perish."

U of I to honor ag industry during football game (Daily Herald)
The University of Illinois is set to pay tribute to the state's agriculture industry during the upcoming Illinois-Purdue football game.

Northeastern Illinois unveils $27 million building (Daily Herald)
Northeastern Illinois University has unveiled a $27 million building in northwestern Chicago that will host computer science and justice studies classes.

Hampton University Shares in $75M First In The World Grants Program (Diverse Issues in Higher Education)
The U.S. Department of Education announced the 24 colleges and universities who cumulatively were awarded $75 million from the First In The World (FITW) four-year grants program. Almost 500 institutions applied after the grants program was proposed in May.

Education Spending by Affluent Widening Wealth Gap (Diverse Issues in Higher Education)
Education is supposed to help bridge the gap between the wealthiest people and everyone else. Ask the experts, and they’ll count the ways: Preschool can lift children from poverty.

Learning From Minority-Serving Institutions (Diverse Issues in Higher Education)
I’ve spent my entire career studying undergraduate and graduate education, and I’ve visited over 40 historically Black colleges and universities as part of my work as an expert witness for the U.S. government in major civil rights cases regarding race and gender in higher education.

University of Illinois to honor ag industry during football game (Herald & Review)
The University of Illinois is set to pay tribute to the state's agriculture industry during the upcoming Illinois-Purdue football game.

Private student loan can outlive student (Herald & Review)
When a young person who has student loans dies unexpectedly, the sad situation may be compounded by student debt falling on the shoulders of the parents.

U. of Chicago Expands Aid for Low-Income Students (Inside Higher Ed)
The University of Chicago today announced an expansion of efforts to help low-income students.

Federal Innovation Grants Unveiled (Inside Higher Ed)
The Obama administration announced Tuesday that it will award a total of $75 million to 24 colleges to support innovations in higher education.

The latest in the Steven Salaita saga (News-Gazette)
Nearly three weeks after the University of Illinois Board of Trustees rejected his appointment to the faculty, Salaita and his lawyers appear closer to taking legal action against the UI. "

Augustana launches a new approach (Quad-Cities Online)
The days of putting in four years of rigorous academic work in college, then heading to the career placement office on campus in spring of senior year for a job assignment are over. Read more: http://www.aledotimesrecord.com/article/20140929/News/140929328#ixzz3EuILeTVW

Mass. education leaders set sights on boosting college graduation rates (The Boston Globe)
A group of leading education officials and organizations in Massachusetts will unveil a new push Wednesday to improve local college graduation rates.

Mining educational data by inventing apps for all to use (The Hechinger Report)
One indisputable effect of introducing technology into education has been the generation of unprecedented amounts of electronic data on America’s public school students — their attendance, their test scores, their graduation rates, and many other kinds of information that can now be tracked and stored in massive databases.

University of Chicago Acts to Improve Access for Lower-Income Students (The New York Times)
With elite colleges under growing pressure to enroll more low-income students, the University of Chicago is taking a series of rare steps to make applying faster, simpler and cheaper, and to make studying there more affordable.

In a First for Cornell, a Woman Is Appointed as Its Next President (The New York Times)
Elizabeth Garrett, the provost of the University of Southern California, will become the next president of Cornell University, the first woman to hold that position, Cornell announced on Tuesday.

New Federal Guidelines Aim to Rid Schools of Racial Inequality (The New York Times)
With racial minorities still less likely than white students to have access to rigorous academic classes or experienced and qualified teachers, the Obama administration will announce guidelines on Wednesday to ensure that strong teachers, high-level math and science courses, quality extracurricular programs, and equivalent technology and school facilities are available for all public school students.

What is a STEM occupation? (The Washington Post)
A recent report by the U.S. Census Bureau said that 74 percent of all people who hold bachelor’s degrees in the four STEM subjects — science, technology, engineering and math — don’t have jobs in what are considered to be STEM occupations.

Five Education Trends (Yahoo News)
According to Lumina Foundation President and CEO Jamie Merisotis, there are five key trends happening in higher education that warrant our attention:

September 30, 2014

Quote of the day:
"A person who won't read has no advantage over one who can't read."
Mark Twain

Commentary: Steven Salaita: U. of I. destroyed my career (Chicago Tribune)
eing recruited for a tenured faculty position at a major university is no small feat, nor should it be; tenure represents the pinnacle of an academic career. In my case, it involved numerous interviews with faculty in the American Indian studies program at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and an intensive review of my scholarship, pedagogy and professional service..

U. of I. pitches new medical school (Chicago Tribune)
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign officials are lobbying to establish a new and independent college of medicine, an idea that has rankled counterparts at its sister campus in Chicago who currently oversee the university system's medical education..

4 Years and $2-Billion in Community-College Training Grants, State by State (Chronicle of Higher Education)
The White House on Monday unveiled the winners of the fourth and final round of Trade Adjustment Assistance Community College and Career Training grants.

The Upside of Selling Your Soul (Chronicle of Higher Education)
Hey, you, riding the subway.

What You Need to Know About Companies That Run Online Programs for Colleges (Chronicle of Higher Education)
"Publish or perish" is an old saw that, like so many things in higher education, has been updated to reflect modern wisdom.

Can’t Get Into Berkeley? You Might Like (Chronicle of Higher Education)
A contract between 2U and the University of California at Berkeley sheds light on how applicant data might be used for marketing purposes when a university outsources its recruiting to an online "enabler," a company that helps traditional institutions move their programs to the web.

For Bill on Disabled Access to Online Teaching Materials, the Devil’s in the Details (Chronicle of Higher Education)
As smart classrooms become the norm on more campuses and online courses proliferate, some observers worry that the digital revolution will leave students with disabilities behind.

Talladega College President Knows From Experience Potential Pitfalls of Labeling (Diverse Issues in Higher Education)
Dr. Billy C. Hawkins knows firsthand the dangers of being inaccurately diagnosed with a learning disability.

Biden Announces $450 Million Worth of Grants for Higher Ed (Diverse Issues in Higher Education)
Vice President Joe Biden announced the recipients of $450 million in grants designed to help community colleges and other institutions of higher education provide better job training for students.

One powerful 'umbrella' (Herald & Review)
Hoping to shine more light on the benefits of renewable energy, the Student Sustainability Committee at Illinois State University has approved a solar-powered table that can recharge up to five electronic devices at a time.

White House Announces Job-Training Grants (Inside Higher Ed)
Vice President Joe Biden and Arne Duncan, the U.S. Secretary of Education, on Monday announced the final installment of $2 billion in competitive grants under the so-called Trade Adjustment Assistance Community College and Career Training Program (TAACCCT).

The college completion crisis (News-Gazette)
Over 17 million students are now seeking two- or four-year degrees at American colleges and universities, but many will never complete their studies.

Op-ed: Pension cost shift would lead to higher taxes (Springfield State Journal-Register)
Serious efforts are underway in the Illinois General Assembly to pass legislation to shift billions of dollars in education pension obligations from the state to local schools.

Blog: Do We Still Care About Fairness? (The Friday Memo)
“Everyone deserves a fair shot.” That phrase captures a fundamental value that is characteristically American. Whether or not we have historically lived that value through our policies and practices is more than an open question, but most Americans have and still do embrace the idea of fairness.

Is the new AP U.S. History really anti-American? (The Hechinger Report)
Martin Luther King Jr., Benjamin Franklin, George Washington Carver, James Madison and Rosa Parks.

How college ed programs try, fail to recruit teachers of color (The Hechinger Report)
Nationally, black males account for 2 percent of the teacher population. Blacks in total represent 8 percent of all teachers; Latinos, 7 percent; and Asians, 2 percent.

Facing money and enrollment squeeze, more women’s colleges go coed (The Hechinger Report)
Twenty-five years ago, when dwindling enrollment at Wilson College in Pennsylvania threatened to close its doors, a swell of opposition by staff and students stopped it.

Homeless students increase by 58 percent in past six years (The Hechinger Report)
Despite signs of a national economic recovery, homelessness in U.S. public schools steadily increased 8 percent, to 1.26 million students, in the 2012-13 school year from the previous year.

How we can use the spotlight of Vergara to raise teaching standards (The Hechinger Report)
I was in my second year of teaching when an English teacher at my school told me that Maria could copy her reading summaries right out of the book since “at least she tried to do her homework.”

Organizing to Defend a Professor's Freedom of Speech (The New York Times)
On a Friday night in early August, Prof. Corey Robin put out a call on his blog. There had been plenty of grumbling over the University of Illinois’s decision to revoke a job offer to Prof. Steven G. Salaita, who gained notoriety for incendiary tweets about Israel.

Want proof college is worth it? Look at this list of the highest-paying majors (The Washington Post)
Is a four-year college degree worth it? Generally yes, but the results vary quite a bit across majors — and can even vary widely within majors.

The $10,000 Community College B.A (USA TODAY)
As employers are increasingly looking for college-educated workers to fill lower level jobs, community colleges are stepping up to the plate to meet those workforce demands.

September 29, 2014

Quote of the day:
“Develop an attitude of gratitude, and give thanks for everything that happens to you, knowing that every step forward is a step toward achieving something bigger and better than your current situation.”
Brian Tracey

Worst Colleges List Published (Alton Daily News)
There's a list out of America's worst colleges.

ISU students get a charge out of solar table (Bloomington Pantagraph)
Hoping to shine more light on the benefits of renewable energy, the Student Sustainability Committee at Illinois State University approved a solar-powered table that can recharge up to five electronic devices at a time.

Trinity accepts donation of 500-year-old Torah scroll (Chicago Tribune)
Deerfield, Ill. - An Ashkenazi Torah originating in late 15th century Germany has been donated to Trinity International University, where it will be displayed and used as an academic resource..

Immigration status no roadblock to college (Chicago Tribune)
A foundation whose leaders include Commerce Secretary Penny Pritzker is launching a partnership Monday with a charter school network to provide $3 million in college scholarships to 70 Chicago high school seniors whose immigration status is undocumented..

Academic Experts Lend Credibility to Bogus Claims of Ebola Cure (Chronicle of Higher Education)
Until last week, the University of Oklahoma researcher Hsueh-Kung Lin served on the scientific advisory board of a company with important news for a world fearful of Ebola: The deadly virus is no match for its therapeutic oil treatments.

ISU addresses sexual violence through education (Daily Herald)
Illinois State University held a panel to discuss sexual assault prevention and education Thursday in response to four sexual assaults reported within the first six weeks of fall semester.

University of Chicago cuts ties with Confucius Institute (Daily Herald)
The University of Chicago cut ties with a Chinese language and research center following a Chinese media report that suggested the university had bowed to the authority of the institute's leader in Beijing.

Proponents Push for Creative Methods to Cultivate Interest in STEM (Diverse Issues in Higher Education)
Even though mastery of math and science is a critical part of the effort to achieve more proportionate Black representation in STEM fields, a bigger part of the equation is to spark student interest in STEM careers.

University of Chicago Cuts Ties With Confucius Institute (Diverse Issues in Higher Education)
The University of Chicago cut ties with a Chinese language and research center following a Chinese media report that suggested the university had bowed to the authority of the institute’s leader in Beijing.

BOT to Act on FY'16 Budget (Google News)
The Western Illinois University Board of Trustees will consider the Fiscal Year 2016 operating budget and capital budget recommendations, as well as the FY'15 All-Funds Budget to be presented to state governance at the Friday, Oct. 3 Board meeting in the University Union Capitol Rooms on the Macomb campus.

Students' love of Biology grows atop science building (Herald & Review)
Biology major Jessica Kerr is gaining ground on an environmental enigma unique to the Midwest.

ISU mulls enrollment increases (Herald & Review)
Illinois State University is taking a closer look at what has been considered the enrollment “sweet spot” of 20,000 to 21,000 students.

Open house highlights adult education options (Herald & Review)
In Illinois, 1.3 million people lack a high school diploma or equivalency.

Corinthian Facing Another Federal Investigation (Inside Higher Ed)
Corinthian Colleges said Friday that the U.S. Department of Justice is investigating whether the company defrauded the federal government.

Brown signs bill aimed at reducing sex assaults on college campuses (Los Angeles Times)
emocratic Gov. Jerry Brown signed legislation Sunday making California the first state in the nation to require its colleges and universities to adopt a standard of clear consent for students engaging in sexual activity, an effort to combat rape and sexual assault on campuses..

Op-Ed: The college completion crisis (News-Gazette)


A record year of fundraising (News-Gazette)
Private support for the UI has never been more generous or more necessary.

Western Illinois tops buildings with vegetation (Quad-City Times)
In the business of education, Western Illinois University Quad-Cities is even finding lessons in its new green roofs.

Knox College completing renovation of alumni building (Springfield State Journal-Register)
Knox College in Galesburg is completing a $16 million renovation project on its alumni building from 1889. Read more: http://www.sj-r.com/article/20140929/News/140929490#ixzz3EiOGFINK

Authorities say woman plottedto have officials killed (Springfield State Journal-Register)
A suburban Chicago woman has been charged with threatening public officials after authorities say she plotted to have two town officials killed. Read more: http://www.sj-r.com/article/20140929/News/140929493#ixzz3EiOhjIl5

UIS Student Union fundraising set to kick off (Springfield State Journal-Register)
The University of Illinois Springfield is kicking off its Student Union fundraising campaign Tuesday with a free carnival-themed event on campus. Read more: http://www.sj-r.com/article/20140928/News/140929498#ixzz3EiPa3MLS

(The New York Times)


Agency Warns About Decline in Access to Education (The New York Times)
Social mobility through education is waning around the world, despite increased access to education, the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development warned in a report this month.

Colleges Make It Easier for Students to Show, Not Tell, in Their Applications (The New York Times)
Madeline McDonough had a wistful “what if?” moment, pondering the offer that her school, Goucher College, has made to applicants: Instead of showing us your grades, send us a video.

Oklahoma higher ed chancellor: No better investment for state (The Oklahoman)
Oklahoma’s Complete College America (CCA) goal is to increase the number of degrees and certificates earned in this state by an average of 1,700 per year, resulting in a 67 percent increase by 2023.

SIU recognized for diversity for third straight year (The Southern Illinoisan)
A magazine that celebrates diversity in education has recognized SIU for its commitment to diversity for the third straight year.

