Skip to Content
Illinois Board of Higher Education
Home

Officer Infomation & Search

Media Center > Daily Higher Education News Digest

March 26, 2015

Quote of the day:
"Change is the law of life. And those who look only to the past or present are certain to miss the future."
John F. Kennedy

Students march against racism, sexual violence (Bloomington Pantagraph)
Walking behind a banner that said “Not on my campus,” about 1,000 Illinois State University students — mostly fraternity and sorority members — marched Wednesday evening against racism, discrimination and sexual violence.

Student-Loan Default Rates Are Easily Gamed. Here's a Better Measure. (Chronicle of Higher Education)
The University of the Rockies has a good federal student-loan default rate. Only 7 percent of borrowers from the for-profit graduate school default on their loans within three years of leaving the university — a better record than its peer institutions.

Tenure Lawsuit Challenges Privacy of Student Evaluations (Chronicle of Higher Education)
Should the confidentiality shrouding students’ evaluations of college instructors always be protected, even if it might conceal violations of the law?

Suburban winners, losers under new school funding proposal (Daily Herald)
Suburban school districts would be among the biggest losers and biggest winners under a proposed school funding plan a downstate senator is pushing.

U.S. Keeps Scrutiny of Risky Colleges Secret (Inside Higher Ed)
The U.S. Department of Education is so concerned about the risk that dozens of colleges pose to students and taxpayers that it has curtailed access to federal money at those institutions -- but it won’t say which ones.

Who Gets to Be a .Doctor? (Inside Higher Ed)
Should a doctor of philosophy be considered a .doctor?

On Grading, Assessment and Learning (Inside Higher Ed)
“We’re not paid to teach; we’re paid to grade!”

Bill would ban state funds for commencement speakers (News-Gazette)
Public universities would be prohibited from using public funds to pay for commencement speakers under legislation approved by the House Higher Education Committee on Wednesday.

Illinois Senate on spot to find votes to close budget gap for current year (Springfield State Journal-Register)
Illinois senators are expected to vote Thursday on whether to approve a plan to plug a $1.6 billion vote in the current state budget.

Area students refusing to take new standardized PARCC exam (Springfield State Journal-Register)
The Rochester and the Williamsville-Sherman school districts both reported large numbers of high school students declining to take the controversial PARCC exam this month.

How much should you pay for a degree? (The Hechinger Report)
Does it pay to go to college?

Debunked: $1 trillion in student debt and other myths about the liberal arts (The Hechinger Report)
At a time when critics question the value of a college education, a degree in the liberal arts is under more scrutiny than ever before.

Tools that use student data show promise, but concerns about student privacy remain hotly debated (The Hechinger Report)
On Monday, two Representatives, one a Democrat, the other a Republican, were putting final touches on a proposed new Student Digital Privacy and Parental Rights Act, thus joining the White House in efforts to update federal data privacy law.

March 25, 2015

Quote of the day:
"You don't have to win every argument. Agree to disagree."
Regina Brett

ISU group, NAACP to host police dialogue (Bloomington Pantagraph)
ISU’s My Brotha’s Keeper and NAACP will host "411 on the Five-O," an open panel and interaction with local police chiefs, on Thursday.

Taking a break: Local college students give back (Bloomington Pantagraph)
While other students were lounging on a beach in Florida, Julia Savich of Illinois Wesleyan University was crawling under a trailer in rural Kentucky, hoping any snakes had been chased away.

Fiscal reform, oversight become focus of College of DuPage race (Chicago Tribune)
After months of strife at the College of DuPage, the race for its board of trustees has become a fierce battleground.. Twelve candidates are vying for three six-year terms on the board, with many of the hopefuls citing continuous reports of financial blunders at the state's largest community college as their motivation to seek a board position.

What Colleges Can Do to Improve Career Development (Chronicle of Higher Education)
Families and policy makers have made it clear that they expect colleges to do more to prepare students for careers — and colleges are feeling the pressure.

States Are Eager to Collect Graduates’ Job Data. Here’s Where That Effort Stands. (Chronicle of Higher Education)
For decades some state lawmakers have pushed public colleges and universities to think of themselves as parts of a broader job-training plan.

One Way to Reduce Textbook Costs: Get Rid of Commissions (Chronicle of Higher Education)
As concerns about the sticker price of college grow, one community-college system is taking a step that will reduce the cost of textbooks for its students by forgoing its cut of the revenue for course materials sold through its bookstores.

2 Proposals for Accreditation, 2 Shared Goals: Limits and Flexibility (Chronicle of Higher Education)
Should the role of accreditors be limited?

How an Elite Women’s College Lost Its Base and Found Its Mission (Chronicle of Higher Education)
Almost 30 years ago, Trinity College, in Washington, D.C., faced a crisis familiar to many small institutions today: It lost the ability to attract the predominantly well-to-do women it had traditionally enrolled.

Roosevelt University set to name outsider as next president (Crain's Chicago Business)
Roosevelt University has chosen its next president, a business dean at Kansas State University, and is expected to introduce Ali Malekzadeh on tomorrow, according to a source close to Roosevelt's search committee. Malekzadeh is described by his current employer as an accomplished fundraiser, a trait Roosevelt needs after dealing with red ink, declining enrollment and overexpansion.

Sweet Briar Alumnae Take Steps to Save the College (Diverse Issues in Higher Education)
Dr. Claudia Chang, a professor of anthropology and archeology who has taught at Sweet Briar College in Virginia since 1981, said she and other faculty thought they were going to a community meeting to find out the results of a consultant’s report that would be used to change institutional direction.

Emerging Scholars: Class of 2015 (Diverse Issues in Higher Education)
Each year, it is an extremely tough task for our editorial team to select only 12 scholars — this year was no exception.

Ritter and Prince are choices for Richland Community College Board (Herald & Review)
Please vote for Tom Ritter and Randy Prince for Richland Community trustee on April 7.

No Expectation of Privacy (Inside Higher Ed)
The Obama administration briefly considered but ultimately decided against expanding a new student privacy bill beyond K-12 education, according to sources with knowledge of the drafting process.

A Plan to Privatize Public Universities in Illinois (Inside Higher Ed)
Advocates for public higher education sometimes describe various state plans as efforts to de facto privatize colleges and universities.

House passes two budget fixes to Senate (News-Gazette)
Two bills aimed at mending a $1.6 billion shortfall in the current year's budget were approved in the Illinois House and are on their way to the Senate.

UI to debut new tailgaiting lot, working with donors on changes (News-Gazette)
A University of Illinois athletic official said the reaction from university donors on new plans for a tailgating lot immediately west of Memorial Stadium has been mostly positive.

UI shares in $3 million STEM grant (News-Gazette)
The University of Illinois has received a grant to help improve minority representation in science, technology, engineering and math.

MacMurray College events aim to bring deaf, hearing communities together (Springfield State Journal-Register)
A big part of putting together Deaf Awareness Week at MacMurray College was dispelling some notions about the deaf community, said a student coordinator of the event.

U of I to set up center for minority PhD students (Springfield State Journal-Register)
The University of Illinois plans to use its share of a $3 million grant to set up a center to help minority doctoral students.

Illinois House passes plan to fill state's $1.6 billion budget hole (Springfield State Journal-Register)
The Illinois House Tuesday approved a plan sponsored by Speaker Michael Madigan to fill a $1.6 billion hole in the current state budget, including across-the-board cuts to most state programs.

Hillary Clinton Caught Between Dueling Forces on Education: Teachers and Wealthy Donors (The New York Times)
The last time she ran for president, Hillary Rodham Clinton did not have to take a position on the Common Core, Race to the Top or teacher evaluations in tenure decisions.

SIU debate team wins national title, again (The Southern Illinoisan)
SIU’s top-ranked debate team capped off a record-breaking year on Sunday with a national championship win at the National Parliamentary Tournament of Excellence in Liberty, Missouri.

March 24, 2015

Quote of the day:
"Never look backwards or you'll fall down the stairs."
Rudyard Kipling

Cruz kicks off presidential campaign at Christian college (Bloomington Pantagraph)
Sen. Ted Cruz opened the first major campaign of the 2016 presidential season Monday with a kickoff speech courting cultural conservatives and declaring that he will devote himself to "reigniting the promise of America."

Harper College adopts new mission statement (Chicago Tribune)
Harper College has adopted a new mission statement that will help determine future initiatives and serve as a guide to leaders developing the next five-year strategic plan. The Board of Trustees' recent unanimous vote followed a yearlong development process that included input from more than 1,000 people..

Online or In-Person? One College Lets Students Switch Back and Forth (Chronicle of Higher Education)
When you register for a course, you often have a choice: in-person or online. But at Peirce College, you don’t have to pick one or the other. All students will soon get access to both formats in the same course.

Before Cutting Tuition, Consider This (Chronicle of Higher Education)
If you lead an expensive but not elite private college, there’s a good chance you’ve gotten the question. Is it time to cut tuition?

How One Small College Attracted Its Largest Incoming Class Ever (Chronicle of Higher Education)
Last month’s announcement that Sweet Briar College will close sounded the alarm at many small liberal-arts colleges nationwide.

Endorsement: Our choices for the College of DuPage board (Daily Herald)
Of all the elections taking place in the suburbs this spring, the campaigns for three seats on the board of the College of DuPage have become the most electric, generating interest far beyond the district's boundaries.

It's time to discuss race relations on campuses (Edwardsville Intelligencer)
During the first week of March a nine-second video recorded a few days earlier went viral on the Internet and then throughout all conventional media. The video showed members of the Sigma Alpha Epsilon (SAE) chapter of the University of Oklahoma singing a song that included the N-word and made reference to lynching.

SWIC to host senior art competition exhibition (Edwardsville Intelligencer)
Talented artists from all across the Metro East will showcase their artwork in Life Experienced – A Senior Art Competition.

Common Core tests will widen achievement gap — at first (Edwardsville Intelligencer)
In the minutes between class periods, Revere High School’s halls flood with students.

Millikin gives back to community by teaching (Herald & Review)
Lydia Worsham, a 6-year-old kindergartener at St. Patrick School, was so excited about learning basketball skills from the Millikin University men's coaches and players Saturday that she went to a park afterward to continue practicing.

Alexander’s Higher Ed Act Agenda (Inside Higher Ed)
WASHINGTON -- The leading Republican in the Senate who is working on a rewrite of the Higher Education Act is weighing new ways to hold colleges accountable for their students’ success and is considering a federal database to keep track of student outcomes.

The Two Cultures, 2.0 (Inside Higher Ed)
Half a century ago, C. P. Snow’s The Two Cultures pointed to a growing gap between the sciences and the humanities.

Alexander’s Higher Ed Act Agenda (Inside Higher Ed)
The leading Republican in the Senate who is working on a rewrite of the Higher Education Act is weighing new ways to hold colleges accountable for their students’ success and is considering a federal database to keep track of student outcomes.

Compilation of Articles on Private College Enrollments (Inside Higher Ed)
Inside Higher Ed is pleased to release today "Private College Enrollments: Needs, Numbers, Solutions," our latest compilation of articles.

Brady: University privatization bill not ready for hearing (News-Gazette)
A former Republican candidate for governor has proposed turning Illinois' nine public universities into private, not-for-profit universities, and using the state appropriations they now get to make tuition grants to eligible Illinois students.

Illinois Central College increasing tuition $10 per credit hour (Peoria Journal Star)
For the second year in a row, students at Illinois Central College will see a $10 per credit hour hike in tuition, but budget cuts there still are looming.

Obama announces $240M in new pledges for STEM education (Peoria Journal Star)
President Barack Obama is highlighting private-sector efforts to encourage more students from underrepresented groups to pursue education in science, technology, engineering and math.

Augustana forms yearlong partnership with Clinton, Iowa (Quad-City Times)
In an effort to boost student involvement in the Quad-City area, Augustana College in Rock Island announced Monday a new partnership with the city of Clinton.

SIU furlough repayment grows as budget concerns take center stage (The Southern Illinoisan)
SIU’s Board of Trustees on Thursday authorized repaying $4 million to about 3,500 current and former employees who were forced to take four unpaid furlough days in 2011.

March 23, 2015

Quote of the day:
“A taste for truth at any cost is a passion which spares nothing.”
Albert Camus

Opinion: New State Board of Education leader deserves a chance (Beacon News)
Gov. Bruce Rauner is on a roll. He has tapped James Meeks, former Illinois Democratic state senator, and pastor of the 8,000-member Salem Baptist Church, to lead the Illinois State Board of Education..

Wehrli Says C.O.D. Board Members are Hiding from the Issues by Hiring Chicago PR Firm (Chicago Tribune)
Naperville, IL….Statement from State Representative Grant Wehrli (R-Naperville) regarding the recent decision by the College of DuPage to hire a media relations firm to repair the college's public image. .

Before Cutting Tuition, Consider This (Chronicle of Higher Education)
If you lead an expensive but not elite private college, there’s a good chance you’ve gotten the question.

Scenes From the Death of a College (Chronicle of Higher Education)
Alumnae like to describe Sweet Briar College as a magical place.

Northwestern, Evanston find 5 million reasons to get along (Crain's Chicago Business)
In what appears to be the biggest peace offering to date in a long-running town-gown feud, Northwestern University will give $5 million over a five-year period to the city of Evanston.

ECC students spend spring break helping build home (Daily Herald)
Eleven Elgin Community College students will help Habitat for Humanity of Northern Fox Valley remodel a historic Elgin home this week for an immigrant couple from Uganda.

Endorsement: Our choices for the College of DuPage board (Daily Herald)
Of all the elections taking place in the suburbs this spring, the campaigns for three seats on the board of the College of DuPage have become the most electric, generating interest far beyond the district's boundaries.

Reporter Carl Bernstein to lecture at Bradley in April (Herald & Review)
Investigative reporter and author Carl Bernstein is scheduled next month to deliver a lecture on seeking the truth at Bradley University in Peoria.

The End of College? (Inside Higher Ed)
A growing number of books about higher education's ills have hit the market in recent years.

American Ignorance (Inside Higher Ed)
Among all the seemingly intractable crises Americans face in the world today, none is so serious as their utter unfamiliarity with that world.

The Shifting Landscape in Management Education (Inside Higher Ed)
I’ve worked in management education for over fifteen years and continue to do so because I believe that developing management talent is important, the need is universal and growing, and that how we develop talent will continue to evolve.

College of DuPage board OKs hiring PR firm for $250 per hour (Naperville Sun)
The College of DuPage's decision to hire a public relations company prompted outrage Thursday as college trustees voted 6-1 in favor of a $250 per hour contract with a Chicago-based firm for communications counsel, media relations and messaging strategy..