Fuller’s work, legacy are focus of Morris Library gala (The Southern Illinoisan)
The spotlight will shine in October on R. Buckminster Fuller and the legacy of the late Southern Illinois University Carbondale designer, educator, architect, inventor and visionary.

(The Southern Illinoisan)


22,000 enroll in Tennessee Promise for free community college tuition (The Tennessean)
Some 22,800 students have registered so far in Gov. Bill Haslam's Tennessee Promise program, which offers "last dollars" scholarships to high school graduates wanting to attend two-year state community colleges or colleges of applied technology, officials say.

Op-Ed: The investment in for-profit colleges isn’t paying off (The Washington Post)
For-profit colleges can’t get no respect, at least not from employers. Which suggests that maybe they should be getting less generous taxpayer subsidies, too.

The STEM paradoxes: Graduates’ lack of non-technical skills, and not enough women (The Washington Post)
On Monday, the New York Academy of Sciences announced that even though the global economy is generating a record number of scientists, it still faces a shortage in science professionals.

September 26, 2014

Quote of the day:
“Our lives begin to end the day we become silent about things that matter.”
Martin Luther King, Jr.

Chancellor: SIUE making impressive gains, despite low state funding (Belleville News-Democrat)
EDWARDSVILLE — Resurgence in enrollment, steady gains on diversity and international studies and staying afloat in hard financial times were the major points in the annual State of the University address by Chancellor Julie Furst-Bowe. Read more here: http://www.bnd.com/2014/09/25/3421108/chancellor-siue-enrollment-academics.html?sp=/99/166/#storylink=cpy

State universities pension board director will retire next year (Chicago Sun-Times)
The board that oversees Illinois state universities’ employees’ pension system is about to get an overhaul. William Mabe, executive director of the State University Retirement System, will retire on March 31, and five of the 11 board members’ terms will expire next summer.

‘Excellent Sheep’ Author Returns to Yale to Tend His Flock (Chronicle of Higher Education)
William Deresiewicz expected a spirited homecoming when he came back to Yale University on Wednesday.

In the Role of College President, Many Politicians Shed Their Partisanship (Chronicle of Higher Education)
The controversy it has caused may be intense, but State Sen. John E. Thrasher’s appointment as president of Florida State University has a very familiar ring to it.

The Man Who Ranks Philosophy Departments Now Rankles Them, Too (Chronicle of Higher Education)
Brian Leiter may be a law professor, a philosopher, and the editor of an influential report that ranks universities’ philosophy departments.

What You Need to Know About Yik Yak, an App Causing Trouble on Campuses (Chronicle of Higher Education)
Anonymous posts on a smartphone application called Yik Yak are facilitating conversations on college campuses, but the dialogue is not always fit for the classroom.

College Counseling Centers Turn to Teletherapy to Treat Students for Anxiety (Chronicle of Higher Education)
James D. Herbert tells one of his patients to go into the bathroom—with a laptop.

HBCUs Need to Start Prepping Potential College Students (Diverse Issues in Higher Education)
Rather than react to perpetual questions about their relevance, HBCUs and Predominantly Black Institutions should be proactive about drilling down deeper into America’s K-12 systems in order to better prepare students for the demands of a postsecondary education.

Blacks Less Influenced by STEM Gender Stereotypes Than Whites (Diverse Issues in Higher Education)
Researchers and others examining the challenges African-American women confront in earning college degrees in science, technology, engineering and math fields may want to consider new research showing that, while Black women are more likely than White women to express interest in STEM majors at the start of their college careers, Black women are less likely to actually complete STEM degrees.

Hispanic Heritage Month (Diverse Issues in Higher Education)
This issue contains a special focus on Hispanics in higher education in honor of Hispanic Heritage Month.

UIS to hold career fair for student, alumni, community members (Google News)
The University of Illinois Springfield Career Development Center is hosting the 2014 "Foot in the Door" Career Fair on September 25.

Richland anti-bullying group shares stories (Herald & Review)
For Richland Community College student Mike Davis, having a softer heart is worth more than tougher skin.

Retaining International Students Post-Graduation (Inside Higher Ed)
recent workforce report for the city of St. Louis found that while there were about 23,000 jobs in science, technology, engineering and mathematics fields advertised last year, there were only about 2,000 job-seekers in those fields. Betsy Cohen, the executive director of the St. Louis Mosaic Project, has an idea for who can fill some of those jobs: the city’s international students.

An Insufficient Census (Inside Higher Ed)
The federal government’s long-awaited data on the students enrolled in distance education courses nationwide provide a dubious baseline, a new study suggests, as confusing instructions, inflexible design and a lack of coordination have led colleges and universities to under- or overreport thousands of students.

Oklahoma shatters degree-completion goal in Complete College America initiative (NewsOK.com)
Oklahoma exceeded its year-two Complete College America goal by more than double, state officials announced Thursday. Oklahoma’s public and private higher education institutions and career technology centers have been challenged to increase the number of degrees and certificates earned by an average of 1,700 per year from 2011 to 2023.

Oregon student debt doubles in a decade, colleges increasingly dependent on borrowed money (Oregon Live)
Dean Wright, a junior at Western Oregon University this fall, is an invaluable commodity in today's Oregon -- a bright, ambitious kid from decidedly modest means determined to transcend his hardscrabble background.

QU receives $1.5 million -- more than $800,000 above what it was expecting (Quincy Herald-Whig)
Quincy University received a nice surprise Wednesday night. A nice, big surprise. Gov. Pat Quinn announced a $1.5 million investment in QU as part of his Illinois Jobs Now! capital program, a figure that was about $840,000 more than the school originally expected. Quinn made his announcement in front of Francis Hall to a gathering of about 250 university officials and students, plus other civic and community leaders and citizens.

Colleges take cues from private business to improve their customer service (The Hechinger Report)
CLAYTON, Missouri — The man in the impeccably tailored black suit has the people in his audience engrossed as he describes the secrets that have made his multibillion-dollar company internationally known for customer service.

Colleges take cues from private business to improve their customer service (The Hechinger Report)
The man in the impeccably tailored black suit has the people in his audience engrossed as he describes the secrets that have made his multibillion-dollar company internationally known for customer service.

Gupta raises labor issues at SIU (The Southern Illinoisan)
CARBONDALE -- A national expert on employee issues kicked off Thursday the Paul Simon Public Policy Institute's The State of the American Worker series. Sarita Gupta, Jobs with Justice executive director, discussed the struggles of employees to organize for better work conditions, higher wages, job security and full-time hours.

September 25, 2014

Quote of the day:
“When we are unable to find tranquility within ourselves, it is useless to seek it elsewhere. ”
Francois de La Rochefoucauld

In the Role of College President, Many Politicians Shed Their Partisanship (Chronicle of Higher Education)
The controversy it has caused may be intense, but State Sen. John E. Thrasher’s appointment as president of Florida State University has a very familiar ring to it.

As Default Rates Drop, So Does Confidence in How the Education Dept. Counts Them (Chronicle of Higher Education)
The official federal student-loan default rate fell a percentage point this year, with the largest dip occurring in the for-profit sector, data released on Wednesday by the U.S. Department of Education show.

In 11th-Hour Move, Education Dept. Spares the Rod on Loan Defaults (Chronicle of Higher Education)
On the eve of the much-anticipated release of its annual roundup of student-loan default rates, the Education Department has announced that it will spare some colleges whose high rates would have cost them their ability to award federal student aid.

U.S. College Enrollment Drops for 2nd Year in a Row, Census Bureau Reports (Chronicle of Higher Education)
College enrollment dropped by 463,000 students from 2012 to 2013, according to a U.S. Census Bureau report released on Wednesday.

From missiles to wearables: U of I startup gets $650,000 (Crain's Chicago Business)
University of Illinois researchers figure that the same techniques that can be used for tracking missiles and space junk can make wearable fitness devices perform better.

SIU student leaders form assault task force (Daily Herald)
Student leaders at Southern Illinois University formed a new task force aiming to prevent incidents of sexual assault and street violence.

New Alliance Seeks Improved Graduation Rates at Public Research Universities (Diverse Issues in Higher Education)
With a major emphasis on low-income and first-generation students, 11 public research universities have joined together in a national coalition to develop new practices to improve retention and graduation rates.

Federal Student Loan Default Rate Drops But Critics Question Data (Diverse Issues in Higher Education)
The rate at which students default on federal student loans after three years dropped to 13.7 percent for students who began repaying their loans in fiscal 2011 — a full percentage point lower than the previous year’s cohort, the U.S. Department of Education announced Wednesday amid skepticism about the meaning of the numbers and questions over how they were calculated.

HBCU Advocates Riding Wave of Wariness Over Proposed College Ratings System (Diverse Issues in Higher Education)
Dr. William R. Harvey, president of Hampton University and chairman of the White House Advisory Board on Historically Black Colleges and Universities, cut straight to the chase in his opening remarks at the National HBCU Week Conference.

When a Privileged Scholar Tries to Examine Privilege (Diverse Issues in Higher Education)
About a year ago, a colleague posted a Facebook status update that linked to “The Disadvantages of an Elite Education,” by William Deresiewicz, an essay that was a few years old back then.

Millikin, Dennis students building on visit to China (Herald & Review)
Millikin University's summer immersion trip to China took a budding relationship among three schools to the next level.

Default Rates Dip (Slightly) (Inside Higher Ed)
After increasing for years, the rate at which students default on their loans several years after leaving college has ticked down slightly across all sectors of higher education, the U.S. Department of Education announced Wednesday.

EIU search committee prepares 'blueprint' (Journal Gazette & Times-Courier)
CHARLESTON -- The search for Eastern Illinois University's new president is just about ready to start taking names. During a meeting Wednesday, Presidential Search Committee members met to finalize the search timeline and make changes to the university profile, which will be used as an introduction to the institution for prospective candidates.

Kentucky making push to re-enroll former college students (Lexington Herald-Leader)
If you attended college but never graduated with a degree, Kentucky education officials want to get you back in school. Read more here: http://www.kentucky.com/2014/09/23/3443847_kentucky-making-push-to-re-enroll.html?rh=1#storylink=cpy

Unending curiosity: At nearly 100, prof continues provocative research into human health (News-Gazette)
Targeting a primary cause of heart disease might be enough for one research lifetime, but Fred Kummerow doesn't rest on past glory.

Rauner backs UI trustees on Salaita (News-Gazette)
Republican gubernatorial candidate Bruce Rauner jumped into the Steven Salaita-University of Illinois controversy on Wednesday, expressing support for Urbana campus Chancellor Phyllis Wise, and condemning Gov. Pat Quinn for his silence on the uproar.

UIC College of Nursing to offerbachelor’s degree program at UIS (Springfield State Journal-Register)
Nursing students will be able to earn a University of Illinois at Chicago bachelor’s degree on the Springfield campus of the U of I beginning next August. Read more: http://www.sj-r.com/article/20140924/News/140929727#ixzz3EL3qtD98

Protecting Student Privacy in Online Learning (The New York Times)
Schools are increasingly using online learning technology. Advocates tout its use in tailoring lessons to each child’s pace and ability as a revolution in education.

What would 15% cut mean for state’s colleges? (The Seattle Times)
Washington’s public college and university presidents decline to make a “hit list” of programs to cut and say less money would mean higher tuition and lower enrollments.

The 5 Colleges That Leave the Most Students Crippled By Debt (TIME)
More than one out of eight students who had a federal student loan and left college or graduate school in 2011 has since defaulted—a total of almost 650,000 Americans, the U.S. Department of Education reported today.

September 24, 2014

Quote of the day:
"Kindness is like a baton in a relay race, you pass it on when it is passed onto you."
Usman Ismaheel

Local enrollment increases not typical of small colleges (Herald News)
Lewis University’s main campus in Romeoville was overflowing with a record number of freshmen students this fall – so much so that administrators at the Romeoville university had to put students on a dorm waiting list.

Enrollment down at JJC and other community colleges (Herald News)
JOLIET – Joliet Junior College has seen enrollment for full-time students drop steadily during the past five years, following a national trend tied to the economy.

Reprieve on Default Rates (Inside Higher Ed)
Colleges with large populations of low-income students have for months worried that their former students' high rates of default on student loans would eliminate their access to student aid under stricter federal standards that fully take effect this year.

In a flash, UI game officials acted (News-Gazette)
It lasted 1 hour, 44 minutes and 6 seconds (plus a 10-minute warm-up period).

Chief information officer at UI to speak at Champaign library (News-Gazette)
Mark Henderson, the new chief information officer at the University of Illinois, will speak at 2 p.m. Saturday at the Champaign Public Library, 200 W. Green St., C.

U of I chancellor hears from faculty about dismissed professor (Springfield State Journal-Register)
University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign campus Chancellor Phyllis Wise told faculty members that she is proud the school can have the kind of "difficult, uncomfortable" debate about the decision not to hire a professor over his profane, anti-Israel Twitter messages. Read more: http://www.sj-r.com/article/20140923/News/140929808#ixzz3EFdi1e4N

Student Loan Defaults Decline, Education Dept. Reports (The New York Times)
For the first time in years, defaults on federal student loan have declined, but they remain far above prerecession levels, the Department of Education reported on Wednesday.

Campus Police Acquire Military Weapons (The New York Times)
Should the campus police at the University of Central Florida ever need a modified grenade launcher, one sits waiting in the department’s armory.

Academic Skills on Web Are Tied to Income Level (The New York Times)
Wealthier students tend to perform better on tests of reading comprehension than their poorer peers, a longstanding trend that has been documented amply.

John A. Logan College ordered to repay $1.7 million (The Southern Illinoisan)
John A. Logan College is being forced to repay $1.7 million received in reimbursement for credit hours earned for courses taken at the the Community Health Education Complex.

Student leaders develop new task force to stop campus violence (The Southern Illinoisan)
SIU student leaders announced Tuesday a student task force to prevent future incidents of sexual assault and street violence.

September 23, 2014

Quote of the day:
“Many people are good at talking about what they are doing, but in fact do little. Others do a lot but don't talk about it; they are the ones who make a community live.”
Jean Vanier

Building a Better Major-Gifts Officer (Chronicle of Higher Education)
Colleges are increasingly reliant on the big gift.