Mays confirmed as Illinois department director (Quincy Herald-Whig)
The Illinois Senate unanimously confirmed Jeff Mays as director of the Illinois Department of Employment Security on Thursday.

March 20, 2015

Quote of the day:
“If we could sell our experiences for what they cost us we’d be millionaires.”
Abigail Van Buren

Loyola University president stepping down (Chicago Tribune)
After 14 years, the Rev. Michael Garanzini is stepping down as president of Loyola University.. L Related Roosevelt University president's pay ranks No. 5 nationallyNewsRoosevelt University president's pay ranks No. 5 nationallySee all relatedí 8 "It's really been a privilege and a great honor," Garanzini said in a statement.

College of DuPage trustees to investigate alcohol expenses (Chicago Tribune)
Trustees at the College of DuPage plan to investigate thousands of dollars in bills from embattled school President Robert Breuder and senior administrators for alcohol at a tony campus restaurant to determine whether they broke school policy, a sign of growing tension between the board and Breuder..

Chicago State president is accused of pushing fake claims of sex harassment (Chicago Tribune)
The president of Chicago State University tried to pressure a high-level administrator to file false claims of sexual harassment against an outspoken professor to help the college try to silence him, according to court documents filed Thursday as part of an ongoing lawsuit..

Texas Senate set to pass 'campus carry' bill: How common are guns on campus? (Christian Science Monitor)
Texas may soon allow people to carry concealed weapons on college campuses, thanks to a new bill that was given preliminary approval by the state Senate on Wednesday.

Pushing for Culture Change, Ph.D.’s Explore Careers Beyond Academe (Chronicle of Higher Education)
When Sydney Glassman started her Ph.D. in ecology at the University of California here, she was sure she wanted to be a professor.

Sensing a Moment, Diversity Officers Swap Tips on Improving Campus Climate (Chronicle of Higher Education)
Put 300 campus diversity officers in a room, and they’ll have no shortage of topics to discuss.

House Would Cut Student Aid More Than Budget Blueprint Reveals (Chronicle of Higher Education)
Turns out the budget outlook for student aid is even bleaker than it seemed.

Students’ Requests for Their Admissions Records Prompt Colleges to Purge Documents (Chronicle of Higher Education)
Yale University has acknowledged that its law school responded to a wave of student requests for their application evaluations by discarding all such records — an action that has prompted an advocacy group to warn colleges not to destroy potential evidence in admissions lawsuits.

College of DuPage board signs off on deal with PR firm (Daily Herald)
A Chicago-based public relations firm has been working this month to help the College of DuPage board respond to controversies at the Glen Ellyn campus.

'Hunting Ground' a searing look at college rape culture (Daily Herald)
rage against an American college campus rape culture that appears to be flourishing, rage against the institutions that place profits and reputation above justice, rage against the soulless shills who protect those institutions and rage against a system that assassinates truth and "protects" sexual assault victims -- our friends, our daughters, our sons, our sisters and our brothers

SIUE I-Corps team receives recognition (Edwardsville Intelligencer)
Southern Illinois University Edwardsville’s National Science Foundation (NSF) “I-Corps for Learning” team received the Top Team Recognition Award in late February at the final meeting of the 24 teams in California.

Higher education hearing ignites partisan finger-pointing (Inside Higher Ed)
A hearing on funding for state universities descended into partisan finger-pointing Thursday when Democrats suggested one way to avoid deep cuts is to raise taxes.

Reflections on Advising Graduate Students (Inside Higher Ed)
I have some vivid memories of advising graduate students in my early days as a university faculty member.

Motivation to Learn (Inside Higher Ed)
The first time I tried to learn French, my mother signed me up for a high school correspondence course.

The Shifting Landscape in Management Education (Inside Higher Ed)
I’ve worked in management education for over fifteen years and continue to do so because I believe that developing management talent is important, the need is universal and growing, and that how we develop talent will continue to evolve.

Opinion: The Wrong Test (Inside Higher Ed)
Inspired by all of the discussion and controversy over the new PARCC standardized tests for students and as a researcher of people's technology uses, I recently took part of the computerized PARCC fourth-grade math practice test. Even after going through the tutorial explaining the interface, I found myself occasionally as preoccupied with the system as I was with figuring out the math problems.

WIU provost selected as president at Pennsylvania university (McDonough County, The Voice)
Western Illinois University Provost Ken Hawkinson was named to be the 12th president of Kutztown University on Tuesday, assuming the position July 1.

UI officials: Tuition off table for now, but plenty of cuts are possible (News-Gazette)
A tuition increase is off the table this year but just about everything else is on it at the University of Illinois if big budget cuts are enacted, top UI officials told lawmakers Thursday.

UI names commencement speaker (News-Gazette)
Five things to know about Robert Wood Johnson Foundation President/CEO Risa Lavizzo-Mourey, who, we learned Thursday, will deliver the University of Illinois commencement speech on May 16 at Memorial Stadium:

Baker to Legislature: Rauner's $29M cut toNIU would mean staff reductions, financial aid cuts, hikes (North Star Writers Group)
NIU President Doug Baker said Gov. Bruce Rauner’s 31 percent proposed budget cut to NIU could result in a reduction of 375 faculty and staff members.

With Illinois universities facing big cuts, Democrats call for more taxes (Quad-City Times)
A hearing on funding for state universities descended into partisan finger-pointing Thursday when Democrats suggested one way to avoid deep cuts is to raise taxes.

U of I Extension launches emerald ash borer website (Springfield State Journal-Register)
University of Illinois Extension has launched a website to help homeowners manage the emerald ash borer crisis that could be spreading to their yards.

Ex-charter school exec getting $250K as Rauner's education advisor (Springfield State Journal-Register)
A former Chicago charter schools executive is earning $250,000 a year to spearhead Gov. Bruce Rauner's top education initiatives, a salary that is more than double what her predecessors received and places her as the highest-paid member of a Cabinet already under scrutiny for its lofty paychecks.

Turning to Education for Fun (The New York Times)
In a 2013 episode of “60 Minutes,” Charlie Rose visits Bill Gates’s office to get a sense of where the billionaire philanthropist draws intellectual inspiration.

Managing Student Loan Debt as an Older Adult (The New York Times)
Continuing your education is a lofty pursuit, but it could become an albatross if you get too deep into student loan debt.

Luring Working Executives to M.B.A. Programs (The New York Times)
The Conshohocken Curve, a bend in Interstate 76 west of Philadelphia, is one of those traffic-report designations with a plethora of nightmare rush-hour delays.

SIU furlough repayment grows as budget concerns take center stage (The Southern Illinoisan)
SIU’s Board of Trustees on Thursday authorized repaying $4 million to about 3,500 current and former employees who were forced to take four unpaid furlough days in 2011.

Bible Colleges Shouldn’t Need a State Seal (The Wall Street Journal)
President Obama last week directed federal agencies to change the way graduates pay back student loans, the latest in a string of measures that aim to make college more accessible and affordable. Governors across the country have echoed the president’s claims that it is time to get college costs under control. Here’s one idea that wouldn’t cost taxpayers a nickel: Stop overregulating Bible colleges.

March 19, 2015

Quote of the day:
I can accept failure, everyone fails at something. But I can't accept not trying.
Michael Jordan

Community colleges turn to high schools to keep students out of remedial math (Chicago Tribune)
Nicholas Liacone wasn't the greatest math student at Huntley High School. He was good enough to get through basic classes, but not good enough to think he could pass a community college placement test..

House Would Cut Student Aid More Than Budget Blueprint Reveals (Chronicle of Higher Education)
Turns out the budget outlook for student aid is even bleaker than it seemed.

The Student-Loan Crusader Who Won't Stop Fighting (Chronicle of Higher Education)
Alan Collinge is on a mission. It’s a mission that has left him demoralized and destitute, yet more determined than ever.

U.A.E. Incident Raises Questions for Colleges That Open Campuses in Restrictive Countries (Chronicle of Higher Education)
A New York University professor stopped on his way to conduct research in the United Arab Emirates said he wasn’t completely surprised when he learned, while trying to board a plane at Kennedy International Airport this week, that he’d been barred from entering the country.

Sensing a Moment, Diversity Officers Swap Tips on Improving Campus Climate (Chronicle of Higher Education)
Put 300 campus diversity officers in a room, and they’ll have no shortage of topics to discuss.

Aspen Prize Honors Colleges That Are Helping Students Succeed (Chronicle of Higher Education)
A Florida community college that has been more successful than most four-year institutions in propelling students toward bachelor’s degrees took top honors on Wednesday as the Aspen Institute announced its biennial prize for community-college excellence.

Greetings From Wisconsin, Where Higher Ed Is a Love-Hate Affair (Chronicle of Higher Education)
Dear Readers, I’m writing this from the SweetSpot, where people come for coffee, muffins, and conversation. Many regulars are lifelong residents of the city (pop. 15,000).

Santa Fe College Named Nation’s Top Community College (Diverse Issues in Higher Education)
Santa Fe College (SFC) in Gainesville, Florida, is the winner of the 2015 Aspen Prize for Community College Excellence.

How Do We Get More Black Men in College? (Diverse Issues in Higher Education)
College attendance is at a record high. More people are enrolling in college-level courses, both on campuses and through online learning, than at any other point in American history.

Rapid Rise in Chicago (Inside Higher Ed)
WASHINGTON -- Five years ago, Kennedy-King College of Chicago had a relatively low graduation and transfer rate of 34 percent. But since then the college increased that rate by 50 percent, with more than half of students completing in 2011.

Commentary: “A Known Issue” (Inside Higher Ed)
For the last couple of weeks, the home printer/scanner simply refused to communicate with the laptop. I’ve been trying to deal with some travel receipts, and it has been a real headache.

Editorial: Ready, get set, go (News-Gazette)
When it comes to the university's grand plans to offer a revolutionary medical education, success has many fathers. If all goes as planned, the first class of 25 medical students will enroll at the University of Illinois' engineering-based medical school in fall 2017.

NIU aims to expand entrepreneurship with Rockford EIGERlab acquisition (Rockford Register Star)
ROCKFORD — Northern Illinois University has acquired the Rockford-based business incubator EIGERlab as it aims to expand its offerings to budding entrepreneurs and foster economic growth in the region. EIGERlab, 605 Fulton Ave., helps start-ups and existing businesses develop products, commercialize ideas and learn new skills. It also offers design engineering and rapid prototyping services.

Report touts positive impact of community colleges (Southtown Star)
Illinois' 48 community colleges are a financial boon for their regions and the state and provide multiple other benefits as well, according to a recent report by the Center for Governmental Studies at Northern Illinois University..

Rauner says budget fix close; lawmakers oppose schools cut (Springfield State Journal-Register)
Gov. Bruce Rauner said Wednesday that he again believes lawmakers are getting close to a plan to fix holes in the current state budget, but he sidestepped questions about whether that could include cuts to education.

Bill advances to end 50 percenttuition waivers for children ofuniversity workers (Springfield State Journal-Register)
Half-price tuition for children of university employees could be a thing of the past under a bill an Illinois House committee approved Wednesday.

SIU board kicks off budget talks (The Southern Illinoisan)
Budget and tuition topped the SIU Board of Trustees executive committee agenda Wednesday at the Stone Center in Carbondale.

Miller: Students deserve voting power on SIU board (The Southern Illinoisan)
SIU’s Board of Trustees will meet for the first time this year on Wednesday and Thursday.

President Obama Announces More Key Administration Posts (University Press Releases)
Today, President Barack Obama announced his intent to nominate the following individuals to key Administration posts:

March 18, 2015

Quote of the day:
“I am always ready to learn, but I do not always like being taught.”
Winston Churchill

Lawmakers balking at education cuts (Bloomington Pantagraph)
SPRINGFIELD — Lawmakers are balking at a possible fix for the state's ailing budget because it would cut spending to Illinois school districts.

ACE Preparing Female Minorities for Higher Ed Presidencies (Diverse Issues in Higher Education)
Dr. Joanne Berger-Sweeney had been dean of the College of Arts and Sciences at Tufts University for nearly four years when she considered entering a new program that grooms female and minority administrators for college and university presidencies. Dr. Joanne Berger-Sweeney is president of Trinity College in Hartford, Connecticut.

Richland approves tuition increase to offset state losses (Herald & Review)
DECATUR – Pressed by shrinking state appropriations among other economic factors, the Richland Board of Trustees approved a tuition rate increase Tuesday that will go into effect in the summer. The tuition rate for fiscal year 2016 will increase by $8, from $106 to $114 per credit hour.

Editorial: Rising tuition costs the real problem (Herald & Review)
There is legislation in the Illinois General Assembly that would eliminate tuition waivers awarded to the children of public university employees. Supporters of the bill say the waivers of 50 percent are too expensive for the state to maintain, given its current financial situation.

GOP Would Freeze Pell (Inside Higher Ed)
WASHINGTON -- Kicking off what will likely be months of contentious budget battles, Republicans in the U.S. House of Representatives on Tuesday released a 2016 funding blueprint that calls for freezing the maximum Pell Grant award.

WIU provost selected as president at Pennsylvania university (McDonough County, The Voice)
HARRISBURG, Pa. — Western Illinois University Provost Ken Hawkinson was named to be the 12th president of Kutztown University on Tuesday, assuming the position July 1. The Allentown Morning Call reported Hawkinson was offered a three-year contract with a $245,000 starting salary.

Miller: Students deserve voting power on SIU board (The Southern Illinoisan)
CARBONDALE – SIU’s Board of Trustees will meet for the first time this year on Wednesday and Thursday. But with important budget and tuition discussions on the docket, one trustee worries students’ voices will not be heard.

March 17, 2015

Quote of the day:
“Storms make oaks take deeper root.”
George Herbert

Waivers aside, cost of higher education is real issue (Bloomington Pantagraph)
There is legislation in the Illinois General Assembly that would eliminate tuition waivers awarded to the children of public university employees.

UIC, U. of C. celebrate unity in Obama library bids (Chicago Tribune)
After more than a year of tough competition, the University of Chicago and the University of Illinois at Chicago came together Monday in a show of unity, hosting a community breakfast designed to send a strong message to Barack Obama that the city wants his library regardless of whether it's on the South Side or the West Side..

North Central College student first to earn nation’s only degree in chemical microscopy (Chicago Tribune)
North Central College senior Marissa Bartz is looking forward to June when she'll become the first to complete the nation's only program offering a bachelor's degree in chemical microscopy..

Despite Progress, Only 1 in 4 College Presidents Are Women (Chronicle of Higher Education)
When Cornell University’s new president takes office, in July, half of the Ivy League’s colleges will be led by women.

Education Dept. Considers Creating Not1 but 2 College-Ratings Systems (Chronicle of Higher Education)
The Education Department, under continued fire over its planned college-rating system, is considering creating two systems, an agency official said at a policy briefing here on Monday. - See more at: http://chronicle.com/article/Education-Dept-Considers/228531/#sthash.abz1y7zK.dpuf

DeVry is learning a tough lesson (Crain's Chicago Business)
A pioneer in blue-collar tech training, DeVry reigns as Chicago's biggest brand in for-profit education. Now, it's a touchstone of what went wrong for the industry as regulators scrutinize alleged lending abuses and investors file class-action lawsuits over deceptive recruiting practices.

Letter to Editor: Be wary of four-year degrees at CLC (Daily Herald)
Candidates for the College of Lake County Board of Trustees are extolling the virtues of adding bachelor's degrees to CLC's offerings, if they get elected. What is the cost of this addition to the taxpayers?

Economic Angst, Rose-Colored Views on Race: A Survey of Presidents (Inside Higher Ed)
Inside Higher Ed's 2015 Survey of College and University Presidents.explored the views of presidents on the financial sustainability of their institutions, the Obama administration's rating system, sexual assault, race and their role in the tenure process, among other topics.

Scaling Student Support (Inside Higher Ed)
In the Wild West future of unbundled higher education that has been proposed in various forms by Kevin Carey, Anya Kamenetz, and Jeff Selingo, the targeted student seems to be a solo outlaw, a confident autodidact who hungers for the unbound autonomy of a “DIY” bespoke education.

Community College Transfer Network Expands (Inside Higher Ed)
The American Honors Network, a transfer consortium that links community colleges with four-year institutions, has expanded to include more than 50 partner colleges.

The Impact of Free Tuition (Inside Higher Ed)
Tennessee's free community college program is exceeding expectations. Demand remains high and the state's completion rates for federal aid applications are up, which is putting colleges on notice about a likely influx of students.

The Impact of Free Tuition (Inside Higher Ed)
Tennessee's free community college program is exceeding expectations. Demand remains high and the state's completion rates for federal aid applications are up, which is putting colleges on notice about a likely influx of students.

Maybe school funding rewrite will happen after all (News-Gazette)
Like a snowball slowly growing in size as it rolls down a hill, legislation to rewrite Illinois' school-funding formula continues to build momentum.

Is Illinois walking away from higher education? (Quad-Cities Online)
“Illinois is slowly walking away from higher education,” laments one long-time state government insider who asked not to be identified.

2 Chicago universities urge Obama to put library in city (Quad-City Times)
The two Chicago universities in the competition for President Barack Obama's library came together Monday to send a message to the White House: Choose either one of us, just don't pick New York.

Illinois' College Students Complete School at a Higher Rate Than Most of the Country (The Huffington Post)
Even if Illinois' politicians don't have much they can boast about, Illinois' college students have plenty of reason to be proud about their college completion rates.

Boston College Seeks to Give Others Pause in the Overhaul of Scholarships (The New York Times)
On a recent afternoon, snow fell on Boston College’s tidy campus in suburban Chestnut Hill, piling atop the upper stands of Alumni Stadium and the tennis-style bubble enclosing the football field.

Michelle Obama Going to Asia to Push Education (The New York Times)
Michelle Obama will travel to Japan and Cambodia this week to kick off the administration’s new effort to promote the education of millions of girls worldwide.

Terri Bryant visits Pizza and Politics at SIU (The Southern Illinoisan)
Two months into her term in the Illinois House of Representatives, Terri Bryant (R-Murphysboro) said she thinks lawmakers are ready to cross the aisle to solve the state’s budget woes.

March 16, 2015

Quote of the day:
"Decide whether or not the goal is worth the risks involved. If it is, stop worrying."
Amelia Earhart

Want help paying for college? Apply for scholarships (Belleville News-Democrat)
Now is the time for high school and college students to apply for scholarships available through local organizations and businesses. Read more here: http://www.bnd.com/2015/03/14/3711595/want-help-paying-for-college-apply.html#storylink=cpy

Stanford Chief Wants Higher Ed to Be ‘Affordable, Accessible, Adaptable’ (Chronicle of Higher Education)
American higher education isn’t badly broken, according to John L. Hennessy, president of Stanford University.

Greetings From Wisconsin, Where Higher Ed Is a Love-Hate Affair (Chronicle of Higher Education)
Dear Readers, I’m writing this from the SweetSpot, where people come for coffee, muffins, and conversation.

Median Salaries of Tenured and Tenure-Track Professors at 4-Year Colleges, 2014-15 (Chronicle of Higher Education)
The median base salaries of tenured and tenure-track professors at four-year colleges increased by 2 percent in 2014 — a rate of salary growth that was down a tenth of a percent from the previous year, according to the results of an annual survey released on Monday by the College and University Professional Association for Human Resources.

The Trends Report (Chronicle of Higher Education)
Budget cuts, a skeptical public, uncertain enrollments, new competitors—higher education faces so many challenges these days, and isn’t known for responding nimbly.

Research cooperation grows as federal money tightens (Chronicle of Higher Education)
Phillip D. Levy, an associate professor of emergency medicine at Wayne State University, has often treated black patients from the Detroit area who didn’t even know they had heart disease.

No controversy, just fine dining at community college student-run restaurants (Daily Herald)
Controversy over college spending at the professionally operated Waterleaf restaurant on the College of DuPage campus is in the headlines these days, but that uproar may mask what community colleges are doing at student-run restaurants.

Black Studies Programs Alive, Well (Diverse Issues in Higher Education)
At a time when some universities have publicly questioned the value of Black Studies departments and programs, the presence of hundreds of scholars at this year’s National Council for Black Studies conference is a strong sign that the academic field is indeed growing and thriving.

Decreasing the Tension Level of College Admissions Period (Diverse Issues in Higher Education)
We are approaching that stressful time of year when high school seniors learn if they are accepted into the colleges of their choice and colleges wait expectantly to learn which of those students will decide to deposit and enroll. March 15 – May 15 are tough months in the world of college admissions.

Congress offers college savings plan changes (Herald & Review)
Democrats and Republicans rarely agree on anything these days on Capitol Hill, but one piece of legislation appears to be generating positive vibes from both parties.

4 Articles on Doing Grad Research (Inside Higher Ed)
Every once in a while, you read something that really resonates with you. Something that makes its way into your brain, carves a place for itself, and changes how you see the world.

Off the Rails (Inside Higher Ed)
My first on-campus interview felt much like a chapter from Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland.

Not a Tsunami, But… (Inside Higher Ed)
In 2012, John L. Hennessy, president of Stanford University, famously told The New Yorker that technology was about to dramatically change higher education.

Faculty Pay: Up and Uneven (Inside Higher Ed)
Median base salaries of full-time faculty members at four-year colleges and universities increased by 2 percent in 2014, down from 2.1 percent the year before, according to a report being released today by the College and University Professional Association for Human Resources.

It's break time (News-Gazette)
After a dreary winter of slush and tests, there's that one week of Spring Break, sun and freedom and no locker combinations to remember.

Med school's driving force: Phyllis Wise (News-Gazette)
Amid the congratulatory handshakes and hugs that followed approval of new Carle-Illinois College of Medicine, University of Illinois Trustee Tim Koritz walked up to Chancellor Phyllis Wise.

QU's president to present one-man performance based on Homer's 'Iliad' (Quincy Herald-Whig)
Robert Gervasi, president of Quincy University, is bringing to life one of his most cherished literary works.

Three candidates seek one of two seats on JWCC board (Quincy Herald-Whig)
Three candidates are vying for two seats on the seven-person John Wood Community College Board of Trustees in the April 7 general election.

David Stoesz: The problem with Rauner's war on higher education (Springfield State Journal-Register)
Gov. Bruce Rauner's proposed 31.5 percent cut to higher education is a shot across the bow of Illinois' public universities.

SIU student research explores cattle digestion, grazing options (The Southern Illinoisan)
Lacey Armit knew she’d learn all sorts of things when she undertook her first major research project as a sophomore at Southern Illinois University Carbondale — like, for example, how to laugh at herself. It’s a skill that’s come in handy, even as she has honed her expertise in collecting data and making sense of it.

SIU camp designed to help children focus (The Southern Illinoisan)
Southern Illinois University Carbondale is sponsoring a unique camp for children ages 5-12, helping them focus and improve concentration skills and interact with peers.

SI Music Festival opera canceled over budget woes (The Southern Illinoisan)
Gov. Bruce Rauner’s proposal to slash more than 30 percent from higher education budgets has claimed its first SIU victim.

An incomplete Student Aid Bill of Rights (The Washington Post)
I’m a glass-half-empty person by nature.

ISU’s high retention links with effective programs (University World News)
Any student attending Illinois State University for over a year begins to settle in and feel at home, but now statistics are backing this fact.

March 13, 2015

Quote of the day:
"Without education, your children can never really meet the challenges they will face. So it's very important to give children education and explain that they should play a role for their country."
Nelson Mandela

University presidents decry Rauner cuts (Bloomington Pantagraph)
Gov. Bruce Rauner's plan to cut higher education by more than 31 percent could mean thousands of layoffs, higher student tuition costs and a loss of key programs, university presidents told lawmakers Thursday. In an initial round of hearings to discuss the governor's proposed budget for the fiscal year beginning July 1, a trio of presidents paraded before two committees to argue against the level of cuts Rauner has outlined.

U. of I. trustees approve new medical school (Chicago Tribune)
The University of Illinois board of trustees Thursday approved a new medical school for the Urbana-Champaign campus, a unique engineering-focused program that could enroll students as soon as fall 2017..

After snub, College of DuPage gets threat that lawmakers plan to cut funds (Chicago Tribune)
Frustrated by lavish spending and lax financial oversight at the College of DuPage, Illinois lawmakers threatened Thursday to slash funding to the community college after school officials ignored their deadline to agree to a state-run audit..

University presidents fight deep funding cuts (Chicago Tribune)
Presidents of three state public universities told lawmakers Thursday that GOP Gov. Bruce Rauner's proposal to cut higher education funding by nearly $400 million would lead to significant setbacks at campuses that would reverberate for years..

Waubonsee Community College opens new Sugar Grove fieldhouse (Chicago Tribune)
It's been nearly 14 years since Christine Sobek was hired on as the president of Waubonsee Community College, and just as long since she and her administrative team have been working on a plan that made sweeping changes to the college's facilities..

Cut Through the Hype, and MOOCs Still Have Had a Lasting Impact (Chronicle of Higher Education)
To some people in higher education, "MOOC" has become a punch line.

Illinois Bill Threatens Professors’ Cherished Perk: Tuition Breaks for Their Children (Chronicle of Higher Education)
Illinois lawmakers have put a benefit commonly offered to college employees — tuition breaks for their children — on the chopping block at public universities in response to a big expected cut in state spending on higher education.

Easter will 'have plenty to do' after leaving UI presidency (Chronicle of Higher Education)
After almost 40 years at the University of Illinois, Bob Easter can start counting the time until retirement — his second retirement — in weeks instead of months.

What Happens When a College Tells Students What They'll Pay for All 4 Years? (Chronicle of Higher Education)
As a new group of families laments each year, college is unlike any other purchase. One of its unusual — and frustrating — features is that students learn the bottom-line price of each institution mere weeks before they must decide where to enroll. Even then, they find out only what they’ll pay for their first year.

University chiefs: Rauner budget cuts would be dramatic (Crain's Chicago Business)
Presidents of three state public universities told lawmakers Thursday that GOP Gov. Bruce Rauner's proposal to cut higher education funding by nearly $400 million would lead to significant setbacks at campuses that would reverberate for years. The officials from Western, Southern and Eastern Illinois Universities told a Senate panel that the cuts — a 31 percent reduction in state funds to each school's budget —

Waubonsee hopefuls differ on school's tuition policy (Daily Herald)
Three candidates for the Waubonsee Community College board disagreed about increasing tuition for students during a candidate forum Wednesday night in Sugar Grove.

Addressing Disconnect Between Student Skills and Employer Needs (Education Week)
What students are learning in school and what employers need on the job often are two different sets of skills.

Fitch Downgrades Roosevelt University (Education Week)
Fitch Downgrades Roosevelt University (IL) Revs to 'BBB-'; Outlook Stable | Business Wire Fitch Downgrades Roosevelt University (IL) Revs to 'BBB-'; Outlook Stable March 12, 2015 10:31 AM Eastern Daylight Time

University presidents say 31 percent too big a cut (Herald & Review)
Gov. Bruce Rauner's plan to cut higher education by more than 31 percent could mean thousands of layoffs, higher student tuition costs and a loss of key programs, university presidents told lawmakers Thursday.

Ending tuition break would hurt ISU (Herald & Review)
Officials at Illinois State University say a legislative proposal to eliminate tuition discounts for the children of university employees could hurt recruitment and retention of workers and contribute to the problem of students leaving Illinois to go to college.

Wanting More Say (Inside Higher Ed)
Do most presidents really want a bigger role in faculty hiring and tenure decisions? Inside Higher Ed’s annual Survey of College and University Presidents suggests they do.

Uber, Badging and Higher Ed (Inside Higher Ed)
What will happen to legacy higher education providers when the ownership society ceases to exist?

Don’t Only Call Us in a Crisis (Inside Higher Ed)
Title IX and gender-based compliance. Alcohol and drug abuse prevention. Mental health. Student privacy.

'No Significant Differences' in Student Outcomes by Mode of Delivery (Inside Higher Ed)
The nonprofit research organization Ithaka S+R is back with another look at the many studies that compare student outcomes from face-to-face and online or hybrid courses, and once again, the results show "no significant differences" between the two modes of delivery.

Economic Angst, Rose-Colored Views on Race: A Survey of Presidents (Inside Higher Ed)
Fewer than 4 in 10 college presidents express confidence in the financial sustainability of their institutions over the next decade.

Wanting More Say (Inside Higher Ed)
Do most presidents really want a bigger role in faculty hiring and tenure decisions? Inside Higher Ed’s annual Survey of College and University Presidents suggests they do. And some of them are playing a larger role than faculty leaders might find reasonable.

Opinion: Don’t Only Call Us in a Crisis (Inside Higher Ed)
Title IX and gender-based compliance. Alcohol and drug abuse prevention. Mental health. Student privacy. First Amendment expression. Threats to campus safety.