Start Up, Slow Down (Chronicle of Higher Education)
Just before Christmas this past year, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology had a recommendation for Natalya Brikner, one of its aerospace engineers and doctoral students: If she wanted to get her ambitious start-up company off the ground, using the university's own patents, it was time to drop out.

Completion Strategies Must Accommodate Students’ Varying Needs (Chronicle of Higher Education)
“Uncluttering the Pathway to the Diploma” (The Chronicle, September 18) details a report by the Center for Community College Student Engage that synthesized the myriad of strategies offered to educators, each claiming to be most effective.

One ‘Test-Blind’ College’s Mission: ‘Be Our Own Best Self’ (Chronicle of Higher Education)
“The Hottest Seat on Campus” (The Chronicle, September 15) conveyed the realities of changing demographics and shrinking budgets.

University of Illinois donations jump 10 percent (Crain's Chicago Business)
(AP) — The University of Illinois Foundation said Monday that it received $259.5 million in donations during the fiscal year that ended June 30, a 10.5 percent increase over the previous fiscal year.

U of I Foundation donations are up 10 percent (Daily Herald)
The University of Illinois Foundation said Monday that it received $259.5 million in donations during the fiscal year that ended June 30, a 10.5 percent increase over the previous fiscal year.

NIU breaks ground on $27M building renovation (Daily Herald)
Northern Illinois University held a ceremonial groundbreaking Monday for a $27 million renovation of the facility that houses performing arts, theater and other departments.

Wesleyan University Orders Fraternities to Become Coed (Diverse Issues in Higher Education)
Wesleyan University in Connecticut on Monday ordered its fraternities with houses on campus to become coeducational within the next three years.

Recent Attention on Athletes Not an Indictment of Black Men (Diverse Issues in Higher Education)
Recent high-profile legal struggles of NFL running backs Ray Rice (formerly of the Baltimore Ravens) and Adrian Peterson (Minnesota Vikings) and Carolina Panthers defensive end Greg Hardy have ignited new rounds of discourse about aggression—in professional athletes and among Black males in general. Numerous think pieces and sports talk segments have tried to draw a correlation to the broader population.

Student Advocacy Group Calls for Changes to Work-Study (Inside Higher Ed)
The Federal Work-Study Program needs to be revamped to help serve more low-income students, says a report released Monday by Young Invincibles, a student advocacy group.

Economist Cancels Illinois Lecture Due to Salaita Decision (Inside Higher Ed)
Steve Cicala, an assistant professor of economics at the University of Chicago, says he has canceled the lecture he was scheduled to deliver to the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign's College of Business next month.

Student loan debt curbs housing market by $83 billion, study says (Los Angeles Times)
here’s been lots of debate lately in housing circles about the impact of student debt on home ownership..

Medicare-eligible rock star comes to WIU (McDonough County, The Voice)
"Where can I find her, a woman like that?" Read more: http://www.mcdonoughvoice.com/article/20140916/News/140919455#ixzz3E9XKy1gs

Students, faculty air their opinions on Salaita case at academic senate's first (News-Gazette)
Standing in the front of a crowded ballroom filled with University of Illinois faculty and students, Chancellor Phyllis Wise said she was proud the university is home to "difficult, uncomfortable and sometimes contentious discussions."

Up next for UI trustees: Decision on Kilgore (News-Gazette)
Coming off the controversial decision to reject scholar Steven Salaita, the University of Illinois Board of Trustees will next weigh in on James Kilgore's future employment on campus.

Chancellor's critics line up, let her have it (News-Gazette)
If denunciation is good for the soul, University of Illinois Chancellor Phyllis Wise received a thorough moral cleansing Monday.

Fiscal 2014 a record year for UI gifts (News-Gazette)
The University of Illinois and its foundation collected a record $259.5 million in donations in fiscal 2014, according to new figures from the UI.

In-state students opt away from UI, but Chinese students eager to enroll (News-Gazette)
The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC) is one of the world's great graduate research centers.

Bradley's Institute for Principled Leadership in Public Service plans to honor Ray LaHood (Peoria Journal Star)
The Institute for Principled Leadership in Public Service at Bradley University plans to honor former congressman and U.S. Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood. Read more: http://www.pjstar.com/article/20140923/News/140929754#ixzz3E9Qp74GN

Bradley University refines its sexual assault policy (Peoria Journal Star)
A nationwide push for sexual assault education on campuses has prompted Bradley University to update its policies and add them to student handbooks in an effort to increase transparency.. Read more: http://www.pjstar.com/article/20140922/News/140929788#ixzz3E9RwVgIL

Commentary: College visits givestudents better idea of campuslife (Springfield State Journal-Register)
As a senior in high school, I’m pretty familiar with the typical college spiel. Read more: http://www.sj-r.com/article/20140922/Entertainment & Life/140929875#ixzz3E9E5A3fa

NIU begins $27M arts building renovation (Springfield State Journal-Register)
Northern Illinois University held a ceremonial groundbreaking Monday for a $27 million renovation of the facility that houses performing arts, theater and other departments. Read more: http://www.sj-r.com/article/20140923/News/140929819#ixzz3E9Avk46c

UIS’ Walker fulfills lifelong ambition by becoming head basketball coach (Springfield State Journal-Register)
Bill Walker can celebrate his 50th birthday knowing he achieved a lifelong goal earlier in 2014. Read more: http://www.sj-r.com/article/20140922/Sports/140929838#ixzz3E9BWV0Vg

Logan County students to get entrepreneurship program (Springfield State Journal-Register)
About 20 Logan County students next fall will take part in course designed to introduce entrepreneurship to teenagers. Read more: http://www.sj-r.com/article/20140922/News/140929829#ixzz3E9CHdOh8

Preliminary College of Medicine OK’d by Faculty Senate (The Daily Illini)
The Urbana-Champaign Faculty Senate approved a preliminary proposal to create an engineering-based College of Medicine at its Monday meeting.

Common Core can help English learners in California, new study says (The Hechinger Report)
The rigorous new Common Core standards represent both a daunting challenge and a promising pathway that could help close the achievement gap for the growing number of American students who enter school knowing little or no English.

Teach For America’s soft-power education reform strategy (The Hechinger Report)
Babak Mostaghimi never expected to settle down in the rural Mississippi Delta.

Candidate’s Vow to Kill Tuition Law Makes Some in His Party Squirm (The New York Times)
If elected lieutenant governor in November, State Senator Dan Patrick, a Republican, has vowed to work to repeal the law that allows undocumented students to pay in-state tuition at Texas community colleges and universities.

SIU student leaders to announce initiative to address violence (The Southern Illinoisan)
After several serious incidents of reported violence resulting in the arrests of at least eight SIU students in recent weeks, student leaders are expected to announce today a new initiative related to violence on and around campus.

Op-ed: Change Is Critical to the Future of Higher Education (U.S. News & World Report)
I am asked all the time about what I see for the future of higher education. Unfortunately, I think it will look a lot like it does today, because most institutions are resistant to any real change. Nevertheless, fundamental change is needed in several key areas.

College of Tomorrow: The Changing Demographics of the Student Body (U.S. News & World Report)
Pick up a brochure or go to nearly any college web site – private, public, community college – and the first images you’re likely to see plenty of images of fresh-faced white kids (and perhaps a sprinkling of black and Asian teens), huddled in a lab or hanging on the quad, representing the student body on their campus.

September 22, 2014

Quote of the day:
“Inaction saps the vigor of the mind.”
Leonardo da Vinci

ITT shares plunge 34 percent on notice from SEC (Bloomberg.com)
ITT Educational Services Inc., an operator of for-profit colleges, said it received a notice that the U.S. Securities & Exchange Commission may take enforcement action related to its loans to students.

Salaita case likely to be hot topic today on campus (Bloomington Pantagraph)
Assault prevention program set for ISU

Start Up, Slow Down (Chronicle of Higher Education)
ust before Christmas this past year, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology had a recommendation for Natalya Brikner, one of its aerospace engineers and doctoral students: If she wanted to get her ambitious start-up company off the ground, using the university's own patents, it was time to drop out.

Admissions Leaders Gather to Weigh ‘Prestige, Financial Aid, and Love’ (Chronicle of Higher Education)
Gray areas, pink hair, and a silver scooter.

How Vengeance Evolved Into Law (Chronicle of Higher Education)
This is an exciting time to be in the brain business.

Why Freud Still Haunts Us (Chronicle of Higher Education)
For those of us prone to commemorations, it is a rich season. The beginning of the Great War 100 years ago, 70 years since the Normandy invasion, and the 50th anniversary of several major events in the American struggle for civil rights.

ISU president gives upbeat assessment of school (Daily Herald)
The president of Illinois State University gave an upbeat assessment of the school's future, saying Thursday the school has the capacity for moderate growth that can be achieved with increased diversity

New Oakton building named for retiring President Margaret Lee (Daily Herald)
Oakton Community College's board of trustees have formally approved a resolution naming the new Science and Health Careers Center in honor of retiring President Margaret B. Lee.

After Leaving UNCF, Labor Union Goes With Thurgood Marshall College Fund (Diverse Issues in Higher Education)
One of the largest labor unions in the country has decided to partner with the Thurgood Marshall College Fund to provide scholarships and other educational opportunities to students, after severing its ties with the United Negro College Fund (UNCF) over its decision to accept money from the controversial Koch brothers.

Board Chairman Defends University of Illinois Job Denial to Professor (Diverse Issues in Higher Education)
The University of Illinois was right to deny a faculty job to a professor whose anti-Israel Twitter messages were considered by some to be anti-Semitic, University of Illinois Board of Trustees Chairman Chris Kennedy said in a newspaper interview published Friday.

THUMBS UP! (Herald & Review)
To the University of Illinois Extension office for creating the Family Mealtime Challenge.

New Data on U.S. Graduate Enrollments (Inside Higher Ed)
First-time enrollment at U.S. graduate schools increased by 1 percent between fall 2012 and 2013, driven by 11.5 percent growth in new international students and despite a 0.9 percent decrease in U.S. citizens and permanent residents

'It's On Us' (Inside Higher Ed)
The White House launched a major public awareness campaign about campus sexual assault on Friday -- the aim of which, President Obama said, is no less than to "fundamentally shift" how the country thinks about campus sexual assault.

A House Divided (Inside Higher Ed)
The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign definitively told Steven Salaita this month that he was out of a job there.

EIU trustees OK program, hear recruitment update (Journal Gazette & Times-Courier)
CHARLESTON -- The first Eastern Illinois University Board of Trustees meeting of the semester brought with it some renewed and updated contracts. Trustees unanimously approved these contracts, along with a new degree program, Friday.

DACC board to vote on bond issue for tech upgrades (News-Gazette)
The Danville Area Community College board on Tuesday could take a step toward issuing up to $1 million in technology and equipment bonds to update computers and other equipment across campus.

Educators push college completion (Northwest Indiana Times)
A number of initiatives have been put in place to make college completion a reality, inline with the goal of the Indiana Commission for Higher Education that 60 percent of Hoosiers obtain credentials or degrees beyond high school by 2025.

Washington U. preserving Ferguson materials (St. Louis Post-Dispatch)
Washington University Libraries, is collecting and preserving photographs, video and other content as part of their “Documenting Ferguson,” initiative

Mizzou offering early retirement plans to faculty (St. Louis Post-Dispatch)
The University of Missouri-Columbia is offering nearly 300 retirement-age faculty members and administrators the chance to walk away with a one-time payout in exchange for retiring between Dec. 31 and Aug. 31

Do college freshman reading lists have a political bias? (St. Louis Post-Dispatch)
Freshmen at colleges around the country have for years been assigned to read the same books as a way to bond at orientation and to encourage intellectual interactions rather than just social ones

Washington University seeks to boost low-income enrollment (St. Louis Post-Dispatch)
Washington University’s rise from a local school to one of the country’s elite institutions was boosted by taking scholarship and grant money that might have gone to low-income students and instead targeting wealthier ones

Teach For America’s soft-power education reform strategy (The Hechinger Report)
Babak Mostaghimi never expected to settle down in the rural Mississippi Delta. A native of Virginia, he graduated from Johns Hopkins University in 2006 with a high-paying job offer as a defense contractor at a consulting firm.

WH hears regs to crack down on for-profit colleges (The Hill)
The Education Department has submitted to the White House highly anticipated regulations meant to crack down on colleges that saddle students with debt without preparing them for the job market.

Obama Unveils Push for Young People to Do More Against Campus Assaults (The New York Times)
WASHINGTON — President Obama has tried to use the power of his office to combat sexual assaults on college campuses. On Friday, he got some help.

Why Federal College Ratings Won’t Rein In Tuition (The New York Times)
College costs have been rising for decades. Slowing — or even better, reversing — that trend would get more people into college and help reduce student debt.

Opinion: Why poor students struggle (The New York Times)


Why Federal College Ratings Won’t Rein In Tuition (The New York Times)
College costs have been rising for decades. Slowing — or even better, reversing — that trend would get more people into college and help reduce student debt. The Obama administration is working on an ambitious plan intended to rein in college costs, and it deserves credit for tackling this tough job.

NIU budget transparency ‘revolutionary:’ Butler (The Northern Star)
The university’s internal budget is a “revolutionary document” in its transparency, according to the chair of the Board of Trustees.

SIU boasts long list of achievements (The Southern Illinoisan)
Interim Chancellor Paul Sarvela began his State of the University Address with a listing of SIU student and faculty achievements from the past year

Parker: Dunn responds quickly to sexual assault incidences on campus (The Southern Illinoisan)


Sexual assault suspects not yet charged by state's attorney (The Southern Illinoisan)


Infographic: Paying for College (U.S. News & World Report)
College costs are – no surprise here – on the rise again. The U.S. News Best Colleges rankings, released last week, include a wealth of information about paying for college, which is at the forefront of most families' minds as they fret over the often high price of a degree.

Free community college: Coming soon to Oregon? (USA TODAY)
Oregon lawmakers are currently exploring a proposal that could make community college free to the state’s residents.