Easter will 'have plenty to do' after leaving UI presidency (News-Gazette)
URBANA — After almost 40 years at the University of Illinois, Bob Easter can start counting the time until retirement — his second retirement — in weeks instead of months.

It's official: Campus gets first new college in 60 years (News-Gazette)
After a year of study, the first new college at the University of Illinois' flagship campus in almost 60 years is now official.

University chiefs: Rauner budget cuts would be dramatic (Springfield State Journal-Register)
Presidents of three state public universities told lawmakers Thursday that Republican Gov. Bruce Rauner's proposal to cut higher education funding by nearly $400 million would lead to significant setbacks at campuses that would reverberate for years.

U of I trustees approve new medical school (Springfield State Journal-Register)
University of Illinois trustees signed off on a plan Thursday to create a new engineering-based medical school at the Urbana-Champaign campus that will rely on a mix of private and public funds.

University of Illinois president to step down month early (Springfield State Journal-Register)
University of Illinois officials say President Robert Easter will step down about a month early.

Higher education isn’t in crisis (The Washington Post)
Imagine, if you will, an American business that other countries, from China to Saudi Arabia, seek to emulate.

How can we track trends in educational attainment by parental income? (University World News)
There are many Americans who would benefit from a postsecondary education but who never attend college, or who start college but don’t earn a degree.

March 12, 2015

Quote of the day:
“The teacher is one who makes two ideas grow where only one grew before.”
Elbert Hubbard

SIUE nursing school makes national listing (Belleville News-Democrat)
A focus on developing nurse practitioners, anesthetists and educators has put the graduate nursing school at Southern Illinois University Edwardsville on a national listing for the first time. Read more here: http://www.bnd.com/2015/03/11/3704899_siue-nursing-school-makes-national.html?rh=1#storylink=cpy

U of Illinois trustees consider new medical school (Chicago Sun-Times)
URBANA, Ill. — University of Illinois trustees will vote on a plan to open a new engineering-based medical school at the Urbana-Champaign campus. Trustees are scheduled to meet Thursday in Urbana.

ECC boosts tuition rate, but not for foreign students (Chicago Tribune)
Elgin Community College board members voted Tuesday to raise tuition by $5 an hour, to $119, for students who live or work inside Community College District 509.

College of DuPage may ban employees from expensing alcohol purchases (Chicago Tribune)
The College of DuPage would ban reimbursements for alcohol as part of a series of actions proposed Wednesday following a Chicago Tribune report on lavish spending by top school administrators at the campus' high-end restaurant..

Illinois pension law greeted with court skepticism (Chicago Tribune)
A lawyer for the state faced skeptical questioning from Illinois Supreme Court justices Wednesday as she defended a landmark pension reform law by arguing that benefit cuts to public workers were a response to a financial emergency tied to the Great Recession.

Illinois Bill Threatens Professors’ Cherished Perk: Tuition Breaks for Their Children (Chronicle of Higher Education)
Illinois lawmakers have put a benefit commonly offered to college employees — tuition breaks for their children — on the chopping block at public universities in response to a big expected cut in state spending on higher education.

Keeping Adjuncts Engaged Is Key to Helping Community-College Students Stay on Track (Chronicle of Higher Education)
Professional development is more important than ever for adjunct professors at community colleges, according to speakers here at the annual meeting of the League for Innovation in the Community College.

Can Robert Putnam Save the American Dream? (Chronicle of Higher Education)
The event is billed as a lecture on a new book of social science. But the speaker visiting Cambridge’s Lesley University this Monday night sounds like a political candidate on the hustings. Robert D. Putnam ­— Harvard political scientist, trumpeter of community revival, consultant to the last four presidents ­— is on campus to sound an alarm. "What I want to talk to you about," he tells some 40 students and academics, is "the most important domestic challenge facing our country today.

Grant will aid Illinois State research on bisphenol (Google News)
The National Institutes of Health has awarded a $425,000 grant to a pair of Illinois State University researchers studying a chemical found in many food containers and other…

In Illinois, higher education is suffering (Google News)
For the coming year, Gov. Bruce Rauner has proposed cutting direct appropriations for our public colleges and universities by almost $400 million, or about 20 percent.

Officials: Ending tuition break would hurt ISU (Herald & Review)
NORMAL — Officials at Illinois State University say a legislative proposal to eliminate tuition discounts for the children of university employees could hurt recruitment and retention of workers and contribute to the problem of students leaving Illinois to go to college. But the chief sponsor of House Bill 403, state Rep. Jack Franks, D-Marengo, said Tuesday, “I think it's an indefensible perk.”

What's in a Name? (Inside Higher Ed)
Politicians in Georgia are pushing forward with a proposal to rebrand the state’s technical college system, despite opposition from retired college leaders and the system's regional accreditor.

Zeroed Out in Arizona (Inside Higher Ed)
The idea of increasing access to community colleges and opening the gateway to higher education has taken root among state officials and at the White House. States may not be prepared, or eager, to foot the bill on that idea, but they are open to the concept.

Feds’ Debt Collector Drama (Inside Higher Ed)
WASHINGTON -- Two of the debt collection companies that the U.S. Department of Education earlier this month accused of misleading borrowers could potentially continue to collect defaulted loans on the department’s behalf under a different contract.

Former U.S. House Education Chairman Joins Cengage (Inside Higher Ed)
George Miller, a former congressman from California who served as the chairman of the U.S. House education committee, will join Cengage Learning in an advisory role, the company announced on Wednesday.

First Muslim University in U.S. Is Accredited (Inside Higher Ed)
Zaytuna College has become the first accredited Muslim college in the United States, after the college commission of the Western Association of Schools and Colleges granted its approval, The Los Angeles Times reported. Zaytuna is based in Berkeley, Calif.

Marketing Lessons From Sweet Briar (Inside Higher Ed)
As media response and alumnae outrage grew after last week’s announcement that Sweet Briar College will soon close its doors, the focus of the debate centered around whether the college leadership was courageous in seeing a dismal future and responding promptly, or precipitous in abandoning hope before it was truly necessary.

Can We End 'The End of College' Already? (Inside Higher Ed)
I was looking forward to engaging seriously with education researcher and think-tanker Kevin Carey’s new book, The End of College, but then I read this sentence in his recent New York Times op-ed that was inspired by some of the material from the book: “The failure of MOOCs to disrupt higher education has nothing to do with the quality of the courses themselves, many of which are quite good and getting better.”

Bachelor's degree proposal being considered (Journal Gazette & Times-Courier)
MATTOON -- The Illinois Community College Trustees Association is scheduled Saturday to consider supporting a proposal to allow colleges to offer bachelor's degrees for nursing and other applied career areas. This proposal from the Illinois Council of Community College Presidents was written by a committee that included Lake Land College President Josh Bullock.

UI unified in support for academic professionals (News-Gazette)
University of Illinois staffers put up a unified front speaking for the importance of academic professionals in some positions at a hearing Wednesday.

College of Medicine decision expected (News-Gazette)
With trustee approval expected today, the University of Illinois will be on a "fast march" toward opening a new College of Medicine in Urbana by the fall 2017 target, officials say.

Easter supports Urbana College of Medicine (The Daily Illini)
Before recommending the Board of Trustees vote in approval of a proposal to open a College of Medicine on the Urbana campus, President Robert Easter said he had previously been as skeptical as anyone.

How to Improve Graduation Rates at Community Colleges (The New York Times)
Community colleges are intended to be gateways to careers or to four-year colleges offering bachelor’s degrees. Unfortunately, they have very low graduation rates. Just 20 percent of full-time students seeking a degree get one within three years. That number rises to 35 percent after five years, but by then another 45 percent have given up completely and are no longer enrolled.

Sanders named to State Board of Education (The Southern Illinoisan)
Gov. Bruce Rauner selected John Sanders, 52, of Marion to the Illinois State Board of Education on Friday, according to a news release from the governor's office.

The 10 states with the most student debt (Yahoo News)
Washington, D.C., has been called one of America's most college-educated cities (PDF).

March 11, 2015

Quote of the day:
"Live so that when your children think of fairness and integrity, they think of you."
H. Jackson Brown, Jr.

Officials say ending tuition break would hurt ISU (Bloomington Pantagraph)
Officials at Illinois State University say a legislative proposal to eliminate tuition discounts for the children of university employees could hurt recruitment and retention of workers and contribute to the problem of students leaving Illinois to go to college.

UIC students likely to see health insurance rate increase (Chicago Sun-Times)
Students at the University of Illinois at Chicago will see their health insurance rates jump by 21 percent this fall if college trustees approve the increase at a regularly scheduled meeting this week.

NIU credits can be used to finish ECC degree (Chicago Tribune)
It's an important part of Illinois' community-college system that credits earned in one of those two-year college can count toward an eventual bachelor's degree at a four-year university or college.

What Might an Apple Watch for Higher Education Look Like? (Chronicle of Higher Education)
An Apple Watch that’s tailored to meet the needs of academics could be the next big thing in higher education. Someday. - See more at: http://chronicle.com/blogs/wiredcampus/what-might-an-apple-watch-for-higher-education-look-like/56041#sthash.XiY8GaIk.dpuf

NIU, ECC ink deal allowing reverse credit transfer (Daily Herald)
Northern Illinois University students who haven't completed their two-year associate degree from Elgin Community College now can transfer credit from NIU courses to graduate from ECC.

Obama Aims to Clamp Down on Federal Student Loan Servicers (Diverse Issues in Higher Education)
President Barack Obama says college affordability isn’t just important for students, but for the nation as well.

Forgoing Two-Year Institutions Better for At-Risk Students (Diverse Issues in Higher Education)
Low-income students who are academically marginal are more likely to complete college when they forgo two-year institutions and choose higher-quality four-year institutions than they do ordinarily, according to a new study released recently by the National Bureau of Economic Research.

Thurgood Marshall College Fund and Apple Announce Partnership (Diverse Issues in Higher Education)
Thurgood Marshall College Fund and Apple announced an over $40 million, multi-year partnership to identify and develop talent from HBCUs.

The Hypocrisy of Black College Hatred (Diverse Issues in Higher Education)
During the month of February, the C-SPAN bus traveled to eight historically Black college campuses to provide viewers with insight on these institutions. Since these are my colleagues,

Community Colleges’ Role as MSIs Expanding (Diverse Issues in Higher Education)
Although they often operate at the margins, nearly 22 percent of the nation’s community colleges are minority-serving institutions and are responsible for enrolling about 55 percent of college-going minorities, according to a new report released by the Center for Minority Servings Institutions at the University of Pennsylvania.

Why Student Loans Are Different (Education Next)
Findings From Six Focus Groups of Student Loan Borrowers

Postsecondary Success Advocacy Priorities (Inside Higher Ed)
The nation’s postsecondary education system faces a convergence of powerful and challenging forces. One is

Next Phase for Gates's Completion Agenda (Inside Higher Ed)
After spending roughly half a billion dollars on the college completion agenda during the last seven years, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation is ready to be more assertive about what it thinks should happen in four key areas of higher education policy.

Can Technology Get More Students Through College? (National Journal)
The immediate concern of the first-year student who had come to meet with Whitney Hammond, an advisor at Northern Virginia Community College, was whether failing a math class would affect her financial aid. But as the student unraveled her worries, it became clear that math wasn't her only problem.

Med school proposal to be revealed (News-Gazette)
After a year of study, a proposal for a new engineering-focused medical school in Urbana could get a green light from top university administrators today.

UI job classification hearings set for Urbana (News-Gazette)
An ongoing dispute about job classifications for hundreds of University of Illinois employees is expected to draw a crowd at a public hearing of the State Universities Civil Service System today in Urbana.

Illinois State University names new provost (Peoria Journal Star)
Illinois State University has named one of its former deans as the school’s next provost. - See more at: http://www.pjstar.com/article/20150310/NEWS/150319887#sthash.v7kyu84F.dpuf

Peggy Staehlin: Illinois setting high goals for education (Springfield State Journal-Register)
Schools and parents are expressing angst over Illinois' change in state standards and assessment of meeting those standards. - See more at: http://www.sj-r.com/article/20150310/OPINION/150319936/-1/json#sthash.7JdSoIbi.dpuf

Epicuriousity 101: Welcome to the LLCC kitchen (Springfield State Journal-Register)
Are you curious about food? Like where to buy a purple carrot, how to make the perfect barbecue sauce for your summer grilling, what to cook with your kids, or when to plant the seeds of future juicy, ripe tomatoes? - See more at: http://www.sj-r.com/article/20150310/ENTERTAINMENTLIFE/150319927/-1/json#sthash.kOVSrpMD.dpuf

SIUE spring enrollment climbs to record high (St. Louis Post-Dispatch)
Southern Illinois University Edwardsville’s spring 2015 semester has grown by 300 students from spring 2014 and full-time spring enrollment has reached an all-time high, according to a press release.

Power outage closes eight SIU buildings (The Southern Illinoisan)
An early morning power outage has forced the closure of eight Southern Illinois University buildings.

Power outage closes eight SIU buildings (The Southern Illinoisan)
An early morning power outage has forced the closure of eight Southern Illinois University buildings.

March 10, 2015

Quote of the day:
"In an effective classroom students should not only know what they are doing, they should also know why and how."
Harry K. Wong

Enrollment at Lindenwood University Belleville continues to climb (Belleville News-Democrat)
Lindenwood Belleville is again enjoying brisk growth thanks, in part, to the opening of its new Collinsville center. Read more here: http://www.bnd.com/2015/03/09/3701364/enrollment-at-lindenwood-university.html#storylink=cpy

State lawmakers heighten calls for College of DuPage review (Chicago Tribune)
State lawmakers turned up the pressure for a comprehensive audit of the College of DuPage following a Tribune investigation that uncovered lavish spending by school officials at the campus's upscale restaurant.

25 Years Later, Has Clery Made Campuses Safer? (Chronicle of Higher Education)
A masked man pointed a gun at a student and commanded her to get in his car, not far from the center of the University of Connecticut’s campus.

Obama to Expand Protections for Student-Loan Borrowers (Chronicle of Higher Education)
In a speech he’s scheduled to give on Tuesday at the Georgia Institute of Technology, President Obama will announce a Student Aid Bill of Rights and sign a presidential memorandum directing federal agencies to take steps to help borrowers repay their debt.

Community Colleges Find New Strategies to Break Through ‘Initiative Fatigue’ (Chronicle of Higher Education)
Suffering from "initiative fatigue" and stymied by "curmudgeons" intent on blocking new ideas, community colleges are nonetheless making progress on promising new strategies for reaching students at greatest risk of dropping out, according to speakers here at the annual meeting of the League for Innovation in the Community College.