September 19, 2014

Quote of the day:
"Keep your fears to yourself, but share your courage with others."
Robert Louis Stevenson

Building on Competency-Based Education Campus Technology (Campus Technology)
Argosy University System is among the first institutions in a movement toward competency-based education, creating new models of direct assessment that promise to reduce time-to-degree and offer greater relevance for graduates in the job market.

Scholar Behind U. of Illinois Boycotts Is a Longtime Activist (Chronicle of Higher Education)
On a Friday night in early August, Corey Robin put out a call on his blog. There had been plenty of grumbling over the University of Illinois’s decision to revoke a job offer to Steven G. Salaita, who gained notoriety for incendiary tweets about Israel

What a Consumer Watchdog's Suit Against Corinthian Could Mean for Other Colleges (Chronicle of Higher Education)
It’s a pretty safe bet that the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau won’t see much of the half-billion-plus dollars it demanded from Corinthian Colleges Inc., in a lawsuit the bureau filed on Tuesday that accused the company of predatory lending and illegal collection tactics.

Northwestern Law sets record $150 million fundraising goal (Crain's Chicago Business)
Northwestern University's School of Law said today that it plans to raise $150 million in its largest-ever capital campaign and would earmark just over half — $80 million — for student financial aid.

Illinois Innocence Project awarded $250K grant (Daily Herald)
A project at the University of Illinois Springfield that is dedicated to investigating wrongful convictions has been awarded a grant from the U.S. Department of Justice.

Editorial: Time for COD trustees to see all spending, as other boards do (Daily Herald)
Whenever someone says, essentially, "That's the way we've always done it" when something is questioned, it's a red flag.

COD's Breuder gets faculty 'no confidence' vote (Daily Herald)
The union representing College of DuPage's 306 full-time faculty members announced Thursday a first-time "no confidence" vote in the leadership of President Robert Breuder, blaming him for helping create "an environment of turmoil, distrust, fear and intimidation."

DuPage Faculty Votes 'No Confidence' in President (Inside Higher Ed)
College of DuPage's full-time faculty union has voted "no confidence" in college President Robert L. Breuder, 189 to 53. Glenn Hansen, president of the National Education Association-affiliated union and a DuPage photography instructor, said Breuder has contributed to an atmosphere of "distrust" on campus.

Fight Over Digital Accessibility (Inside Higher Ed)
Advocates for students with disabilities and groups representing colleges and universities are sparring over federal legislation that would set new standards for accessible technology on campuses.

Wage Data Done Right (Inside Higher Ed)
Measuring the job-market returns of college credentials is complex work, according to researchers who gathered here this week for a meeting on higher education data. That makes it challenging, or even risky, for policy makers to use those metrics to hold colleges accountable.

Degree, contracts up for EIU trustee discussion (Journal Gazette & Times-Courier)
CHARLESTON -- A new master's degree program could be one step closer to fruition after today's Eastern Illinois University Board of Trustees meeting. The M.S. in Health Promotion and Leadership will go before the board during the meeting. According to board documents, the program will aim to enroll 20 students each year and funding will be provided from an Academic Affairs division reallocation.

North Central College begins academic year with near-record number of students (Naperville Sun)
North Central College began the 2014-2015 academic year Sept. 15 with a near-record number of students. Total enrollment is a near-record 2,800 undergraduates and 250 graduate students—3,050 total—eclipsing the 3,000 mark for the third straight year. The College welcomed 860 new full-time undergraduate students, up from 852 a year ago

Kennedy: We did the right thing (News-Gazette)
CHAMPAIGN — Board of Trustees Chairman Chris Kennedy insisted Thursday that the University of Illinois respects academic freedom and offered no apologies for the decision to deny a faculty job to controversial professor Steven Salaita.

Kennedy: Fix UIC med school before adding one in Urbana (News-Gazette)
CHAMPAIGN — A separate medical school at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign could be a "game changer" for the campus, but the UI should fix problems with its existing medical center in Chicago first, Chris Kennedy said Thursday.

Corinthian Colleges Debts Get Paid As Occupy Wall Street Shows Them the Money (Rockford Register Star)
While the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) has gone to court for what could be a protracted legal fight with for-profit Corinthian Colleges , Occupy Wall Street --OWS--has opened up its checkbook to pay off Corinthian student debt .

Illinois Innocence Project awarded $250K grant (Springfield State Journal-Register)
A project at the University of Illinois Springfield that is dedicated to investigating wrongful convictions has been awarded a grant from the U.S. Department of Justice. Read more: http://www.sj-r.com/article/20140918/News/140919462#ixzz3Dm6Ox04z

Obama to Announce Campaign to Prevent Campus Sexual Assaults (The New York Times)
WASHINGTON — President Obama has tried to use the power of his office to combat sexual assaults on college campuses. On Friday, he is getting some help.

Voice of The Southern: International students boosting SIU Carbondale (The Southern Illinoisan)
One of the bright spots in recent news about modest enrollment growth at SIU Carbondale was the impressive jump in the number of international students coming to Southern Illinois.

September 18, 2014

Quote of the day:
“Where all think alike, no one thinks much.”
Walter Lippman

Waubonsie Valley grad tackles student loan debt crisis (Beacon News)
After spending time talking with Sean Anderson, two things immediately crossed my mind. I hope politics never change his passion. And, boy, would his mother be proud. Anderson is only 22, still a junior in college.

SWIC board votes to terminate PSOP executive director (Belleville News-Democrat)
Southwestern Illinois College trustees voted unanimously Wednesday night to terminate the contract of Elizabeth Zurliene, who served for 21/2 years as the executive director of the school's Programs and Services for Older Persons agency. Read more here: http://www.bnd.com/2014/09/17/3407455_swic-board-votes-to-terminate.html?sp=/99/100/&rh=1#storylink=cpy

University Center of Lake County Solves Print Management Headaches with Self-Serve Stations (Campus Technology)
University Center of Lake County (UCLC), a satellite campus facility serving 19 colleges and universities in Illinois, has made it easier for students, faculty and corporate visitors to access copy and print services, while reducing administrative overhead for its staff.

North Central College launches new media studies department (Chicago Tribune)
North Central College is launching a new media studies department this fall to prepare students for the increasingly dynamic media field. The new department combines journalism, broadcast communication and interactive media studies (IMS). The popular IMS major blends art, computer science, English and communication. .

So Your College Offers Students an ‘Employment Guarantee’?* (Chronicle of Higher Education)
Most students hope to have a job lined up by the time they finish college. But the job market for new graduates remains pretty tight. In this uncertain world, wouldn’t it be nice to have some insurance?

Scholars Take Aim at Student Evaluations’ ‘Air of Objectivity’ (Chronicle of Higher Education)
Student course evaluations are often misused statistically and shed little light on the quality of teaching, two scholars at the University of California at Berkeley argue in the draft of a new paper.

After Illinois’s Administrative Fiasco, Questions Remain (Chronicle of Higher Education)
The summary dismissal of Steven G. Salaita from an offered tenured position at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign over posts on his Twitter account critical of Israel’s military actions against Palestinians in Gaza has been quite a roller-coaster ride, and faculty members elsewhere appear to be bracing for their turn.

Uncluttering the Pathway to the Diploma (Chronicle of Higher Education)
Community-college students who register for their college-level classes before the term begins are 11 times more likely to persist into their second year, while students whose instructors enforce strict attendance policies are nearly three times as likely to complete remedial-mathematics courses.

A Chronicle Reporter Wrote a Book About the Higher-Ed Crisis. These 5 Things Surprised Her the Most. (Chronicle of Higher Education)
College is often seen as central to the American Dream, a pathway to upward mobility for rich and poor alike.

What a Consumer Watchdog's Suit Against Corinthian Could Mean for Other Colleges (Chronicle of Higher Education)
It’s a pretty safe bet that the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau won’t see much of the half-billion-plus dollars it demanded from Corinthian Colleges Inc., in a lawsuit the bureau filed on Tuesday that accused the company of predatory lending and illegal collection tactics.

A Passion to Highlight Which Colleges Do Well by Low-Income Students (Chronicle of Higher Education)
The question of which colleges serve low-income students well has gotten a lot of attention this year, thanks in part to a White House summit, in January, and a new spin on college rankings, released by The New York Times this month.

Commentary: After Illinois’s Administrative Fiasco, Questions Remain (Chronicle of Higher Education)
The summary dismissal of Steven G. Salaita from an offered tenured position at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign over posts on his Twitter account critical of Israel’s military actions against Palestinians in Gaza has been quite a roller-coaster ride, and faculty members elsewhere appear to be bracing for their turn

Our View: Numbers behind enrollment decline (Dekalb Daily Chronicle)
With the way costs for students are increasing each year, we shouldn’t be surprised that enrollment at Northern Illinois University is hitting historic lows.

NIU students discuss why they leave campus on weekends (Dekalb Daily Chronicle)
Before he ever set foot on the Northern Illinois University campus, freshman Angelo Gonzalez knew he would spend every other weekend with his family and friends in Chicago.

Beacon College Leading the Way in Service of Learning Disabled (Diverse Issues in Higher Education)
After trying out several colleges, Andrew Marvin found himself at Beacon College. Marvin, who has ADHD, says that Beacon was the only school that was able to meet his particular learning needs. The unique institution, located in Leesburg, Florida, is one of a handful of colleges that accept only learning disabled students.

Centre College Program Aimed at First-Generation Students (Diverse Issues in Higher Education)
The largest single gift in Centre College’s nearly 200-year history will create a new scholarship program for first-generation students, the liberal arts college announced.

Roosevelt University Student Appointed to Illinois State Board of Higher Education (eMediaWire)
Sean Anderson, a 22-year-old business management major at Roosevelt University, has been appointed as a student board member on the Illinois Board of Higher Education (IBHE). After his first board meeting last month, Anderson, a native of Naperville, Ill., said his aim as a board member is to work with IBHE and Illinois lawmakers in finding remedies for the growing student-loan debt crisis.

Richland marks U.S. Constitution's 227th anniversary (Herald & Review)
Life would be a lot different for Quanisha Turner if 39 men hadn't signed a piece of paper in a stuffy room 227 years ago.

More Pressure Than Ever: The 2014 Survey of College and University Admissions Directors (Inside Higher Ed)
Last year was a difficult one for college admissions -- with institutions reporting more and more difficulty filling their classes.

Bill Targets U.S. Education Research (Inside Higher Ed)
The U.S. Senate’s education committee on Wednesday unanimously approved an education research bill over the objection of some researchers who said they’re concerned about the changes it makes to how federal education research is overseen.

High Impact, Low Participation (Inside Higher Ed)
Community colleges now have solid data on which strategies work best to help students get to graduation. While more colleges are using those techniques, far too few students are benefiting from them.

EIU recognized by national organizations (Journal Gazette & Times-Courier)
CHARLESTON (JG-TC) -- Eastern Illinois University has been recognized for its civic engagement by NASPA, Student Affairs Professionals in Higher Education. The university is one of nearly 100 colleges and universities named a Lead Institution by the organization, according to an EIU press release. Vice President for Student Affairs Dan Nadler said in the release this is the second consecutive year the school has been invited to participate in NASPA's network.

Lake Land College completes grant cycle (Journal Gazette & Times-Courier)
MATTOON (JG-TC) -- The Lake Land College Grant Office has completed another year of grant projects, bringing in more than $1.1 million in grant funding for the college, according to a press release.

UI professor wins 'genius grant' (News-Gazette)
A University of Illinois environmental engineer who is measuring the effects of soot on global climate and human health has won a MacArthur Foundation "genius grant."

UI professor: MacArthur award 'completely blindsided me' (News-Gazette)
Walking back to her office after class a few weeks ago, engineering Professor Tami Bond got a call on her cell phone from an unfamiliar Chicago number.

Parkland Foundation scholarship winners (News-Gazette)
The Parkland College Foundation has announced the following area scholarship recipients for the 2014-2015 academic year.

Colleges let taxpayers help poor students while they go after rich, report says (The Hechinger Report)
In what it calls “an elaborate shell game,” universities and colleges are shifting their financial aid from low-income students to high-income ones to bolster their prestige and raise them up the rankings, a new report says.

Opinion: Student leaders should utilize campus calendar (The Northern Star)
NIU’s calendar site is supposed to be a tool for exposing people to organizations, promoting diversity among groups, but those groups aren’t using it enough.

Board of Trustees to discuss future projects, consider budget approval (The Northern Star)
The Board of Trustees will consider approving a university request for state funding to renovate several academic buildings at its meeting today.

Six arrested in two separate sexual assaults at SIU (The Southern Illinoisan)
Six SIU students were arrested this past weekend in connection with two alleged sexual assault incidents on the campus.

Matchmaking through technology: The coming revolution in college admissions (The Washington Post)
The old model that colleges used to recruit, through mass mailings to promising students and selective visits to key high schools, is giving way to sophisticated matchmaking tools of technology.

More students are illegally downloading college textbooks for free (The Washington Post)
It’s hard (if not impossible) to know just how prevalent this practice is, but some college students around the country are uploading their expensive college textbooks onto the Internet so other students can download them for free and avoid the hefty fees that are sometimes more than $200 a book.

September 17, 2014

Quote of the day:
“Imagination is the source of every form of human achievement. And it’s the one thing that I believe we are systematically jeopardizing in the way we educate our children and ourselves.”
Sir Ken Robinson

Faculty group endorse U of I medical school plan (Bloomington Pantagraph)
A committee of faculty members at the University of Illinois' Urbana-Champaign campus has endorsed a proposal to build a new medical school

Commentary: Give Illinois students a choice (Chicago Tribune)
his academic year we are sending 258,580 Illinois children into schools that will fail to bring 60 percent of them to grade-level by June. Of those who do graduate from high school in four years, fewer than 20 percent will be considered "college ready." And that's with funding to public schools in excess of $13,000 per student (not including state funding for after-school programs, construction grants, targeted initiatives or pension payments). Is that acceptable to you?.

Griffin: College of DuPage spent $26 million without board scrutiny (Daily Herald)
Over the past 16 months, the College of DuPage has paid more than $26 million without the board of trustees knowing specifically how the money was spent.

The Most And Least Educated Cities In America (Forbes)
Which cities are the nation’s best and brightest calling home these days?