Social-Media Skirmishes (Chronicle of Higher Education)
A professor of American Indian studies takes to Twitter to denounce Zionism.

Student engagement is improving (Community College Daily)
More community college students are actively participating in class and collaboring with peers on their own time, according to a new report by the Center for Community College Student Engagement (CCCSE).

NIU law dean named to 2015 Power List (Daily Chronicle)
Northern Illinois University College of Law Dean Jennifer Rosato Perea has been named to the 2015 Lawyers of Color Fourth Annual Power List, a comprehensive catalog of the nation’s most influential minority attorneys and nonminority diversity advocates.

COD critics aim to force Breuder out after election (Daily Herald)
A move to oust controversial College of DuPage President Robert Breuder -- and perhaps "claw back" his $762,868 retirement agreement -- is likely to be attempted by Trustee Kathy Hamilton and other critics after next month's election.

Rethinking Higher Education in Illinois (Dekalb Daily Chronicle)
Given the dynamic nature of the 21st century workforce, the changing landscape of higher education and the serious financial challenges faced by the state of Illinois, it is up to public universities in the state to think of innovative ways to efficiently deliver a high-quality, affordable education.

Summit Confronts Student Equity and Success for Black Males at Community Colleges (Diverse Issues in Higher Education)
Los Angeles – With more than 500 attendees, today caps the 8th annual African- American Male Education Network & Development (A2MEND) meeting, highlighting equity minded approaches to success for African-American men in community colleges.

Rep. Franks proposes to end tuition waivers (Google News)
The University employs 2,548 faculty members, 3,665 administrative and academic professional staff and 4,136 support staff at the Urbana campus alone. Sam LeRoy, freshman in Business, is just one of these employees’ dependents who is currently eligible to receive a 50 percent tuition waiver to attend the University.

'Bill of Rights' for Student Borrowers (Inside Higher Ed)
The Obama administration will announce Tuesday that it plans to create a centralized complaint system for federal student loan borrowers as well as a single Web site where they can manage their loan payments.

Get Over the Guilt (Inside Higher Ed)
When I began my position at the Scripps Research Institute, I consistently observed one thing about the career training and professional development programs I administered: the low percentage of trainees in attendance relative to the total population.

Districts to decide how to handle PARCC refusals (News-Gazette)
After Amanda Richardson attended an informational night about the PARCC exam for Jamaica Elementary parents like herself, she promptly made the decision to keep her straight-A, fourth-grade son from taking the test.

UI censure decision coming in May (News-Gazette)
Sometime between now and late May, a national organization created to defend academic freedom will decide whether to censure the University of Illinois for its handling of the Steven Salaita case.

The Numbers Add Up To This: Less And Less Opportunity For Poor Kids (NPR)
In this country, all children are supposed to have a shot at success — a chance to jump "from rags to riches" in one generation.

The Common Core standards are supposed to get students ready for college. (POLITICO)
The Common Core standards are supposed to get students ready for college. Read more: http://www.politico.com/story/2015/03/colleges-not-ready-for-college-ready-common-core-115881.html#ixzz3TzbRVM78

CSI’s Chicago Campus to Host World Day Event (PR Newswire)
From March 9th to March 14th, CSI’s Chicago campus will host a Week of Expression to promote cultural exchange among students. On March 10th, the campus will celebrate World Day, a special event where students will share presentations about their cultural backgrounds.

President Obama's free community college planresonates with teens (Springfield State Journal-Register)
For many teens, graduation is just around the corner. - See more at: http://www.sj-r.com/article/20150309/ENTERTAINMENTLIFE/150309473/-1/json#sthash.ptm7XInK.dpuf

ISU names former dean as new provost (Springfield State Journal-Register)
Illinois State University has named one of its former deans as the school's next provost. - See more at: http://www.sj-r.com/article/20150310/NEWS/150319984#sthash.39dbAjVe.dpuf

Letter: Children aren't standardized, so why is testing? (Springfield State Journal-Register)
I am writing in response to the March 3 article, "More than 1M Illinois students to take new standardized test." - See more at: http://www.sj-r.com/article/20150309/OPINION/150309449/-1/json#sthash.1JGja8y5.dpuf

Removing tuition waivers not the best way to save money (The Daily Illini)
For University of Illinois employees, as well as employees at public universities across the state,, tuition waivers are a major perk to their job because it provides helpful benefits in regards to paying for their children’s education. For University of Illinois employees, as well as employees at public universities across the state, tuition waivers are a major perk to their job because it provides helpful benefits in regards to paying for their children’s education.

Could it be that the teaching profession isn’t pink enough? (The Hechinger Report)
More than three-quarters of U.S. public school teachers are female.

Activities at Y.M.C.A.: Laps, Yoga and Helping Syracuse Cheat (The New York Times)
College athletics officials have engaged many types of nefarious characters over the years — the booster with the slush fund for Southern Methodist football players, the man who paid Michigan basketball players to help conceal his gambling profits, the now-imprisoned investor who lavished millions on athletes at Miami.

Here’s What Will Truly Change Higher Education: Online Degrees That Are Seen as Official (The New York Times)
Three years ago, technology was going to transform higher education. What happened?

SIU debate team in search of third straight national title (The Southern Illinoisan)
Southern Illinois University's debate team is hoping to make history Sunday.

Saluki administrators nervous of final state budget numbers (The Southern Illinoisan)
SIU administrators began meeting two weeks ago to prepare for a potential cut of up to $32 million dollars in fiscal year 2016 for the Carbondale campus, but they are hopeful the final hit will be significantly less.

Obama plans to make it easier to pay your student loans (The Washington Post)
President Obama is set to sign a presidential memorandum Tuesday directing federal agencies to overhaul the way Americans repay their student loans.

U of I Announces Opposition to Tuition Waiver Plan (U.S. News University)
The University of Illinois says it's against the idea of cutting tuition waivers for the children of employees of the university.

Outcomes and Experience Central to Non-Traditional Students’ Value Equation (University Business Magazine)
Non-traditional students are far more focused on outcomes than their traditional-aged counterparts.

Supporting first-gen college students (University Business Magazine)
Thirty percent of higher ed students today are the first in their family to attend college, while 24 percent—4.5 million—are both first-generation and low-income.

March 9, 2015

Quote of the day:
"Storms make oaks take deeper root."
George Herbert

Trends in Community College Enrollment and Completion Data, 2015 (Association of American Colleges and Universities)
This is the second of a series of reports on trends in national community college enrollments. National community college enrollments continue to decrease, with variations at the state and local levels.

Kay: Schools should have to get court order for student passwords (Belleville News-Democrat)
A state lawmaker from the metro-east is pushing legislation that he says will make it more difficult for schools to acquire students’ passwords to their social media accounts. Read more here: http://www.bnd.com/2015/03/07/3698159_local-lawmaker-says-schools-should.html?rh=1#storylink=cpy

Beyond filling in bubbles (Belleville News-Democrat)
The majority of Illinois schools soon will begin administering a new test to third- through eighth-graders and some high school students.

$10 million Pritzker gift helps U. of C. expand evidence-based labs projects (Chicago Sun-Times)
The University of Chicago is using a $10 million gift from the Pritzker family foundation to create a network of five laboratories to design and test solutions to the inner city’s toughest issues: Crime, health, education, poverty and wise use of energy and the environment.

Community-College Students’ Engagement Levels Rise (Chronicle of Higher Education)
Today’s community college-students are more likely to come to class prepared, participate in class presentations, and discuss career plans with their instructors and advisers, according to a report that compares the engagement levels of nearly two million students at 853 colleges in 2004 and 2014.

Students Are Making Demands to Spur Campus Change. What Do They Really Want? (Chronicle of Higher Education)
A recent wave of student-led protests on campuses is playing out like a series of Ping-Pong matches: Student activists, upset by what they see as their administration’s lackluster performance on diversity-related issues, present demands and stage demonstrations to gain attention.

Republican Governors' Shared Goals for Higher Ed: Accountability and Work-Force Preparation (Chronicle of Higher Education)
Gov. Scott Walker of Wisconsin is proposing to cut $300-million from the state’s university system over the next two years.

Will County-area community colleges satisfied with Rauner's budget proposal (Community College Daily)
Community college leaders support Gov. Bruce Rauner’s budget proposal, since they say it will support institutions they call the economic drivers for communities.

Fabricating The Future (Community College Daily)
Administrators at Independence Community College had no intention of making national and international headlines when they were planning for a Fab Lab for their small rural campus in Independence, Kan.

Rauner picks District 214 administrator to lead community college board (Daily Herald)
Northwest Suburban High School District 214 Associate Superintendent Lazaro Lopez was named chairman of the Illinois Community College Board by Gov. Bruce Rauner Friday.

President Obama Talks Justice, Higher Ed Costs at Benedict College (Diverse Issues in Higher Education)
High tuition costs, the “uphill battle” of HBCUs, and the federal decision not to charge the White police officer who fatally shot 18-year-old Mike Brown in Ferguson, Mo., were among the issues that students and parents raised with President Barack Obama during a town hall meeting Friday at Benedict College.

Wanted: Better Skill Matching, Less Job Training (Forbes)
The trouble with skill development is that it does not avail itself to quick government fixes.

Higher education focuses on degree completion (Northwest Indiana Times)
As regional university leaders continue to foster a community where students are supported by faculty members and academic counselors, their biggest challenges remain affordability and degree completion.

U of I to oppose elimination of employee tuition waivers (Springfield State Journal-Register)
University of Illinois officials say they will oppose a plan in the legislature to abolish the 50 percent tuition waivers offered to children of state university employees. - See more at: http://www.sj-r.com/article/20150308/NEWS/150309508#sthash.HVYSEiZX.dpuf

Jeff Vose: Vision 20/20 a blueprint for Illinois education worth supporting (Springfield State Journal-Register)
It is time for local communities to take back the conversation about public education in Illinois.

City gains grant to boost college completion rates (USA TODAY)
Springfield has been selected to join a national network that assists communities with significantly improving the number of high school graduates who go on to be successful in college and the workplace

March 6, 2015

Quote of the day:
“You are today where your thoughts have brought you; you will be tomorrow where your thoughts take you.”
James Allen

Plan would ax tuition breaks for kids of university employees; 165 get waiver at SIUE (Belleville News-Democrat)
SPRINGFIELD – An Illinois lawmaker is proposing that the state do away with tuition breaks for children of employees at public universities. A plan from Rep. Jack Franks, D-Woodstock, would phase out the 50 percent tuition waivers over the next four years. New students would not get them next fall.

College of DuPage officials drink, eat well on taxpayers' dime (Chicago Tribune)
With a dozen bottles of wine, pate and $70 prix fixe plates, College of DuPage President Robert Breuder hosted a holiday dinner for the school's board of trustees in December 2013 at the campus' high-end restaurant, Waterleaf. The tab — $2,331 — was paid by taxpayers..

State rep wants to end break for college employees' kids (Chicago Tribune)
n Illinois lawmaker is proposing that the state do away with tuition breaks for children of employees at its public universities..

Madigan forms education funding panel (Herald & Review)
SPRINGFIELD – For nearly two years, talks designed to revamp Illinois' school funding formula have been focused on the Illinois Senate. On Thursday, a spotlight on the thorny, regionally divisive issue turned to the House when Speaker Michael Madigan announced the creation of a bipartisan task force to study how the state distributes funding to Illinois’ public schools.

Ag students lobby for education funding (Herald & Review)
SPRINGFIELD – About 550 Illinois students involved in agriculture education lobbied legislators at the Capitol on Thursday to keep funding in the budget for the programs. Gov. Bruce Rauner is proposing to eliminate the entire $1.8 million budget for ag education as one step toward balancing the state's spending plan.

The Digital Skills Divide (Inside Higher Ed)
Colleges can bridge the "middle skills" career gap by offering more courses focused on digital skills, a new report suggests.

How a state where community colleges have been an afterthought is turning that around (The Hechinger Report)
Ryan Lombardini will finish his training this spring in electrical engineering. He’s headed into a competitive program in robotics and mechatronics—a cutting-edge combination of mechanical, electrical, telecommunications, and computer engineering—for which he’ll have to put on hold the business he started in high school designing and installing surveillance systems for customers all over the country.

The Federal Government Has No Idea How Much Americans Owe On Student Loans (The Huffington Post)
Americans collectively owe lenders some $1.32 trillion on their student loans. Or at least $1.14 trillion. Or $708 billion. Or $1.16 trillion.

Adjunct instructors struggle to make ends meet (The Southern Illinoisan)
CARTERVILLE — Ken “Fog” Gilbert has a master’s degree and 21 years of experience teaching English at the college level. Yet, like a growing number of faculty members at the nation’s colleges and universities, the veteran instructor struggles to make ends meet.

I was a professor at four universities. I still couldn’t make ends meet. (The Washington Post)
Last week was the first ever National Adjunct Walkout Day, a grassroots protest to push for fair pay and better working conditions. Protests and teach-ins took place on as many as 100 campuses nationwide, prompting at least one university to create a task force to address labor concerns.

March 5, 2015

Quote of the day:
"A taste for truth at any cost is a passion which spares nothing."
Albert Camus

States Are Slashing College Budgets and Raising Tuition (Bloomberg.com)
In 48 U.S. states, government spending on each college student is still below where it was before the recession that ended almost six years ago.

How NORC at the University of Chicago is innovating research, data use (Chicago Tribune)
Our lives are increasingly driven by rapidly changing data and technology. So NORC at the University of Chicago announced in January that it created NORC Labs to test and incubate new research tools, methods and products.

Northwestern's $92 million gift will go toward biomedical research (Chicago Tribune)
Northwestern University is on a fundraising roll.. A month after announcing its largest gift ever, the university has secured another significant donation: nearly $100 million for its medical school.

Republican Governors' Shared Goals for Higher Ed: Accountability and Work-Force Preparation (Chronicle of Higher Education)
Gov. Scott Walker of Wisconsin is proposing to cut $300-million from the state’s university system over the next two years. Across the Great Lakes, his fellow Republican governors in Michigan and Ohio are pushing for increases in their states’ higher-education spending.

What a Promise of Financial Aid Might Mean to a Middle Schooler (Chronicle of Higher Education)
Aspiring college students are asked to take their future on faith. They’re expected to strive to reach a higher-education experience many of them can hardly imagine, to trust they’ll find a way to foot the bill for one of the most expensive purchases they’ll ever make.

Just How Private Are College Students’ Campus Counseling Records? (Chronicle of Higher Education)
The U.S. Department of Education on Wednesday weighed in on an alleged case of sexual assault at the University of Oregon that has prompted heated debate about how privacy protections apply to students’ therapy records.

With outcome-based funding on the rise in higher ed, what works? (Complete College America)
Higher enrollment means nothing if students don't cross the finish line

College is 'worth it' butmajors matter (Complete College America)
Unemployment rates are falling for most college majors, and the employment gap between college graduates and those with merely a high school diploma continues to make college a good, almost necessary bargain, says a new report using Census Bureau data. Read more at http://national.deseretnews.com/article/3691/College-is-worth-it-but-majors-matter.html#w6iDp2Vu664Fx16B.99

Free Community College: It Works (Complete College America)
President Obama's free community college proposal has a direct ancestor in a program Tulsa Community College began in 2007.

Florida couple with deep ties to Northwestern donate $92 million (Crain's Chicago Business)
Northwestern University trustee and alumnus Louis Simpson and his wife, businesswoman Kimberly Querrey, have donated $92 million to Northwestern University to support biomedical research at Feinberg School of Medicine. The gift comes just a year after the couple made a $25 million gift to Northwestern to endow the Louis A. Simpson and Kimberly K. Querrey Institute for BioNanotechnology in Medicine.

Editorial: The key to standardized tests is how we use them (Daily Herald)
It is becoming next to impossible to keep up with the explosion of capital letters related to assessing what students or prospective students know. ISAT, PSAE, IAA, DLM-AA, NAEP, TIMSS, PSAT, ACT, SAT, PSAT, GMAT, LSAT

State should opt out of PARCC testing (Daily Herald)
Parents of school aged children have probably heard of the Partnership for Assessment of Readiness for College and Careers test, more commonly referred to as the PARCC, a standardized test based on the Common Core state standards.

Support grows to simplify government’s college-aid form (Herald & Review)
For many students, the road to college begins before they ever set foot on a campus, with filling out a form. A long one.

Debt Relief for Corinthian Students? (Inside Higher Ed)
The Obama administration, under pressure from Congressional Democrats and consumer advocates, is deciding whether to relieve the debt of some federal student loan borrowers who attended Corinthian Colleges.

Free Community College: It Works (Inside Higher Ed)
President Obama's free community college proposal has a direct ancestor in a program Tulsa Community College began in 2007.

Distance Ed Myths Debunked (Inside Higher Ed)
In fall 2013, one in every eight students enrolled at colleges and universities in the U.S. studied exclusively online.

Women's History Awareness Month events continue (Journal Gazette & Times-Courier)
Several film screenings and guest lectures highlight Eastern Illinois University Women's History Awareness Month as March continues.

Prominent activist cancels U of I speech over Salaita (Springfield State Journal-Register)
A prominent civil rights activist and academic has cancelled a speech at the University of Illinois because of the school's decision to rescind a job offer to a Native American studies professor. - See more at: http://www.sj-r.com/article/20150305/NEWS/150309731#sthash.UipIfA5R.dpuf

Prior experience not a deal-breaker in SIU AD search (The Southern Illinoisan)
SIU's next athletic director must be familiar with the Missouri Valley Conference, but prior experience as an athletic director is not a prerequisite, according to Randy Dunn, SIU president.

March 4, 2015

Quote of the day:
"You don't write because you want to say something, you write because you have something to say."
F. Scott Fitzgerald

COD president cancels forum for trustee candidates (Beacon News)
College of DuPage President Robert Breuder has banned a forum for Board of Trustee candidates from taking place on campus, college spokesman Joe Moore said..

PARCC part of overuse in testing (Bloomington Pantagraph)
The Bloomington-Normal Student Union has just launched a refusal campaign against the PARCC test.

Open House to Showcase Grad & Undergrad Degrees Available through University Center of Lake County (Chicago Tribune)
The University Center of Lake County will host an open house on Thursday, March 19 from 6 - 8 pm at the University Center's Grayslake facility (1200 University Center Drive). In one visit, attendees can learn about more than 100 degree and certificate programs, meet university program representatives, and maybe even win some cash. Southern Illinois University Edwardsville, UC's newest member, will participate in this event for the first time..

Is Sweet Briar’s Closure a Warning Sign for Other Small Colleges? (Chronicle of Higher Education)
Tuesday’s announcement that Sweet Briar College will close later this year despite still having $84-million in its endowment comes as a grim reality check for small liberal-arts colleges that have been facing enrollment and financial challenges in recent years—and particularly for the dwindling number of small women’s colleges.

Under Increasing Financial Pressure, Colleges Consider Mergers—Cautiously (Chronicle of Higher Education)
Laura Schweitzer, president of Union Graduate College, and Anthony G. Collins, president of Clarkson University, take pains to emphasize that their two institutions are strong.

How One University Unexpectedly Found Itself Ranked Among the ‘25 Most Dangerous Colleges’ (Chronicle of Higher Education)
A colleague told Tom Delahunt the news: Drake University had been named one of the nation’s "25 Most Dangerous Colleges."

How the Pressure on Public Colleges Plays Out in One State (Chronicle of Higher Education)
Rising tuition costs at public universities, coupled with a decline in state support, have raised questions across the country about how those trends are affecting access to college, enrollment numbers, and graduation rates.

New critical-thinking state tests cause angst (Daily Herald)
Growing angst over the state's new standardized achievement test has suburban educators crossing their fingers that testing goes smoothly.

Diverse Conversations: Obama and Diversity on College Campuses (Diverse Issues in Higher Education)
With less than two years left in office, President Barack Obama still has a lofty agenda when it comes to education in America.

Arkansas House Supports Guns on Campus Bill (Diverse Issues in Higher Education)
Arkansas House members on Monday sided with arguments that decisions about guns on college campuses should be made by the Legislature, not educators.

Classroom Coles County: Day No. 3 (Inside Higher Ed)
We are all “falling” in love with Mattoon (Bill and Edwin quite literally as it was quite slippery (Tuesday) morning). (Tuesday) was packed, but we will first give you a recap of what happened last night.

SAT Thresholds and Student Success (Inside Higher Ed)
For those students on the cusp of meeting minimum SAT requirements to enter college, where they choose to enroll could determine their chance of eventually earning a bachelor's degree.

Compilation on Student Success at Community Colleges (Inside Higher Ed)
Inside Higher Ed is pleased to release today The Quest for Student Success at Community Colleges, our latest compilation of articles.

The Right Fit (Inside Higher Ed)
The viability of women’s colleges is one of those evergreen topics in higher education that has again come to the forefront with the announcement that Sweet Briar College will be closing at the end of this academic year.

Union Rights at Religious College (Inside Higher Ed)
Scores of adjunct instructors walked out of class last week at Seattle University during National Adjunct Walkout Day, asking for -- among other things -- the right to count the ballots in their recent election whether to unionize.

All the News That's Fit to Teach (Inside Higher Ed)
Last month's announcement that The New York Times Company would launch an education initiatives may have had a familiar ring to it. The company has spent close to a decade trying to turn the newspaper’s vast institutional knowledge into knowledge higher education institutions and students want to buy.

Venting About Students: Punching Up or Down? (Inside Higher Ed)
Chronicle Vitae's “Dear Student” series, featuring snarky professor and TA retorts to common student requests for leniency, has garnered some push-back recently from professors and graduate instructors alike (folks like Jesse Stommel, Dexter Thomas, Dorothy Kim, and Kevin Gannon), who argue that public venting about miscreant students is unkind and inappropriate and discouraging to students, not to mention bad for morale.

David Glassman named Eastern's next president (Journal Gazette & Times-Courier)
CHARLESTON -- It's only 144 miles from Bradley University to Eastern Illinois University -- for David Glassman, it's a short drive to a big transition. Glassman was named the 12th official (11th sitting) president of EIU during a Board of Trustees meeting Monday. Glassman, who serves as provost at Bradley, will take over the presidency June 1.

Lake Land College may host Chinese delegation (Journal Gazette & Times-Courier)
MATTOON -- Lake Land College may host a delegation from a Chinese university this spring as part of efforts to start the college's first overseas workforce development program. Jim Hull, vice president for academic services at Lake Land, said representatives from Kaifeng University in China may visit the college's campus in late April.

Using robots, two-way mirrors and more in blended learning (The Hechinger Report)
Last week I interviewed a teacher who spoke to me through the body of a robot.

Is the biggest learning disability an emotional one? (The Hechinger Report)
http://hechingerreport.org/facing-hidden-learning-disability-students-emotions/ Neuropsychologist David Rose spent years helping kids with learning disabilities participate in school by creating digital textbooks with pop-up graphics, text-to-speech, flexible fonts and other customizable features to fit individual needs.

Guest View: PARCC test also a teaching tool (The Southern Illinoisan)
The majority of Illinois schools soon will begin administering a new test to third- through eighth-graders and some high school students.

Prior experience not a deal-breaker in SIU AD search (The Southern Illinoisan)
SIU's next athletic director must be familiar with the Missouri Valley Conference, but prior experience as an athletic director is not a prerequisite, according to Randy Dunn, SIU president.

March 3, 2015

Quote of the day:
"Our life is frittered away with detail. Simplify. Simplify."
Henry David Thoreau

Provost finalist says ISU at a crossroads (Bloomington Pantagraph)
Despite financial challenges ahead, a finalist for vice president of academic affairs and provost at Illinois State University said those challenges provide opportunities.

Chicago State, U. of I. land on 'worst of' list for campus free speech (Chicago Tribune)
The University of Illinois' rescinded job offer to a professor and a controversy over a faculty blog at Chicago State University helped land the two schools on a 2014 "worst of" list for student and faculty free speech rights..

In New York, a Prison Record Is a Barrier to College (Chronicle of Higher Education)
Adrien Cadwallader sat with a half-dozen campus officials and nervously confessed the low points of his troubled history: the 20 arrests and the drug addiction, followed by diagnoses of bipolar disorder and PTSD.

New Social Network Is All College, All the Time (Chronicle of Higher Education)
Once upon a time, Facebook was reserved for college students only. A new social network is trying to reboot that idea, with a college-only service called Friendsy.

Median Salaries of Senior College Administrators, 2014-15 (Chronicle of Higher Education)
For the second consecutive year, the rate of salary growth for senior administrators at public colleges outpaced that of their peers at private institutions, according to a survey released on Monday by the College and University Professional Association for Human Resources.

How 3 Colleges Made Tough Choices (Chronicle of Higher Education)
After its enrollment dropped below 700—with only 316 in the all-female undergraduate program—Wilson College, in Pennsylvania, took a big turn away from tradition.

Band-aid Solutions to College Deficits (Diverse Issues in Higher Education)
Now is the time of the year that most college and university boards of trustees meet to set in place what the comprehensive fee — tuition, fees, room and board — will be for next year.

Women As Writers (Diverse Issues in Higher Education)
“Weaving the Stories of Women’s Lives” is the theme this year of Women’s History Month, which is observed in March. This year is also the 35th anniversary of the Women’s History Movement and the National Women’s History Project, which promotes Women’s History Month.

Lincoln library event to celebrate women in Illinois history (Herald & Review)
Women's contributions to Illinois history will be featured at a free event at the Lincoln Presidential Library and Museum in Springfield.

Climbing the ladder (Herald & Review)
The students who gathered Monday for the Partners In Education Salute luncheon are among the tops in their class.

Are MOOCs Working for Us? (Part 2) (Inside Higher Ed)
This post is the second in a four-part series on MOOC research at Davidson College. We began with “why”, laying out the rationale for leading with a qualitative and residentially focused study.

Tales from a MOOC, Part 1 (Inside Higher Ed)
I’m currently taking a MOOC through Canvas on Blended Learning. I’ve been sitting on this particular piece for a while about my previous experience taking MOOCs.

David Glassman named Eastern's next president (Journal Gazette & Times-Courier)
It's only 144 miles from Bradley University to Eastern Illinois University -- for David Glassman, it's a short drive to a big transition.

AAUP reps visit campus (News-Gazette)
Representatives of the American Association of University Professors visited the University of Illinois on Friday as part of their investigation into the Steven Salaita case.

Group puts UI in top 10 'worst colleges for free speech' (News-Gazette)
The Steven Salaita saga has landed the University of Illinois on a list it probably would rather not make.

Take it from these ACT aces (News-Gazette)
With high school juniors jittery about the tough test awaiting them today, we asked five local geniuses who scored a perfect 36 on the ACT what last-minute advice they'd offer.

SIU alum gives advice for avoiding physician burnout (Springfield State Journal-Register)
An Atlanta surgeon who gave advice Monday to local medical students on ways of avoiding burnout once they become doctors said patients have reason to care about this growing problem. - See more at: http://www.sj-r.com/article/20150302/NEWS/150309893#sthash.WEyf9Y2Z.dpuf

More than 1M students scheduled to take PARCC test (Springfield State Journal-Register)
More than a million students are scheduled to take new standardized tests next week, despite concerns from Illinois' largest school district. - See more at: http://www.sj-r.com/article/20150303/NEWS/150309887#sthash.Mb8F4fho.dpuf

As a whole new kind of college emerges, critics fret over standards (The Hechinger Report)
At 56, Linda McCampbell discovered she could get the college degree she always wanted.

How an oversupply of PhDs could threaten American science (The Hechinger Report)
Gary McDowell spent four years working toward a PhD in oncology after earning undergraduate and master’s degrees in chemistry at the University of Cambridge.

Location, location, location: Are top universities too far away from low-income high school graduate (The Hechinger Report)
Almost 80 percent of high school graduates go to college nowadays.

Gaming the numbers? Conflicting college admissions messages confound parents and kids (The Hechinger Report)
A friend snapped photos of the colorful college brochures cramming his high school son’s mailbox and posted the pile on Facebook with a message that all but gushed, “Look which schools want us!”