'Undermining Pell' (Inside Higher Ed)
Hundreds of colleges charge low-income students tuition that is half or more of their household’s entire yearly income, according to a report released today by the New America Foundation that seeks to shed light on colleges’ aid practices and to prod Congress to change the structure of Pell Grants.

Sharing Intel on Completion (Inside Higher Ed)
A new coalition of 11 large public research universities plans to work together on techniques to improve their graduation rates, particularly for lower-income students.

Consumer Agency Sues Corinthian (Inside Higher Ed)
Federal regulators on Tuesday sued Corinthian Colleges, accusing the embattled for-profit education company of setting up a predatory student loan scheme and then illegally harassing borrowers in an attempt to collect that debt.

Professors Win MacArthur 'Genius' Fellowships (Inside Higher Ed)
Ten professors were among the 21 people named as the latest class of MacArthur Fellows.

UI professor wins 'genius grant' (News-Gazette)
A University of Illinois environmental engineer who is measuring the effects of soot on global climate and human health has won a MacArthur Foundation "genius grant."

Too Few University Jobs For America's Young Scientists (NPR)
Imagine a job where about half of all the work is being done by people who are in training. That's, in fact, what happens in the world of biological and medical research.

Letter: Evaluating the cost of education (Springfield State Journal-Register)
We have heard a lot of conversation recently about the out-of-control cost of higher education and what are “we” going to do about making it more affordable

Corinthian Colleges sued over predatory lending scheme (St. Louis Post-Dispatch)
Corinthian Colleges is being sued by the federal Consumer Financial Protection Bureau for what it calls a “predatory lending scheme.”

Purdue: Colleges must do better for low-income students (The Indianapolis Star)
How can we do better? Purdue University and 10 other public universities across the country will ask that question together in an alliance announced today to better serve low-income and first-generation college students.

Championship debate team shows off skills tonight (The Southern Illinoisan)
-- The public will get a glimpse of a national championship program in action tonight.

U of I chancellor regrets uproar over professor (The Southern Illinoisan)
University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign Chancellor Phyllis Wise told a committee of faculty leaders that she regretted the uproar caused by the decision not hire a professor whose Twitter messages were considered by some to be anti-Semitic.

Washington: An education capital (The Washington Post)
Washington, known as a seat of global power, is also a center for brainpower. A new ranking finds the D.C. metropolitan area to be third in the nation in level of educational attainment — behind No. 1 Ann Arbor, Mich., and No. 2 Madison, Wis., but ahead of Boston, Seattle, New York and many other cities.

September 16, 2014

Quote of the day:
“Teaching is not a lost art, but the regard for it is a lost tradition.”
Jacques Barzun

Op-ed: U. of I. did right, but maybe for wrong reasons (Chicago Sun-Times)
Despite all the debate over the University of Illinois’ refusal to let Professor Steven Salaita teach because many have found his tweets offensive, the real issue in the case has gone unaddressed.

Odds favor Chicago sites — U. of C. or UIC — for Obama library (Chicago Sun-Times)
WASHINGTON — The finalists for the Obama library and museum announced Monday — the University of Chicago, the University of Illinois at Chicago, Columbia University and the University of Hawaii — face a very heavy lift to win the competition.

In Quest for Success, Colleges Ask: What’s Working (Chronicle of Higher Education)
ith the pressure on for higher graduation rates, better retention, and more-engaged students, colleges are deploying a variety of tactics in their pursuit of student success. But whether they’re offering a first-year experience or a flipped classroom, how do they know if the programs are working?

New 11-University Alliance Plans Efforts to Help Graduate More Needy Students (Chronicle of Higher Education)
Eleven public research universities around the country that enroll some of the most economically and racially diverse student bodies in the nation have formed a collaboration aimed at increasing the numbers of low-income students who start and graduate from college.

4 Key Questions Experts Are Asking About Obama’s College-Ratings Plan (Chronicle of Higher Education)
President Obama’s proposed federal college-ratings system is set to be released in time for the 2015 academic year, but if the comments from administrators and researchers at a hearing on Friday are anything to go by, the plan appears to be far from complete.

Editorial: When does a professor cross the line? (Dekalb Daily Chronicle)
A university should include faculty with a wide range of views, even controversial ones, and they shouldn’t be penalized for expressing them.

Editorial: Move pension issue on to `fast track' (Herald & Review)
It may be good for everyone if the state's pension overhaul were put on the so-called ``fast track.'' It appears the the pension reform approved by the General Assembly last spring is doomed for a defeat in court. If that's the case, the faster that decision is rendered, the better for taxpayers

Lake Land College plans Transfer Day (Journal Gazette & Times-Courier)
More than 25 colleges and universities from throughout Illinois will attend the event to discuss transfer options to four-year colleges or universities. Additionally, opportunities to discuss admission requirements, special major requirements, tuition costs and disability services will be available

Redesigning Remedial Math (National Journal)
Nationwide, remedial math is a major academic barrier to community-college students graduating. But a new partnership between the University of Texas (Austin) and the state's community colleges—called the New Mathways Project—aims to get more students up to speed, faster, by rethinking how math is taught.

Wise regrets polarization over Salaita (News-Gazette)
URBANA — In a meeting with a campus governance committee Monday, University of Illinois Chancellor Phyllis Wise said she regrets the polarization that has occurred on campus as a result of the Steven Salaita case, and she should have consulted with more people, including those in American Indian Studies.

Chicago tops list of Obama library finalists (POLITICO)
The foundation tasked with planning Barack Obama’s presidential library has narrowed down the list of potential hosts to four finalists, with the University of Chicago widely seen as the most likely choice. The University of Illinois at Chicago, Columbia University and the University of Hawaii are the three other finalists that have been asked to respond Read more: http://www.politico.com/story/2014/09/barack-obama-presidential-library-chicago-110970.html#ixzz3DUNY0GKy

Warren Student Loan Refinance Bill on Tap Before Mid-Term Election (Rockford Register Star)
Senator Warren, who seemed to acknowledge the bill’s controversial features, said, “I’m never going to get this politician thing right, but we want to pass a law that will cover everybody, a law that would enable people to re-finance Federal Parent PLUS loans and private loans, too,” including those made by Sallie Mae — now Navient — and those from bank and non-bank lenders that charge rates which can run into double digits.

Recruitment efforts paying off for Illinois colleges (Springfield State Journal-Register)
Recruitment efforts targeting freshmen and international students are paying off for some Illinois colleges and universities, while others credit improving retention rates with maintaining steady enrollment. Fall 2014 enrollment at the University of Illinois Springfield, announced last week, grew by nearly 300 students to 5,431, making it the largest student body in UIS. Read more: http://www.sj-r.com/article/20140915/News/140919676#ixzz3DUhLs4pO

International enrollment is up sharply at SIUC (St. Louis Post-Dispatch)
Southern Illinois University-Carbondale saw its first enrollment increase in 10 years, thanks in large part to exploding international enrollment.

Tuition discount hopes to lure Hoosiers back to college (The Indianapolis Star)
When you're 30, the first day of school can feel a lot like every other day.

A National Admissions Office’ for Low-Income Strivers (The New York Times)
Arianna Trickey was opening a piece of mail in her bedroom during junior year of high school when a pamphlet fell out of the envelope. The pamphlet seemed to offer the impossible: the prospect of a full scholarship to several of her dream colleges.

For Inspiration in Creating College Ratings, Look to Health Care (The New York Times)
The Obama administration is preparing a system of college ratings that it hopes will improve college quality and hold down tuition by arming consumers with better information.

Oregon's tuition-free Pay it Forward plan should take a back seat (The Oregonian)
Oregon's Higher Education Coordinating Commission reiterated its position on Oregon's controversial tuition-free 'Pay It Forward' college finance proposal Thursday:

Free community college could cost Oregon taxpayers $250 million (The Oregonian)
A proposal to make community college free to Oregonians would cost the state from $10 million to $250 million a year, depending on which students are eligible and whether room and board are covered, national experts have concluded.

How much will college cost in 25 years? (USA TODAY)
Mounting college costs and student loan debts present a substantial dilemma for those planning to start families in the next few years: What will the cost, and value, of a college education look like 25 years down the line?

September 15, 2014

Quote of the day:
“If you can control your behavior when everything around you is out of control, you can model for your children a valuable lesson in patience and understanding...and snatch an opportunity to shape character.”
Jane Clayson Johnson

Area colleges roll out programs for everyone from construction professionals (Belleville News-Democrat)
Southern Illinois University Edwardsville has announced that it is now accepting registration for the 2015 session of its Construction Leadership Institute. Read more here: http://www.bnd.com/2014/09/10/3394730/area-colleges-roll-out-programs.html?sp=/99/166/179/175/#storylink=cpy

Ray Hartstein, co-ounder, first chairman of Oakton Community College, dead at 96 (Chicago Sun-Times)
Ray Hartstein, who co-founded Oakton Community College, died Sunday at 96 at his home in Vernon Hills.

The Hottest Seat on Campus (Chronicle of Higher Education)
Today’s enrollment officials need a mind for marketing and a nose for numbers. Thick skin helps, too.

In Quest for Success, Colleges Ask: What’s Working? (Chronicle of Higher Education)
With the pressure on for higher graduation rates, better retention, and more-engaged students, colleges are deploying a variety of tactics in their pursuit of student success.

Nearly 100 groups formschool funding coalition (Daily Herald)
Nearly 100 organizations are joining together to push Illinois lawmakers to pass a school funding reform proposal in the spring.

Diverse Docket: Kennedy-King College Fails to Win Dismissal (Diverse Issues in Higher Education)
A community college in Chicago must go to trial in a religious discrimination suit by a Muslim former faculty member who was denied tenure and terminated, a federal judge has ruled.

Boost for Need-Based Aid (Inside Higher Ed)
States last year doled out roughly the same amount of student aid money in 2012-13 as they did the previous year, but they increased the share of money flowing to students based on financial need, according to a new survey published Monday.

To Potential MFA Students: There Are No Academic Jobs (Inside Higher Ed)
I am nowhere near the first to say it, nor will I be the last, but to be clear: there is no sustainable career path in academia for MFA holders in creative writing.

Rauner’s education plan raises eyebrows (Springfield State Journal-Register)
Proposals to tie teacher merit pay to student test scores and alter tenure policies to make it easier to fire bad teachers are among the most recent education ideas being pushed in Illinois by Bruce Rauner, the Republican businessman challenging Democratic Gov. Pat Quinn this fall. Read more: http://www.sj-r.com/article/20140914/News/140919723#ixzz3DOSokzSe

Coaltion forms to push school funding reform (Springfield State Journal-Register)
Nearly 100 organizations are joining together to push Illinois lawmakers to pass a school funding reform proposal in the spring. Read more: http://www.sj-r.com/article/20140915/News/140919706#ixzz3DOWHJMU2

Freshmen enrollment drops at U of I (Springfield State Journal-Register)
Freshman enrollment at the University of Illinois' flagship campus is down this semester by 5.4 percent from a year ago, according to the school. Read more: http://www.sj-r.com/article/20140913/News/140919742#ixzz3DOX13nDv

Letter: Right move by the U of I (Springfield State Journal-Register)
I commend Chancellor Phyllis Wise and the University of Illinois board of trustees for knowing the difference between freedom of speech and hate rants. Read more: http://www.sj-r.com/article/20140914/Opinion/140919767#ixzz3DOYZqRGc

Susan Koch: Examples of excellence showcased in honorsprogram (Springfield State Journal-Register)
A front-page headline a few days ago in Springfield’s The State Journal-Register announced a record enrollment at the Springfield campus of the University of Illinois. Read more: http://www.sj-r.com/article/20140913/News/140919729#ixzz3DOZQ4IRT

September 12, 2014

Quote of the day:
“Live as if you were to die tomorrow. Learn as if you were to live forever.” ~~ Mahatma Gandhi Read more at: http://www.lightafire.com/quotations/attitude/page/4/
Mahatma Gandhi

IWU chaplain cites post-9/11 need for interfaith talk (Bloomington Pantagraph)
When Illinois Wesleyan University chaplain Elyse Nelson Winger thinks of the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks, she doesn't just remember the violence of that day or the eerily quiet skies above the Chicago area.

Obama library: 2 Chicago sites cut from list; U. of C. bid lives (Chicago Sun-Times)
ASHINGTON — Obama Presidential Library Foundation chief Martin Nesbitt is poised to announce the bid finalists next week with two Chicago sites without university affiliations — at Lakeside and Bronzeville — not advancing to the next round, I am told by multiple sources. The University of Chicago is expected to be on a shortlist of bidders who will be asked to submit a very detailed proposal for the library and museum.

Editorial: U. of I. right to reject prof's hate speech (Chicago Tribune)
Let's begin by stipulating that most of Steven Salaita's tweets about Israel are merely loathsome. As such, they aren't sufficient grounds to deny him a teaching job at the University of Illinois.. In that category we might include these:

More seniors are carrying student loan debt into retirement (Chicago Tribune)
WASHINGTON — Student loan debt doesn't only hurt the young. More seniors are carrying their college debt into retirement.. The total outstanding debt load held by seniors grew to $18.2 billion in 2013, up from $2.8 billion in 2005, according to a report released by the Government Accountability Office on Wednesday.

U. of I. trustees vote 8-1 to reject Salaita (Chicago Tribune)
RBANA -- The University of Illinois board of trustees voted Thursday not to hire controversial professor Steven Salaita, finalizing a decision that has created much backlash on campus and from academia nationwide..

U. of Illinois Board’s Denial of Job to Salaita Is Unlikely to Quell Controversy (Chronicle of Higher Education)
The University of Illinois’s Board of Trustees voted, 8 to 1, on Thursday to deny a professorship to Steven G. Salaita, a harsh critic of Israel, at a meeting in which some board members and guest speakers voiced fears that the institution was abandoning academic freedom and others called Mr. Salaita a potential threat to students.

Salaita Case Exposes Frustrations With Chancellor’s Leadership Style (Chronicle of Higher Education)
In her contentious decision to rescind a job offer to a controversial scholar, Phyllis M. Wise has exposed the ramifications of a leadership style that some professors and students say is consultative on its surface but ultimately uncompromising.