March 2, 2015

Quote of the day:
“Sometimes your absence will teach what your presence can not.”
Unknown

Rauner appoints Madison County lawyer to SIU board (Belleville News-Democrat)
An attorney from Madison County has been appointed to serve on the board of trustees for Southern Illinois University. Read more here: http://www.bnd.com/2015/02/27/3683771/rauner-appoints-madison-county.html#storylink=cpy

SIUE names Enterprise Holdings leadership award winner (Belleville News-Democrat)
The Southern Illinois University Edwardsville School of Business named Edwardsville resident Joshua House as the recipient of the fall 2014 Enterprise Holdings Student Organization Leader of the Semester Award. Read more here: http://www.bnd.com/2015/02/25/3680177/siue-names-enterprise-holdings.html#storylink=cpy

Belleville West student heading to Washington (Belleville News-Democrat)
Emily Johansson of Belleville was one of two students from across the state chosen to be part of the group of 104 student delegates who will attend the 53rd annual United States Senate Youth Program in Washington, D.C. Read more here: http://www.bnd.com/2015/02/24/3678338/belleville-west-student-heading.html#storylink=cpy

If B.A.’s Can’t Lead Graduates to Jobs, Can Badges Do the Trick? (Chronicle of Higher Education)
Employers say they are sick of encountering new college graduates who lack job skills. And colleges are sick of hearing that their young alumni aren’t employable.

Survival at Stake (Chronicle of Higher Education)
In the aftermath of the recession, small colleges adapt to a new market

ECC board candidates talk tuition, taxes (Daily Herald)
Keeping taxes and college tuition low in the years ahead will be challenging, say candidates running for the Elgin Community College board April 7.

Community Colleges’ Role as MSIs Expanding (Diverse Issues in Higher Education)
Although they often operate at the margins, nearly 22 percent of the nation’s community colleges are minority-serving institutions and are responsible for enrolling about 55 percent of college-going minorities, according to a new report released by the Center for Minority Servings Institutions at the University of Pennsylvania.

Courts Backing Schools on Requirements of Student Professionalism (Diverse Issues in Higher Education)
Amir Al-Dabagh did well academically, publishing articles and winning a research award as a medical student at Case Western Reserve University.

Millikin class enriches Dennis students' reading experience (Herald & Review)
Blustery, single-digit weather does not make for a pleasant walk for small children, so Millikin University recently came to Dennis School.

Administrator Pay Up 2.4% (Inside Higher Ed)
The median base salary for senior leaders at colleges and universities has gone up 2.4 percent in 2014-15, the same as the year before.

Feds Fire 5 Debt Collectors (Inside Higher Ed)
The U.S. Department of Education said Friday it will end contracts with five companies that collect defaulted federal student loans after finding they made “materially inaccurate representations” to struggling borrowers.

Lawmakers honor SIU's Flying Salukis (The Southern Illinoisan)
Southern Illinois University’s aviation team was honored Thursday at the Illinois State Capitol.

Rauner names three to SIU Board of Trustees (The Southern Illinoisan)
A senior U.S. district judge, a lawyer and a Carbondale business owner have been named to the SIU Board of Trustees.

Plan would end SIU employee tuition waivers (The Southern Illinoisan)
A proposal to eliminate half-price tuition for the children of state university employees is drawing ire from SIU union representatives and university officials.

February 27, 2015

Quote of the day:
"Attitude is a little thing that makes a big difference."
Winston Churchill

Opinion: A true UIC class leader in every way but one (Chicago Sun-Times)
Mateo Uribe talked until his voice went hoarse on the campus of University of Illinois-Chicago earlier this year as he gathered signatures from classmates to run for student trustee.

Opinion: Gov. Rauner balances budget on backs of college kids (Chicago Sun-Times)
Gov. Bruce Rauner’s budget cuts are, on many arguments, necessary. The governor inherited a $1.618 billion deficit. Much of this deficit is the result of underfunding essential programs and additional borrowing to pay its bills. The state is bankrupt, having not adequately planned for pensions or otherwise managed the balance of revenue and expenditure.

The Ever-Growing World of College Rankings (Chronicle of Higher Education)
Another day, another college ranking. Or so it seems. Last year at least three new rankings emerged from national publications or major companies, joining a long line of magazines that have entered the rankings game since U.S. News & World Report started publishing its list annually, in 1985.

Harper College trustees increase tuition 2.8 percent (Daily Herald)
Starting this summer, Harper College full-time students will pay an extra $105 a year, or 2.8 percent, to attend the Palatine-based community college. The college's board of trustees in a 6-1 vote this week approved raising tuition $3.50 per credit hour from $110.25 to $113.75.

Critics: Fire Wise over diversity shortfall (News-Gazette)
CHAMPAIGN — Prompted by shrinking numbers of black students at the University of Illinois, some community activists are calling on trustees not to renew Chancellor Phyllis Wise's contract.

JWCC, WIU partnering for 'seamless' educational pipeline in supply chain management (Quincy Herald-Whig)
MOUNT STERLING, Ill. -- The idea is to build a seamless educational pipeline that could lead to a job in one of the growing areas of demand in industries across the region. Officials from John Wood Community College and Western Illinois University finalized a partnership Thursday that both feel will help strengthen the long-range economical picture of West-Central Illinois.

Financial Aid for Undocumented Students Is Losing Its Stigma (The New York Times)
For years, it was information shared only in whispers. Undocumented students, bright and educated, wanted to go to college, and a precious few universities were willing, very quietly, to help them pay for it.

Illinois Board of Higher Education recommends cutting NIU's state funding by less than 1 percent (The Northern Star)
The Illinois Board of Higher Education recommends NIU receive a .04 percent cut to its state allocation, which would drop that funding from $93,189.5 million to $93,155.1 million. The board's recommendation starkly contrasts a proposal from Gov. Bruce Rauner, who last week proposed NIU receive a state funding cut of $29.3 million to drop funding to about $64 million.

Lawmakers honor SIU's Flying Salukis (The Southern Illinoisan)
SPRINGFIELD — Southern Illinois University’s aviation team was honored Thursday at the Illinois State Capitol. The Flying Salukis are the national champions, again, as they won the National Intercollegiate Flying Association competition in May and were recognized with a resolution by the House of Representatives

Update: Rauner names three to SIU Board of Trustees (The Southern Illinoisan)
A senior U.S. district judge, a lawyer and a Carbondale business owner have been named to the SIU Board of Trustees. Gov. Bruce Rauner is scheduled to announce the appointments of U.S. District Judge J. Phil Gilbert, Edwardsville litigator Amy Sholar and Joel Sambursky early Friday morning.

Plan would end SIU employee tuition waivers (The Southern Illinoisan)
A proposal to eliminate half-price tuition for the children of state university employees is drawing ire from SIU union representatives and university officials. State Rep. Jack Franks, D-Marengo, is sponsoring House Bill 403, which would eliminate employee tuition waivers at all state schools

February 26, 2015

Quote of the day:
"When you show respect for yourself, it shows you have morals. When you show you have respect for others, it shows you have manners."
Ty Howard

Holocaust survivor, maker of 'pretty pictures' shows her tenacity (Bloomington Pantagraph)
With polka-dot socks peeking out from under her academic robes and an easy laugh — a laugh that brought many of her listeners along for the ride — Anita Lobel is not who or what you might expect.

73% of recession-era college students completed degrees in Illinois' public institutions: report (Chicago Sun-Times)
Illinois won impressive scores in a report to be published Tuesday on college-completion rates, ranking among only a dozen states where more than 70 percent of students at four-year public colleges and universities graduated during the height of the recession.

For Better or Worse, Universities Make Greater Use of Smaller Lab Animals (Chronicle of Higher Education)
First they helped save some chimpanzees and cats. Now they’re coming for the mice and the rats.

A Distinction Washington U. Wants to Lose: Least Economically Diverse (Chronicle of Higher Education)
Over the past several decades, Washington University in St. Louis has evolved from a locally oriented institution to one of national prominence.

Opening Up Admissions at a Rich Private College is Holden Thorp’s Latest Challenge (Chronicle of Higher Education)
Once the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s embattled chancellor, Mr. Thorp has spearheaded an effort to raise admission of low-income students as provost of Washington University in St. Louis. In a conversation, he reflects on that work and on Chapel Hill's fake-classes scandal, which blew up on his watch.

Program's Extra Support for Community-College Students Is Paying Off (Chronicle of Higher Education)
A program at City University of New York that surrounds full-time students with intensive financial, academic, and career support has nearly doubled the three-year graduation rate for community-college students who start out in remedial classes, according to a study released on Wednesday.

What this Obama library poll says—and doesn't say—about U of C's chances (Crain's Chicago Business)
In a possible sign that Chicago once again is the favorite to win the Barack Obama presidential library, the foundation that will develop the facility has commissioned a poll that indicates South Siders not only really want the library but are willing to give up public park land for it.

Obama Brings Hope to Undocumented Students (Diverse Issues in Higher Education)
When it comes to immigration, Julio Calderon hasn’t always agreed with President Obama and his administration’s policies.

House Votes to Expand College Accounts Obama Wanted to Scrap (Diverse Issues in Higher Education)
The House voted Wednesday to expand the benefits of popular college savings plans that President Barack Obama failed to scale back.

MOOCs: An Education in Diversity (Diverse Issues in Higher Education)
A biomedical engineer from Brazil, a copywriter from France and the business manager of a mining company in Senegal are talking.

Budget plan threatens ag education (Herald & Review)
National FFA Week has been around for 67 years and starts on the birthday of George Washington, a diligent and exemplary farmer and agriculturist in Virginia.

2 Law Schools Start Some Admissions Without LSAT (Inside Higher Ed)
The law schools of the State University of New York at Buffalo and the University of Iowa have announced that they will start accepting applications from some students without scores on the Law School Admission Test, Bloomberg reported.

Plan to Fail (Inside Higher Ed)
With tears in his eyes, Michael looked at me from across the table and asked for a second chance.

Updated: UI asks judge to dismiss Salaita's federal suit (News-Gazette)
URBANA — The University of Illinois has asked a federal judge to dismiss a lawsuit filed by Steven Salaita, arguing the controversial professor's claim to a job at the UI is unsubstantiated.

ISU receives works by English poet and novelist Graves (Springfield State Journal-Register)
A collection of works by celebrated English poet and novelist Robert Graves has been donated to Illinois State University's Milner Library. - See more at: http://www.sj-r.com/article/20150226/NEWS/150229574#sthash.LbgORuL9.dpuf

February 25, 2015

Quote of the day:
“I hear, and I forget. I see, and I remember. I do, and I understand.”
Chinese Proverb

Belleville West student heading to Washington (Belleville News-Democrat)
Emily Johansson of Belleville was one of two students from across the state chosen to be part of the group of 104 student delegates who will attend the 53rd annual United States Senate Youth Program in Washington, D.C. Read more here: http://www.bnd.com/2015/02/24/3678338/belleville-west-student-heading.html#storylink=cpy

Chancellor: SIUE enrollment up, but budget cuts a concern (Belleville News-Democrat)
Enrollment gains paint a rosy picture for Southern Illinois University Edwardsville’s future, but the state’s budget crisis looms as a serious problem, according to administrators. Read more here: http://www.bnd.com/2015/02/24/3678262/chancellor-siue-enrollment-up.html#storylink=cpy

The Friday Exit: engineering education that will 'unleash young people' (Chicago Tribune)
What kind of engineer does the world need? An entirely different one, says David Goldberg, who co-founded ShareThis at the University of Illinois.

No Child Left Behind 101: where lawmakers agree, disagree (Christian Science Monitor)
The No Child Left Behind Act is overdue for a rewrite. The House takes up floor debate on a mostly GOP version Wednesday, and Senate committee leaders are working toward crafting a bipartisan proposal.

As High-Tech Teaching Catches On, Students With Disabilities Can Be Left Behind (Chronicle of Higher Education)
Educational innovations like the flipped classroom, clickers, and online discussions can present difficulties for students with disabilities.

Chancellors Urge Congress to Ease Costly Rules on Colleges (Chronicle of Higher Education)
A pair of influential college chancellors asked Congress for regulatory relief on Tuesday, two weeks after they issued a report concluding that colleges are "enmeshed in a jungle of red tape."

Student Leaders Want Students on Sexual-Assault Panels (Chronicle of Higher Education)
A group of college student-government leaders is calling on the U.S. Department of Education to reverse its recommendation that students not serve on campus hearing panels that resolve cases of sexual assault.

The Dangerous Silence of Academic Researchers (Chronicle of Higher Education)
Three years ago, I was invited to testify before the New York City Board of Health about a proposed law to cap the portion size of sugary drinks served in restaurants.

Improving Teacher Preparation: Right Destination, Hazardous Route (Chronicle of Higher Education)
With high rates of retirement by an aging teaching force and continuing growth in school enrollments, we as a nation need more than ever to focus on how, where, and how well we prepare our future educators. Fortunately, the U.S. Department of Education has recognized the need to move on those issues.

Community Colleges After Michael Brown (Diverse Issues in Higher Education)
Since August—when Michael Brown was killed by police officer Darren Wilson—I’ve found myself engaging in a peculiar fantasy: What if Brown and Wilson had been students at my community college?

U.S. Senator Lamar Alexander: Federal Regulations Harmful to Universities (Diverse Issues in Higher Education)
U.S Senator Lamar Alexander (R-Tenn.), chairman of the Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions (HELP), said some federal regulations on education are draining universities of time and resources.

College Major a Factor in Unemployment Rates, Earnings (Diverse Issues in Higher Education)
Unemployment rates for most recent college graduates have declined since the Great Recession but not for those who majored in communications and journalism, according to a new report from the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce.

Creative Publishing and Critical Journalism (Inside Higher Ed)
Whenever young writers have asked for advice over the years, the only thing I could think to tell them was to practice saying, “Where’s my check?”

With Deregulatory Slant, A Higher Ed Act Push (Inside Higher Ed)
Senator Lamar Alexander on Tuesday committed to finishing a rewrite of the Higher Education Act by the end of this year as he backed a plan written by colleges and universities to roll back federal requirements on higher education.

Make‘em Pay? (Inside Higher Ed)
Community college folk often complain, when getting blamed for high remediation rates, that what’s really being measured is the performance of the local high schools. A state senator in Tennessee is proposing to base budgets on that.

Modest Use of FAFSA List (Inside Higher Ed)
Some moderately selective colleges seem to reduce financial aid to students who have indicated they might have their heart set on those colleges -- but the practice does not appear widespread, according to a new study of the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA.

Family Influence on Education (Inside Higher Ed)
Spending your teenage years in a single-parent family puts you at a larger educational disadvantage today than it did 40 years ago, claims a new study.

Second Call: GradHacker Seeks New Authors (Inside Higher Ed)
A reminder that GradHacker is now accepting applications from grad students who would like to join our team. We are looking to add to our roster in these two categories: Permanent Authors contribute at least one post a month on a topic relevant to graduate students. They also serve as rotating copy editor one month per year. Permanent authors are compensated in the form of Amazon gift cards—$20 per post, $50 for rotating editor duties.

Will Professors Teach Differently in 10 Years? (Inside Higher Ed)
Unfortunately, my guess is that the answer to this question is a sound “NO”.