What’s Next in the Steven Salaita Dispute? (Chronicle of Higher Education)
http://chronicle.com/section/Home/5

Investigators Say Education Dept. Has Ignored Dozens of Recommendations (Chronicle of Higher Education)
The Education Department has yet to respond to dozens of recommendations made by government investigators over the past decade, officials at two oversight agencies told members of Congress on Wednesday.

New Scholarly Books (Chronicle of Higher Education)
Weekly Book List, September 12, 2014

U of Illinois trustees won't hire professor (Daily Herald)
University of Illinois trustees on Thursday decided not to hire a professor who previously lost a job offer at the school because of anti-Israel Twitter messages.

Bartlett hires ECC's Spartan Consulting Group for marketing assignment (Daily Herald)
They have big-ticket clients and a professional look. So it's a bit of a surprise when you learn that the team behind the Spartan Consulting is really a group of students at Elgin Community College.

Tough Financial Love May Pay Off for Kentucky State University (Diverse Issues in Higher Education)
Taking the hard line with its finances, Kentucky State University released 645 of its students from enrollment for unpaid or neglected accounts on September 2. Just a week later, KSU has taken 452 of those students back.

AmeriCorps at 20 (Inside Higher Ed)
The last four U.S. presidents are joining together today to commemorate the 20th anniversary of the AmeriCorps national service program, through which more than 900,000 volunteers have delivered more than 1.2 billion hours of service in thousands of communities.

Officially Out of a Job (Inside Higher Ed)
Steven Salaita’s recent demands for a job at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign apparently fell on deaf ears, with the Board of Trustees of the Illinois system rejecting his candidacy for a tenured faculty appointment to the American Indian studies program Thursday.

What happens now after Salaita decision? (News-Gazette)
URBANA — Standing on the Quad among a crowd of faculty and students, some of them in tears and still chanting "Reinstate Salaita!", Robert Warrior considered this question: Is it over?

The U.S. gov. wants you to get the most from your college investment (PBS NewsHour)
Recently, Ted Mitchell, under secretary of education, sat down with the NewsHour to talk about the recent push for experimentation with competency-based college degree programs, the pending federal college rating system, concerns over growing student debt and other issues we examined.

U of I trustees OK $5.64B budget (Springfield State Journal-Register)
University of Illinois trustees on Thursday approved a $5.64 billion budget for the current fiscal year. That's an increase of $11.1 million, or 0.2 percent. Read more: http://www.sj-r.com/article/20140911/News/140919832#ixzz3D70b1c4Z

U of I trustees won't hire professor (Springfield State Journal-Register)
University of Illinois trustees on Thursday voted not to hire a professor whose anti-Israel Twitter messages were deemed anti-Semitic by some, raising the likelihood of a lawsuit or a financial deal with the professor and further campus protests. Read more: http://www.sj-r.com/article/20140911/News/140919873#ixzz3D70p7NVY

An Untapped Force in the Fight for Literacy (The New York Times)
People disagree, quite strenuously, on the best curriculum for teaching children to read. But all participants in the reading wars agree on some other things: Early reading is crucial — a child who does not read proficiently by third grade will probably fall further and further behind each year. American schools are failing: two out of three fourth graders don’t read at grade level.

That Selfie Is So Good, It Could Help You Pay for College (The New York Times)
WHEN 18-year-old Kiana Neisig added up her expenses for college, she found herself short of funds, even after receiving grants and student loans.

SIU ranks 189 of 268 national universities (The Southern Illinoisan)
A national news magazine ranks SIU 189th out of 268 national universities. The rankings were released by U.S. News and World Report in its Best Colleges edition.

SIU receives another award for veteran affairs (The Southern Illinoisan)
SIU received a special award for its work with veterans Thursday. Simon Wlodarski, deputy chief of staff with the Illinois Department of Veteran Affairs, presented SIU with the Governor's Award for Excellence in Veteran Education in Illinois for spring semester 2014.

Why not having a college degree is a bigger barrier than it used to be (The Washington Post)
Jeanne Marrin, 48, comes from what she calls an “HR family.”

September 11, 2014

Quote of the day:
“Every student can learn. Just not on the same day or in the same way.”
George Evans

Editorial: Continuous cuts hurt higher education, and students (Chicago Sun-Times)
University of Illinois officials last week said that a higher percentage of students accepted at the U. of I. are deciding to go elsewhere because financial aid is insufficient

Salaita to U. of Illinois: ‘Reinstate Me’ or Brace for Legal Fight (Chronicle of Higher Education)
Steven G. Salaita wants to continue fighting for a job at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and he’s ready to take legal action if he doesn’t get it.

In Cheeky Pushback, Colleges Razz Rate My Professors (Chronicle of Higher Education)
The Internet can be a nasty place, as academics know well from Rate My Professors.

Pleas for Civility Meet Cynicism (Chronicle of Higher Education)
"Civility" just might be academe’s newest fighting word.

Investigators Say Education Dept. Has Ignored Dozens of Recommendations (Chronicle of Higher Education)
The Education Department has yet to respond to dozens of recommendations made by government investigators over the past decade, officials at two oversight agencies told members of Congress on Wednesday.

Project Seeks to Ease Path to 4-Year Degree for Nontraditional Students (Chronicle of Higher Education)
The American Council on Education announced on Wednesday a project intended to make it easier for nontraditional students to earn four-year college degrees.

NIU sees increase in international students (Daily Herald)
An almost 30 percent increase in international students has helped Northern Illinois University record its lowest drop in enrollment in five years.

Caterpillar plans new lab at U. of Illinois (Daily Herald)
Caterpillar Inc. plans to open a new data analytics laboratory at the University of Illinois, the Peoria-based company announced this week.

College Affordability Metrics Don’t Match HBCUs’ Mission (Diverse Issues in Higher Education)
The current metric used by the Obama administration to measure college affordability does not rely on the critical role that historically Black colleges and universities play in educating traditionally underrepresented students, according to a new report released by the University of Pennsylvania’s Graduate School of Education’s Center for Minority Serving Institutions.

Senior Americans Burdened With Student Debt (Diverse Issues in Higher Education)
Rosemary Anderson could be 81 by the time she pays off her student loans. After struggling with divorce, health problems and an underwater home mortgage, the 57-year-old anticipates there could come a day when her Social Security benefits will be docked to make the payments.

For HBCUs, Investing in Education Abroad a Key to Marketplace Success (Diverse Issues in Higher Education)
The numbers show how under-represented students of color are when it comes to international experiences, but how can its increase also be connected to improving marketplace success?

`College degree required' becoming the norm (Herald & Review)
A new report finds that employers are increasingly requiring a bachelor's degree for positions that didn't used to require baccalaureate education.

Umbrella Group Backs Unbundling (Inside Higher Ed)
On Wednesday ACE announced the creation of a pool of about 100 online courses that will lead to credit recommendations. The courses will be low-cost or free.

Senior (Citizen) Student Debt Rising (Inside Higher Ed)
More than 700,000 households headed by Americans 65 or older now carry student debt, according to a report released Wednesday by the U.S.

Overall EIU enrollment down 8 percent (Journal Gazette & Times-Courier)
CHARLESTON -- Newly released 10-day figures show an approximately 8 percent drop in enrollment at Eastern Illinois University, according to an EIU press release. Overall enrollment was down 862 students, from 8,726 in fall 2013 to 8,045 students in fall 2014.

LIVE: UI trustees preparing to vote on Salaita (News-Gazette)
University of Illinois trustees have emerged from closed session and are now taking public comment.

Proposed UI financial aid policy changes to receive scrutiny (News-Gazette)
Students who turn down an offer of admission from the University of Illinois increasingly cite money as the primary reason, with four years of tuition alone totaling almost $50,000.

Proposed UI financial aid policy changes to receive scrutiny (News-Gazette)
URBANA — Students who turn down an offer of admission from the University of Illinois increasingly cite money as the primary reason, with four years of tuition alone totaling almost $50,000.

Quincy University campaign seeks to raise $1 million for fifth straight year (Quincy Herald-Whig)
Quincy University launched its annual QU Fund campaign Wednesday by announcing a goal of raising at least $1 million for the fifth straight year.

College Affordability Metrics Don’t Match HBCUs’ Mission (Springfield State Journal-Register)
The current metric used by the Obama administration to measure college affordability does not rely on the critical role that historically Black colleges and universities play in educating traditionally underrepresented students, according to a new report released by the University of Pennsylvania’s Graduate School of Education’s Center for Minority Serving Institutions.

Final U of I decision expected on professor's employment (Springfield State Journal-Register)
Attorneys for a professor who lost an offer to work at the University of Illinois because of anti-Israel Twitter messages expect the school's Board of Trustees to make a final decision on his employment today. Read more: http://www.sj-r.com/article/20140911/News/140919883#ixzz3D1CQCpuN

Durbin supports increased access for veterans to higher education benefits (The Daily Illini)
Some veterans in Illinois who want to attend college are having difficulty accessing their full state and federal benefits in order to pay for their education. But that may soon change.

No need to teach girls differently online (The Hechinger Report)
To hear some ed tech enthusiasts tell it, online learning is sweeping aside the barriers that have in the past prevented access to education. But such pronouncements are premature.

Competency catches on (The Hechinger Report)
Competency-based education isn’t an experiment at Bellevue College near Seattle, writes Paul Bradley on Community College Week. The college’s first CBE program — a business software specialist certificate program — has proven very popular.

Active learning helps first-gen students (The Hechinger Report)
Active learning raised average test scores more than 3 percentage points, and significantly reduced the number of students who failed the exams, the study found. The score increase was doubled, to more than 6 percentage points, for black students and first-generation college students.

A Simple Equation: More Education = More Income (The New York Times)
Imagine if the United States government taxed the nation’s one-percenters so that their post-tax share of the nation’s income remained at 10 percent, roughly where it was in 1979.

California Bill Sets Sights on Curbing Campus Sexual Assaults (The New York Times)
California is poised to become the first state to require all colleges that receive state funds to strengthen their policies on sexual assault by mandating that students give active consent to one another before all sexual activity, either by saying “yes” to a spoken query or by signaling assent in a nonverbal way.

Ebola not an immediate risk on SIU campus (The Southern Illinoisan)
Ebola is not an immediate threat to the SIU campus, an SIU Student Health Services official said.

September 10, 2014

Quote of the day:
“There are two educations. One should teach us how to make a living and the other how to live.”
John Adams

U. of I. Board expected to OK more need-based financial aid (Chicago Sun-Times)
The University of Illinois Board of Trustees is expected to approve more need-based financial aid than it does now by adopting a more flexible funding formula.

Rejected professor Salaita wants U. of I. job or else he'll sue (Chicago Tribune)
CHAMPAIGN — Professor Steven Salaita, whose job offer was rescinded by the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign because of his controversial social media comments about Israel, called on the school Tuesday to give him his position back..

S. Biff Bowman, trustee, DePaul University (Chicago Tribune)
S. Biff Bowman, incoming chief financial officer of Northern Trust, has been elected a trustee at DePaul University. He is a member of the board of directors of the public-private partnership Skills for Chicagoland's Future and Lincoln Park Zoo.

Salaita to U. of Illinois: ‘Reinstate Me’ or Brace for Legal Fight (Chronicle of Higher Education)
Steven G. Salaita wants to continue fighting for a job at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and he’s ready to take legal action if he doesn’t get it.

Are Demographics Destiny? Student Advocates and For-Profit Colleges Disagree (Chronicle of Higher Education)
Student and consumer groups, worried that the Education Department is considering softening its proposed "gainful employment" rule, are challenging a study that suggests that demographics drive student outcomes.

ECC by the numbers: Report shows where college is succeeding, lagging (Courier News)
ELGIN — The student body at Elgin Community College last school year had a bigger percentage of blacks and Hispanics than the overall population of the area it serves. The college also does fantastically well in preparing students to pass state exams for various professional licenses, with 100 percent of students in many professional preparation programs passing the final test.

Counselors Work to Get More Students on College Path (Education Week)
Kristin M. Chiasson and her team of guidance counselors have been ramping up efforts to foster more of a college-going culture at Wayne Memorial High School, near Detroit, where a majority of students would be among the first in their families to pursue higher education.

The 'Murky Middle' (Inside Higher Ed)
Colleges and universities trying to improve retention and graduation rates may be directing academic support services to the wrong students, emerging research suggests.

Tugged in Two Directions (Inside Higher Ed)
A surge in new competency-based degree programs has created challenges for the accreditors tasked with approving them.

Higher spending may not help U.S. higher education outperform peers (PBS NewsHour)
The United States’ spending on higher education far outstrips that of other countries that make up the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development, according to the group’s annual Education at a Glance report released today.

Northwestern, UIUC To Receive More Than $8.4 M For Clean Energy Research (Progress Illinois)
The U.S. Department of Energy is set to collectively give Northwestern University and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign more than $8.4 million for clean energy and research and development.

Professor who lost U of I job offer wants position (St. Louis Post-Dispatch)
A professor who lost a job offer from the University of Illinois over dozens of sometimes-profane Twitter messages that critics deemed anti-Semitic demanded Tuesday that he be given the position and threatened to take legal action otherwise

September 9, 2014

Quote of the day:
“This bridge will take you halfway there — the last few steps you will have to take yourself.”
Shel Silverstein

ISU solar car chosen for international event (Bloomington Pantagraph)
Illinois State University's solar car team will travel to one of the top oil-producing countries in the world to show what its alternative energy vehicle can do

ISU up, IWU down in U.S. News rankings (Bloomington Pantagraph)
Illinois State University moved up several spots in the U.S. News & World Report rankings of “2015 Best Colleges” and Illinois Wesleyan University remained strong despite dropping several notches....

UIC down, ISU up in magazine’s ‘Best Colleges’ rankings (Chicago Sun-Times)
The 2015 edition of U.S. News & World Report’s “Best Colleges” rankings shows the University of Illinois at Chicago the biggest loser and Illinois State University the biggest winner compared to last year’s rankings among schools throughout the region.

Salaita to make first public comments at U. of I. (Chicago Tribune)
Controversial professor Steven Salaita, whose job was revoked weeks before he was to start at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, plans to make his first public comments this afternoon on campus, following an expected classroom walkout by his supporters..

Rise of Online Booksellers Brings Complaints From Campus Bookstores (Chronicle of Higher Education)
When the orange Chegg bus rolls onto a campus, one person is unlikely to be excited about its free swag and energy drinks: the college-bookstore manager.

DeVry schools startups with 1871 education incubator (Crain's Chicago Business)
DeVry Education Group Inc. is teaming up with 1871 on an incubator for education-technology startups. DeVry, already an 1871 sponsor, is launching the EdTech Incubator, expecting to admit up to 10 startups spread over two classes annually.

CLC, NIU strike transfer deal (Daily Herald)
Eligible students who leave College of Lake County before receiving an associate degree won't lose out if they attend Northern Illinois University, under an agreement struck Friday.

Join the club (Herald & Review)
An organization to provide a forum for veterans soon may be joining the list of clubs offered at Richland Community College.

OECD ‘Education at a Glance’ Report Published (Inside Higher Ed)
The Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development has released its annual Education at a Glance report, an almanac of indicators on such topics as educational attainment, employment rates by level of education, funding for educational systems, and student mobility across the 34 OECD member nations as well as for 10 additional countries.

The Long View on Wages (Inside Higher Ed)
A Virginia state agency has released what is likely the first broad look at the mid-career earnings of college graduates, with a newly released report tracking wages at all degree levels for up to two decades after graduation.

Measuring What? (Inside Higher Ed)
The New York Times kicked off its higher education conference here Monday night by releasing what it called a "revolutionary college index" that ranks institutions that enroll students from low-income backgrounds.

Credential Creep Confirmed (Inside Higher Ed)
The broad public policy push for more Americans to get a higher education leans heavily on the idea that those without a college degree are up a creek, because so many jobs in today’s technology and information economy (and more in tomorrow’s) will require a credential.

Lake Land board OKs equipment update (Journal Gazette & Times-Courier)
MATTOON (JG-TC) -- The Lake Land College Board of Trustees on Monday accepted a $92,348 bid for Prairie Fire Sprinkler, of Decatur, to replace the pump and piping for the college's fire loop with hydrants. The dated equipment has fallen into disrepair and parts cannot be found for the existing pump so it must be replaced, says a memo from Director of Facilities Planning Mike Kasdorf.

UI researchers: Community college students uncertain about Affordable Care Act (News-Gazette)
Selling young adults on health insurance has been a key part of making the Affordable Care Act succeed, but many uninsured students at Illinois community colleges were in the dark and confused about the federal health care law and what it has to offer, researchers found.

Purdue Introduces New Competency-Based Degree Program (NPR)
The College of Technology at Purdue University introduced a new program last week that allows students to decide the progress of their education outside of the traditional academic calendar.

UIS enrollment at record level (Springfield State Journal-Register)
Enrollment at the University of Illinois Springfield is at a record high this fall after topping 5,000 students for the fifth consecutive year.

College-rating proposal shines spotlight on powerful lobby (The Hechinger Report)
The annual meeting of the National Association of Independent Colleges and Universities this year had the tone of a revival meeting.

Top Colleges That Enroll Rich, Middle Class and Poor (The New York Times)
Over the last decade, dozens of colleges have proclaimed that recruiting a more economically diverse student body was a top priority. Many of those colleges have not matched their words with actions. But some have.

Editorial: When Yes Means Yes (The New York Times)
The California Legislature recently approved a bill that would require colleges receiving state-financed student aid to change the definition of consent in their sexual assault policies, replacing the traditional “no means no” standard with “affirmative consent,” known colloquially as “yes means yes.”

Sarvela covers SIU's successes and challenges in State of the University address (The Southern Illinoisan)
Interim Chancellor Paul Sarvela delivered his first State of the University address Monday, highlighting some of the school’s successes and its looming challenges.

Interactive science classes benefit black, first-generation college students, study finds (The Washington Post)
A new study about college-level science shows that all students do much better when traditional lecture classes are made interactive — but those most helped are first-generation and black students.

Michelle Obama to students: Challenges arean advantage, not a disadvantage (The Washington Post)
Michelle Obama urged African American teenagers in a tough Atlanta neighborhood to push ahead with their studies and make it to college, whatever hardships they face on the way.

U.S. News college rankings: Amid predictability, some major shifts (The Washington Post)
Princeton University, in New Jersey, is again ranked the No. 1 national university in U.S. News and World Report’s annual list. Top-ranked schools haven’t seen much change in five years, but there are some major movers on the U.S. News lists

September 8, 2014

Quote of the day:
I'd rather be a failure at something I love than a success at something I hate.
George Burns

ISU fans cheer Stoinev's success on 'Talent' (Bloomington Pantagraph)
More than 150 fans at a watch party for Illinois State University graduate Christian Stoinev broke into cheers Wednesday night when they learned he would be advancing to the final 12 in the “America’s Got Talent” competition on NBC.

Extra effort yields freshman enrollment jump (Bloomington Pantagraph)
Extra effort yields freshman enrollment jump

ISU seeks global exchanges (Bloomington Pantagraph)
Illinois State University President Larry Dietz will travel to China next month to sign an exchange agreement with Wuhan University, part of an effort to increase campus diversity and exposure to other cultures.

Dietz 'enjoying the heck' out of being ISU president (Bloomington Pantagraph)
Getting up for early meetings, working all day, then attending evening events doesn't bother Illinois State University President Larry Dietz.

Editorial: U. of I. makes the right call on tweeting professor (Chicago Sun-Times)
The world is afflicted by enough crude and rude discourse, the type that pretends to advance debate but only divides and inflames. The fulminations of talk radio come to mind, and the snarls of trolls on Twitter and news websites — you can’t miss it.

Illinois pension debt rate nation’s worst, Moody's report says (Chicago Sun-Times)
Illinois’ pension liability as a percentage of state revenue is far and away the nation’s highest, according to a new report from a major credit-rating agency

Northern Illinois University, College of Lake County sign reverse transfer agreement (Chicago Tribune)
Innovative agreement allows students to apply NIU credits toward CLC degree. Flanked by students, Northern Illinois University President Doug Baker and College of Lake County President Girard W. Weber signed an innovative reverse transfer agreement during a Sept. 5 ceremony at NIU's Barsema Alumni and Visitor's Center.

Benedictine reports its second-highest undergraduate enrollment (Chicago Tribune)
Lisle, Illinois ~ While other area colleges and universities are consolidating or cutting back in response to market changes impacting their enrollment, Benedictine's traditional undergraduate enrollment continues to increase..

Hartstein, Oakton Community College pioneer, dies (Daily Herald)
Ray Hartstein, founding chairman of the Oakton Community College board and a member for 35 years, died peacefully yesterday at his Vernon Hills home at 96.

California Higher Education Systems Pledge Common-Core Support (Education Week)
The leaders of the four branches of California's public and private higher education establishment have proclaimed their support of the Common Core State Standards and Smarter Balanced tests, saying that they are adjusting admission requirements and teacher-preparation programs to line up with the new expectations.

Random campus queries find none who will 'walk' for Salaita (News-Gazette)
URBANA — Count Jason Park out of Tuesday's "Student Walkout and National Day of Silence" in support of Steven Salaita. "I came halfway around the world, from Jakarta, Indonesia, to attend the University of Illinois.

Editorial: Critics of Wise, Easter off base (News-Gazette)
The campus community should feel free to discuss the Steven Salaita controversy, but no-confidence votes on top administrators are not justified. Accepting the view of their recent critics requires a decidedly low opinion of University of Illinois Chancellor Phyllis Wise and President Robert Easter.

Commentary: LLCC gives tools for avoiding student debt (Springfield State Journal-Register)
At Lincoln Land Community College, students are prepared to meet opportunities without the burden of high student loan debt. Read more: http://www.sj-r.com/article/20140906/News/140909631#ixzz3Cjn8Ogf9

The Invisible Achievement Gap: Students in Foster Care (The Huffington Post)
Across the country it’s back to school time. I hope it is a year full of promise and not disappointment and added stress for all children -- especially those most vulnerable.

Demanding More From College (The New York Times)
I’M beginning to think that college exists mainly so we can debate and deconstruct it.

Editorial: A Fairer Shot for Student Debtors (The New York Times)
This year, the federal government will pay companies that collect student loan payments about $600 million. Too often, those collectors fail to help millions of borrowers manage their accounts. Worse, some actually drive them deeper into debt.

Voice of The Southern: Up is good (The Southern Illinoisan)
Quoting Winston Churchill, Interim Chancellor Paul Sarvela of SIU Carbondale declared a 25-student increase in this fall’s enrollment a ‘v’ for victory. As well he should. Following a nine-year free fall that had seen enrollment declines totaling over 3,500 students, an increase – even a most modest one – is welcome relief.

Freshman and international students increase SIU enrollment (The Southern Illinoisan)
Growing numbers of international students and large freshmen classes are encouraging SIU officials that their efforts to boost enrollment and retention are paying off.

Unique program teaching research practices to undergraduates (The Southern Illinoisan)
CARBONDALE – A new program is providing SIU undergraduate students free research workshops that would cost them thousands of dollars at other universities.

New York Times reportedly entering the college-rating field (The Washington Post)
The Times will soon unveil “a new ranking of colleges and universities based on their ability to attract underprivileged kids,” according to a report last week in The Chronicle of Higher Education.

September 5, 2014

Quote of the day:
“Truth is like the sun. You can shut it out for a time, but it ain’t goin’ away.”
Elvis Presley

Roosevelt president: Suburban students can finish programs in Schaumburg (Chicago Tribune)
Roosevelt University's president said Schaumburg campus students can finish their programs in the suburbs after some spoke out following the school's announcement that it would cut most of its suburban offerings..

Rise of Online Booksellers Brings Complaints From Campus Bookstores (Chronicle of Higher Education)
When the orange Chegg bus rolls onto a campus, one person is unlikely to be excited about its free swag and energy drinks: the college-bookstore manager.

Is a Degree Still Worth It? Yes, Researchers Say, and the Payoff Is Getting Better (Chronicle of Higher Education)
One could be excused for thinking the value of a college degree is in a downward spiral. With overall student-loan debt topping $1-trillion and tuition racing upward, to college graduates facing high levels of underemployment and stagnating wages, it might appear college simply isn’t worth it.

History Jobs Dip for a Second Consecutive Year (Chronicle of Higher Education)
It’s hard out there for a historian.

Hanover Park to pay for 'emergency' roof project at Education and Work Center (Daily Herald)
The new Education and Work Center in Hanover Park suffered damage when heavy rains poured through a leaky roof just hours after a ribbon-cutting that drew educators and politicians.

Scholarship group has great first event (Daily Herald)
Excel Beyond 211 Dollars for Scholars is a newly created not-for-profit benefiting college-ready graduates from District 211 high schools who are low income, and the first generation in their families to attend college.

Role of Technology Growing in Realm of College Advising (Diverse Issues in Higher Education)
A new mobile phone app that nudges students to perform certain tasks that are part of the college admissions process.

Marathon Presidency to End (Inside Higher Ed)
The nation’s longest-serving university president, Norman Francis, said Thursday he will retire next summer after 47 years leading a single institution, Xavier University of Louisiana.

Illinois Chancellor Sees Errors in Process, Not Outcome (Inside Higher Ed)
Phyllis Wise, chancellor of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, is standing by her decision to block the hiring of Steven Salaita -- known for his anti-Israel tweets -- to teach in the American Indian studies program.

Feds Suspect More FAFSA Errors, Will Again Reprocess Forms (Inside Higher Ed)
For the second time this year, the U.S. Department of Education will reprocess tens of thousands of federal student aid applications because of a decimal place error, officials announced Thursday.

Purdue to Create Competency-Based Bachelor's Degree (Inside Higher Ed)
Purdue University on Thursday announced a plan to create a new cross-disciplinary bachelor's degree.

Letters oppose, support Wise on Salaita issue (News-Gazette)
More than 260 professors at the University of Illinois have signed a letter of support for Chancellor Phyllis Wise in response to recent no-confidence votes over the Steven Salaita hiring controversy.

Eureka College senior Sarah Hall worked at Hawaiian palaceas part of Reagan fellowship (Peoria Journal Star)
Most summer trips to Hawaii are filled with beaches and surfing, but a Eureka College student spent her summer at a building that was once the epicenter of the Hawaiian monarchy. Read more: http://www.pjstar.com/article/20140904/News/140909597#ixzz3CSXUsjFC

Our View: Help Bradley be the best it can be (Peoria Journal Star)
From one end of Illinois to the other, schools are facing significant budget challenges, and the state’s universities, public and private alike, are no exception. Read more: http://www.pjstar.com/article/20140904/Opinion/140909524#ixzz3CSYBva9e

States Collaborate to Keep Track of Students (Stateline.org)
States typically lose track of students once they cross state borders. One pilot project aimed to see if some states could successfully share data to shape policy.

They earned a degree and then … (The Hechinger Report)
College students don’t work very hard or learn very much, concluded Richard Arum and Josipa Roksa in their 2011 book, Academically Adrift.

Why Colleges With a Distinct Focus Have a Hidden Advantage (The New York Times)
Take a look at any of the most widely followed ratings of America’s colleges and universities, and almost all of the top-ranked schools will have this in common: They want to appeal to everyone, or at least everyone with a brilliant mind and a work ethic to match.

Adrian Miller elected SIU student trustee (The Southern Illinoisan)
It took five months and two elections, but one of Carbondale's own has officially been elected SIU Board of Trustees student representative

More Parents Use Retirement Accounts to Pay for College (U.S. News & World Report)
Some families dip into their retirement accounts to help pay for college. A Sallie Mae and Ipsos survey of 1,601 college students and parents of undergraduate students found that 7 percent of families took a withdrawal from a retirement account to help cover college costs in 2014, up from 5 percent in 2013.

September 4, 2014

Quote of the day:
“Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world. Indeed,it’s the only thing that ever has.”
Margaret Mead

ISU fans cheer Stoinev's success on 'Talent' (Bloomington Pantagraph)
More than 150 fans at a watch party for Illinois State University graduate Christian Stoinev broke into cheers Wednesday night when they learned he would be advancing to the final 12 in the “America’s Got Talent” competition on NBC.

U. of I. considers boosting financial aid (Chicago Tribune)
niversity of Illinois officials say they may need to boost financial aid because state students are increasingly choosing to go elsewhere for college..

History Jobs Dip for a Second Consecutive Year (Chronicle of Higher Education)
It’s hard out there for a historian. Once again, there were far fewer employment opportunities for history Ph.D.’s last academic year than the number of doctorates earned in the field, according to a report released on Wednesday by the American Historical Association.

How Much Student-Loan Debt Is Too Much? (Chronicle of Higher Education)
The Chronicle asked students, recent graduates, parents, and experts a simple question: What is the most you should borrow for a bachelor's degree?

On the Immense Good Fortune of Higher Education (Chronicle of Higher Education)
Six years ago, I wrote my first Think Tank column. This is the last. Here’s what I’ve learned along the way.

‘The Shoe Could Soon Be on the Other Foot’ for Full-Time Faculty (Chronicle of Higher Education)
Like many other readers who have commented on the “Is That Whining Adjunct Someone We Want Teaching Our Young?” (The Chronicle, August 25), I couldn’t help but be struck by the mistaken assumptions that underlie the argument.

Durbin touts student loan debt refinancing bill at NIU (Dekalb Daily Chronicle)
Aysha Flowers would like to save money to buy a house or a car, but instead her extra money goes toward $64,000 in debt from student loans she took out to pay for her Northern Illinois University education.

Diverse Conversations: Effective Fundraising for Higher Education (Diverse Issues in Higher Education)
In these difficult economic times, fundraising is challenging across the board. In higher education, it is no exception. University presidents and chief advancement officers, those in charge of higher education fundraising, are having to get more and more creative to not only raise awareness about the support needed by higher education institutions but also to get funding in place through effective campaigning.

Big Year Looms for Common-Core Testing (Education Week)
For four years, schools in nearly every state have been working to put the Common Core State Standards into practice in classrooms, but few have put them to the test—literally. This year, that changes.

Gambling on the Lottery (Inside Higher Ed)
A growing number of states are using lottery money for college scholarships. But the politically popular lottery funds often fail to live up to their expectations, according to a new report from the American Association of State Colleges and Universities.

Chancellor says UI must fix 'errors' in hiring process (News-Gazette)
Chancellor Phyllis Wise said Wednesday that the university is moving to correct "errors" in the hiring process that contributed to the uproar over the Steven Salaita case.

'We are the university that achieves its goals' (Quad-City Times)
Western Illinois University's Quad-City Riverfront campus may still be a work in progress, but state and local officials celebrated a major milestone in the expansion of the university Wednesday. “We are the university that thinks big, we are the university that dreams big, and we are the university that achieves its goals,” Western president Jack Thomas said.

Governors State to open renovated science wing (Springfield State Journal-Register)
Governors State University will officially open its renovated science, health sciences and technology wing this week. Read more: http://www.sj-r.com/article/20140904/News/140909774#ixzz3CM1sbZgN

Former President Jimmy Carter to visit Illinois College (Springfield State Journal-Register)
Former President Jimmy Carter will speak at Illinois College next month. Read more: http://www.sj-r.com/article/20140903/News/140909834#ixzz3CM2M6ji5

John A. Logan enrollment dropping slightly (The Southern Illinoisan)
CARTERVILLE -- John A. Logan College is expecting slightly lower enrollments this fall. The community college estimates it will have about 6,200 students -- 200 less than last year's total of 6,400.

It takes half as long to recoup the cost of a college degree today as it did in the 1970s (The Washington Post)
Tuition costs are rising faster than inflation. Many people with college degrees end up unemployed or underemployed. And debt collectors are being criticized for the ways they go after graduates for payments owed.

September 3, 2014

Quote of the day:
“Children need models rather than critics.”
Joseph Joubert

Enrollment up at local universities; down at SWIC (Belleville News-Democrat)
Enrollment is up at the area's four-year universities for the fall semester, but down at the largest community college. Read more here: http://www.bnd.com/2014/09/02/3379170_lindenwood-mckendree-and-siue.html?rh=1#storylink=cpy

Triton College kicks off 50th anniversary with sundial, giant cake (Chicago Sun-Times)
Students, college administrators and politicians gathered in Triton College’s newly-renovated outdoor commons area Thursday to commemorate the school’s 50th anniversary.

Recent college grads face stagnant pay prospects (Chicago Tribune)
As college freshmen begin to lay the groundwork for their futures, the job experiences of many recent college graduates may take some of the thrill and promise out of early days on campus.. More than five years after the recession, a large proportion of recent college graduates is still in jobs that don't require college degrees, and starting salaries for a broad range of occupations are stuck in the doldrums.

Do Americans Expect Too Much From a College Degree? (Chronicle of Higher Education)
In times like these, data points get wielded like cudgels.

Education Dept. Tells Ratings Skeptics Their Concerns Are Valid (Chronicle of Higher Education)
A key Education Department official said on Tuesday that she shared education researchers’ concerns about the potential unintended consequences of a federal college-ratings system.

Colleges Get Advice on Monitoring for Ebola Exposure (Chronicle of Higher Education)
Colleges and universities should identify students and faculty and staff members who have traveled in the past 21 days to four West African countries where Ebola outbreaks are occurring to assess the chances that they may have been exposed to the deadly virus, according to new guidelines from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Will College Ratings Hurt Minority Students? Here's Why Researchers Are Wary (Chronicle of Higher Education)
You’ve probably heard of "food deserts"—those low-income communities with limited access to affordable and nutritious groceries.

Tenure-Track Wisdom, Part 1 (Chronicle of Higher Education)
Here is the first in a series of interviews with faculty who recently finished their first year on the tenure track. - See more at: https://chroniclevitae.com/news/685-tenure-track-wisdom-part-1#sthash.lTewrsQN.dpuf

'A Growing Hunt for Heretics'? (Chronicle of Higher Education)
Steven G. Salaita was to begin his job as a tenured professor in American Indian studies at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign in mid-August.

Your Dissertation Is Done. Move On. (Chronicle of Higher Education)
I'm convinced that it’s not a good idea to advise newly minted scholars to revise their dissertations into first books.

Let's Ask More of Our Students—and of Ourselves (Chronicle of Higher Education)
College graduates in general do much better economically than those who do not complete college, which is not particularly surprising given both the level of economic inequality in our society and the role of higher education in sorting, selecting, and signaling differences in prior academic ability.

Proposed College Rating System Penalizes Minority-Serving Institutions (Diverse Issues in Higher Education)
In order for the Obama administration’s proposed college ratings system to be fair, the system must take into account the differences in institutional resources and variations in the overall characteristics of different student bodies.

Report Recommends Educational Policy Adjustments to Aid Minority Males (Diverse Issues in Higher Education)
In an effort to improve the educational outcomes for boys and young men of color, a group of well-known education professors released a report yesterday, outlining a series of state and federal policy recommendations aimed at addressing the issue.

College Education Worth the Investment (Diverse Issues in Higher Education)
There is no greater financial investment in one’s future than a college degree.

The Real Hero in Movie ‘Boyhood’ is Education (Diverse Issues in Higher Education)
This Labor Day I saw the only real must-see movie for educators, or really anyone with a pulse willing to examine their lives. It’s the simple but very complex Richard Linklater film, “Boyhood.”

U.S. Approval for Wisconsin Competency-Based Program (Inside Higher Ed)
The U.S. Department of Education last week granted approval to a self-paced, competency-based program from two institutions in the University of Wisconsin System, the system announced Tuesday

Blaming the Victims? (Inside Higher Ed)
WASHINGTON -- Since President Obama announced his college ratings plan more than a year ago, many higher education groups here have mounted the political equivalent of a full-court press against the proposal

SIU enrollment increases following 9-year decline (News-Gazette)
A streak of school years with declining enrollment has ended at Southern Illinois University.

Kennedy reaffirms Wise's decision (News-Gazette)
URBANA — In response to recent rumblings about a change in strategy regarding Steven Salaita, University of Illinois Board of Trustee Chairman Christopher Kennedy on Tuesday reaffirmed his support of the chancellor's decision to not forward the controversial professor's appointment to the board for approval.

SIU enrollment increases following 9-year decline (St. Louis Post-Dispatch)
A streak of school years with declining enrollment has ended at Southern Illinois University.

4,000 apply at ASU for Starbucks plan (The Arizona Republic)
Arizona State University President Michael Crow told faculty this week that "just under" 4,000 Starbucks employees have applied to begin an online program aimed at getting them to finish their college degrees.

Community college district tries full slate of innovations, all at once (The Hechinger Report)
Hidden at the edge of an industrial park near the Phoenix airport, housed in a handful of utilitarian buildings with no grassy quadrangles or ivy crawling up red brick, Rio Salado Community College doesn’t look much like a typical higher-education institution.

The Economic Price of Colleges’ Failures (The New York Times)
Four years ago, the sociologists Richard Arum and Josipa Roksa dropped a bomb on American higher education.

Disruptions in the Lecture Hall (The New York Times)
The New York Times fourth annual Schools for Tomorrow Conference will be devoted to how innovations and challenges — social, economic, political and technological — are calling into question the very nature of higher education.

Active Role in Class Helps Black and First-Generation College Students, Study Says (The New York Times)
The trend away from classes based on reading and listening passively to lectures, and toward a more active role for students, has its most profound effects on black students and those whose parents did not go to college, a new study of college students shows.

U.S. Health Agency Advises More Vigilance on Campuses (The New York Times)
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has advised American colleges and universities, and any students or staff arriving from nations hit by the Ebola virus, to take precautions against spreading the disease that go beyond what most schools have done.

On Sidelines, Researchers See C.E.O.s (The New York Times)
In late 2012, Arkansas hired Bret Bielema as its football coach, paying him a salary of $3.2 million a year, plus bonuses, making him one of the best-compensated coaches in his industry and his state’s highest-paid employee.

The Economic Price of Colleges’ Failures (The New York Times)
Four years ago, the sociologists Richard Arum and Josipa Roksa dropped a bomb on American higher education. Their groundbreaking book, “Academically Adrift,” found that many students experience “limited or no learning” in college.

SIU enrollment increases for first time in 10 years (The Southern Illinoisan)
SIU's nine-year streak of declining enrollments has been broken.

Some community colleges report slightly lower enrollments (The Southern Illinoisan)
Rend Lake College and Southeastern Illinois College are reporting flat or slightly lower enrollments.

Stanford University plans to slowly increase its undergraduate enrollment (The Washington Post)
The most selective university in the country plans to open its gates a bit wider in the next few years.

September 2, 2014

Quote of the day:
“If people did not do silly things, nothing intelligent would ever get done.”
Ludwig Wittgenstein

U.S. Is Urged to Curtail Alarming Dropout Rates Among Minority Men (Chronicle of Higher Education)
The federal government should require all colleges to create early-alert systems that flag students with low test scores, missing assignments, or spotty attendance.

SIU hoping enrollment doesn't fall again this year (Daily Herald)
Officials at Southern Illinois University say they're "guardedly optimistic" new figures will show an end to a trend of dropping enrollments.

Roosevelt move part of 'tectonic shift' in education (Daily Herald)
The market forces prompting Roosevelt University to significantly scale back its Schaumburg operation are the result of a "tectonic shift" in higher education in Illinois that is being felt by colleges throughout the state, experts say.

'Aspiring Adults Adrift' (Inside Higher Ed)
In their 2011 book Academically Adrift, authors Richard Arum and Josipa Roksa, argued that colleges are failing to educate students.

Higher Ed Groups Respond to Harkin’s Draft Proposal (Inside Higher Ed)
Dozens of higher education interest groups submitted comments last week on Senator Tom Harkin’s draft proposal to reauthorize the Higher Education Act.

U. of Illinois Willing to Settle With Salaita (Inside Higher Ed)
The University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign is willing to make a financial settlement with Steven Salaita, the controversial scholar whose hiring was blocked last month by Chancellor Phyllis Wise amid debate over Salaita's anti-Israel comments.

Cutting Costs and Quality? (Inside Higher Ed)
An institution’s decision to drop print books for ebooks may rankle traditionalists, but at the University Colorado at Boulder, it’s the open-to-innovation crowd that is speaking out.

Salaita backlash putting UI in bad light (News-Gazette)
Wanted: world-class scholar for state flagship university: home to Nobel Prize winners, patent-generating professors, an international student body and a fiery contretemps that has included academic boycotts and votes of no confidence in university leaders.

Salaita prompted donors' fury (News-Gazette)
As news spread in late July about a new University of Illinois faculty hire and media outlets began publishing some of his profanity-laden tweets, a number of wealthy donors threatened to stop giving money to the university, recently released documents show.

Can universities be embarrassed into raising graduation rates? (PBS NewsHour)
It was the last day of student government elections at Purdue University, and junior Bobby Hadrix, running for class president, was doing some 11th-hour stumping on the campus oval alongside fervent supporters in bright red matching T-shirts.

As student bodies get more diverse, colleges rethink services (PBS NewsHour)
This year, for the first time, white students make up less than half the student body in the country’s public K-12 schools, down from 63 percent in 1997. That same change is coming to college campuses fast.

SXU installs high-tech video wall (Southtown Star)
St. Xavier University’s Center for Instructional Design and Academic Technology recently completed its video wall, a high-tech electronic display for showcasing student artwork

LLCC schedules health career information sessions (Springfield State Journal-Register)
Lincoln Land Community College will hold a series of information sessions on health-care careers starting in November and continuing into May 2015.

No smoking ban applies to Illini tailgaters too (St. Louis Post-Dispatch)
The University of Illinois is reminding football fans that its new smoke-free campus policy applies to tailgaters in Memorial Stadium parking lots.

Op-ed: Value of college degree is still strong (The Indianapolis Star)
There is no greater financial investment in one’s future than a college degree. While this viewpoint has its critics, the reality is the value of a degree has never been greater.

Picking Up an Elusive College Dream (The New York Times)
At the corner of Seventh Avenue and 27th Street, Tenille Warren waited impatiently for the light to change.

SIU hopeful retention plan is working (The Southern Illinoisan)
CARBONDALE -- SIU officials are anxiously awaiting 10-day enrollment figures and are “guardedly optimistic” the numbers will show the school has ended its nine-year trend of dropping enrollments.

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