Gender Bias in Student Evaluations (Inside Higher Ed)
College students tend to describe male faculty as “brilliant, awesome and knowledgeable.” While females are seen as “bossy and annoying, and beautiful or ugly.”

Lake Land's dual credit courses recruiting more students (Journal Gazette & Times-Courier)
Four years ago, Mattoon High School was not on Lake Land College's list of Dual Credit Program partner high schools with the most course offerings for students.

Response to EIU enrollment includes new outreach, technology (Journal Gazette & Times-Courier)
There was only one item on the agenda for the Feb. 3 Eastern Illinois University Board of Trustees Executive and Planning Committee meeting: an enrollment update.

IMPACT: College Enrollment Series (Journal Gazette & Times-Courier)
A six-part series exploring enrollment trends at Eastern Illinois University in Charleston and Lake Land College in Mattoon.

Cochlear implant leads to scholarship, study abroad (News-Gazette)
Sarah Johnson's partial deafness was discovered when she was 5 years old.

Tuition going up this June at Parkland (News-Gazette)
Parkland College students will pay more to go to school, beginning with the summer term that starts in June.

Culture association headquarters moving to NIU (Quad-City Times)
The Association for Black Culture Centers will move its headquarters to Northern Illinois University's DeKalb campus this July.

The best college majors if you actually want a job after graduation (Quincy Herald-Whig)
Wondering what to major in? If you're a college student wondering what you'll do after you graduate, it might be good to know that young workers with degrees in agriculture, mining, teaching and medicine are in high demand.

Prove it: How does blended learning look in a classroom? (The Hechinger Report)
There are plenty of snazzy online videos that feature people advocating for the use of technology in the nation’s schools.

As a whole new kind of college emerges, critics fret over standards (The Hechinger Report)
Competency education offers credit for experience, but who decides? Critics worry whether competency-based education is growing too fast for standards to be set.

Employment Rates Are Improving For Everyone But Journalism Majors (The Huffington Post)
We're back with your daily dose of depressing journalism news: unemployment rates are dropping for nearly all college majors, with the notable exception of journalism students.

OP-ED - How to Make College Cheaper (The New York Times)
THE soaring cost of college — a 1,225 percent increase since 1978, nearly twice the rate of the rise in health care costs — is such a problem for most families that politicians across the ideological spectrum are actually taking notice.

Luncheon will celebrate women, honor inclusivity (The Southern Illinoisan)
Southern Illinois University's annual “Celebrate Women: Honoring Inclusive Excellence” luncheon is a celebration, an awards presentation and a scholarship fundraiser rolled into one event.

JALC to hike tuition (The Southern Illinoisan)
The cost of attending John A. Logan College is about to go up.

What many have in common with Scott Walker: College credits, no degree (The Washington Post)
Much attention has been given in recent weeks to Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker’s decision to drop out of Marquette University in the spring of his senior year. The Republican presidential hopeful was just 34 credits short of earning a bachelor’s degree in 1990. He never went back.

These are the best college majors if you actually want a job after graduation (The Washington Post)
Wondering what to major in? If you're a college student wondering what you'll do after you graduate, it might be good to know that young workers with degrees in agriculture, mining, teaching and medicine are in high demand. So are those who studied physics or chemistry. But if you major in architecture or a social science, you might find it hard to get a job when you graduate.

As He Promotes It, Some Question Obama's Free Community College Idea (U.S. News & World Report)
Students, experts pick apart the pros and cons of the proposal meant to speed up degrees.

February 24, 2015

Quote of the day:
“Well done is better than well said.”
Benjamin Franklin

SIUE fire station to move away from underground utilities (Belleville News-Democrat)
The fire substation planned for the Southern Illinois University Edwardsville campus has at least eight slight problems: utility lines running underneath its proposed site. Read more here: http://www.bnd.com/2015/02/23/3676620_siue-fire-station-to-move-away.html?rh=1#storylink=cpy

Rauner appoints 2 to University of Illinois trustees board (Chicago Sun-Times)
Gov. Bruce Rauner has nominated two people to fill openings on the University of Illinois’ Board of Trustees. Rauner said in an early Tuesday news release that he has chosen Northern Trust vice president Ramon Cepeda and Jill Smart who is president of the National Academy of Human Resources.

Western Illinois University to eliminate 24 programs (Chicago Sun-Times)
MACOMB — The provost at Western Illinois University has presented a plan that would eliminate 24 university programs and review 17 others. The McDonough County Voice reports (http://bit.ly/1DKqdZ4 ) Provost Ken Hawkinson said Friday that the belt-tightening is needed due to challenging financial times.

COD official questioned why reserve fund is at $180 million (Chicago Tribune)
A Naperville homeowners group met with College of DuPage representatives Saturday during its monthly meeting and focused on finances and the college's healthy reserve fund..

Why Just Filling the Pipeline Won't Diversify STEM Fields (Chronicle of Higher Education)
As a chemistry major at Clark Atlanta University, Chloe N. Poston had her career path all mapped out.

State-by-State Breakdown of Graduation Rates (Chronicle of Higher Education)
According to a new study by the National Student Clearinghouse, the overall six-year completion rate for first-time, degree-seeking college students who first enrolled in 2008 was 55 percent.

Is Obama's ‘Pay as You Earn’ Plan Too Costly? (Chronicle of Higher Education)
The question looms over talks on how to expand the most generous student-loan repayment option

The Financial-Aid Fine Print (Chronicle of Higher Education)
Admissions counselors from any of the country’s wealthiest colleges would probably describe their financial aid in similar terms. Something like: “Yes, our price tag is really high, but we meet the full demonstrated need of all our students. If you get in here, we’ll make it affordable for you.”

Breuder: COD union's accusations are 'irresponsible and unfounded' (Daily Herald)
College of DuPage President Robert Breuder responded Monday to a teachers union report blasting his administration by releasing a 34-page document that accuses his critics of making "irresponsible and unfounded accusations."

College Major a Factor in Unemployment Rates, Earnings (Diverse Issues in Higher Education)
Unemployment rates for most recent college graduates have declined since the Great Recession but not for those who majored in communications and journalism, according to a new report from the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce.

Community Colleges After Michael Brown (Diverse Issues in Higher Education)
Since August—when Michael Brown was killed by police officer Darren Wilson—I’ve found myself engaging in a peculiar fantasy: What if Brown and Wilson had been students at my community college?

Higher education should monitor its students (Edwardsville Intelligencer)
mmigration is not only a political issue for the United States, but also one that has a far-reaching impact on higher education.

Millikin student wins Afghan sports honor (Herald & Review)
Millikin University sophomore Hasida Wali remembers a time in Afghanistan when females could barely leave the house, much less play sports.

No Easy A's (Inside Higher Ed)
Teachers make a tremendous difference, both in the lives of our children and the competitiveness and success of our country.

The Right FAFSA Reform (Inside Higher Ed)
Seemingly from the day it was created in 1992, the Free Application for Federal Student Aid, or FAFSA, has been a popular target for reform.

Corinthian ‘Debt Strike’ (Inside Higher Ed)
Since the chaotic dismantling of Corinthian Colleges first began last summer, a key issue has been whether the for-profit education company’s current and former students will have their loans forgiven.

The Ethics of Authorship: Is Ghostwriting Plagiarism? (Inside Higher Ed)
I have come out of my hiatus from this Sounding Board blog to respond to an anonymous question I received (and apologizes for how long it has taken).

State-Level Completion Data (Inside Higher Ed)
The National Student Clearinghouse Research Center this week released state-level student completion data.

DACC board considers tuition increase (News-Gazette)
Danville Area Community College students may see a small tuition increase later this year.

Rockford University president says he'll retire next summer (Quad-City Times)
Rockford University President Robert Head says he's retiring next summer.

JWCC dean to build on successes (Quincy Herald-Whig)
William Stuflick said his immediate challenge at John Wood Community College is a rather simple.

Western Illinois to eliminate 24 academic programs (Springfield State Journal-Register)
The provost at Western Illinois University has presented a plan that would eliminate 24 university programs and review 17 others. - See more at: http://www.sj-r.com/article/20150223/NEWS/150229797#sthash.cQuDmLGq.dpuf

Rauner appoints 2 to Universityof Illinois trustees board (Springfield State Journal-Register)
Gov. Bruce Rauner has nominated two people to fill openings on the University of Illinois' Board of Trustees. - See more at: http://www.sj-r.com/article/20150224/NEWS/150229747#sthash.U8X3bNPd.dpuf

Colleges appeal to Congress to cut regulations they say drive up costs (The Hechinger Report)
When letters of admission go out soon from colleges and universities to hopeful applicants, they’ll be quickly followed by offers of financial aid some advocates for students say require a college degree to understand.

Students are returning to for-profit colleges (The Hechinger Report)
Here’s a puzzle.

More Conflict Over Cutting Federal Role in Education (The New York Times)
As the House of Representatives prepared to take up a Republican proposal for the reauthorization of No Child Left Behind, Congress and the White House on Monday inched toward a confrontation over the federal role in education.

Luncheon will celebrate women, honor inclusivity (The Southern Illinoisan)
Southern Illinois University's annual “Celebrate Women: Honoring Inclusive Excellence” luncheon is a celebration, an awards presentation and a scholarship fundraiser rolled into one event.

February 23, 2015

Quote of the day:
“Open your arms to change, but don’t let go of your values.”
Dalai Lama

Nursing schools seek cure for shortage of educators (Bloomington Pantagraph)
With her advanced degrees, Amanda Hopkins could make a lot more money as a practicing nurse rather than as an assistant professor of nursing at Illinois Wesleyan University.

An Online Kingdom Come (Chronicle of Higher Education)
How Liberty U. became an unexpected model for the future of higher education

The Financial-Aid Fine Print (Chronicle of Higher Education)
Admissions counselors from any of the country’s wealthiest colleges would probably describe their financial aid in similar terms. Something like: “Yes, our price tag is really high, but we meet the full demonstrated need of all our students. If you get in here, we’ll make it affordable for you.”

Jill Biden: Community Colleges Are Vital (Diverse Issues in Higher Education)
Dr. Jill Biden, Second Lady of the United States, knows first-hand the difficulties faced by some community college students.

Smith Tapped as First African-American to Lead Swarthmore College (Diverse Issues in Higher Education)
The appointment of Dr. Valerie Smith as the 15th president of Swarthmore College is being hailed by scholars as a major breakthrough for African-American women in the Academy.

ISU nears accreditation finish with campus visit (Herald & Review)
A team from the Higher Learning Commission will visit the Illinois State University campus as it enters the final phases of the accreditation process.

Well-connected (Herald & Review)
Sparks are flying in the new welding lab at Richland Community College.

MAP awards may get more conditions (Herald & Review)
College graduates would have to repay money to the state if they accept state college assistance grants and then leave Illinois within five years of graduating.

Teaching Is Collaborative (Inside Higher Ed)
It’s easy for me to forget this sometimes, but teaching is collaborative.

No Easy A's (Inside Higher Ed)
Teachers make a tremendous difference, both in the lives of our children and the competitiveness and success of our country.

Blurring the Nonprofit/For-Profit Divide (Inside Higher Ed)
It used to be simple. For decades, providers of higher education were either nonprofit (the vast majority, public or private) or for-profit, sometimes massive, like the University of Phoenix, and more commonly the nearby business or trade school.

Completing the 'Student Life Cycle' (Inside Higher Ed)
Student success company Hobsons on Monday acquired Starfish Retention Solutions, bringing both companies closer to the goal of building college and career planning tools that track students as they move through elementary school, high school, college and beyond.

New rules floated for Illinois tuition grants (Quad-City Times)
College grads would have to repay money to the state if they accept state college assistance grants and then leave Illinois within five years of graduating.

ISU approves $3 million infacility improvements (Springfield State Journal-Register)
The Illinois State University Board of Trustees has approved nearly $3 million to improve campus facilities and systems. - See more at: http://www.sj-r.com/article/20150221/NEWS/150229866#sthash.ADeXpk0K.dpuf

The unexpected reason some in higher ed fear free community college (The Hechinger Report)
When the governor of Tennessee proposed letting students in that state go to community college for free — almost a year before President Barack Obama started pushing the idea nationally — a surprising worry flashed into Kina Mallard’s mind.

February 20, 2015

Quote of the day:
“Leadership is never an avenue to be self-serving but,a platform to render great service to people.”
Ifeanyi Enoch Onuoha

Maitlands honored at ISU Founders Day (Bloomington Pantagraph)
Former state Sen. John Maitland of Bloomington and his wife, Joanne, a former member of the Illinois State University Board of Trustees, were honored as “community treasures” during ISU's Founders Day celebration on Thursday.

A College Puts Students to Work, for Their Future and Its Own (Chronicle of Higher Education)
There’s something romantic about the work college, harking back to the medieval monasteries that lit the way for Western higher education.

All Students Should Receive Federal Money for College, Report Proposes (Chronicle of Higher Education)
This report is the first in what will be a series of policy recommendations on how best to break down barriers to higher education through changes in the federal student-aid system.

College of DuPage board freezes student tuition, fees (Daily Herald)
Tuition and fees will remain flat this fall at College of DuPage, despite calls from some who say costs for students should be reduced.

Diverse Conversations: Will Free Community College Help Minorities Succeed? (Diverse Issues in Higher Education)
President Barack Obama has spelled out a proposal that would offer two years of community college tuition free to any student who wanted to take advantage of it.

Teaching the Global 1% (Inside Higher Ed)
Charged €1,000 ($1,140) for damage to two rooms and the destruction of another family’s possessions, Mohammed giggled and explained, “No problem, I buy them.”

Upping the Ante on Free (Inside Higher Ed)
Senator Bernie Sanders is calling for a massive boost in federal higher education spending that would cut college tuition at public colleges and universities in half.

'The Pulse': Bryan Alexander and Higher Ed's Future (Inside Higher Ed)
This month's edition of "The Pulse" podcast features an interview with Bryan Alexander, senior researcher for the New Media Consortium and a prolific speaker and writer.

Do We Need Undergraduate Student Affairs Programs? (Inside Higher Ed)
When I started out in higher education, I wanted to be a physical therapist. My first year of coursework at Indian Hills Community College was everything that a budding pre-health student required.

Fraternity Sues Wesleyan for Coeducation Requirement (Inside Higher Ed)
The Wesleyan University chapter of Delta Kappa Epsilon is suing the university for "discrimination, misrepresentation and deceptive practices," for the order by Wesleyan stating that its fraternities must become coeducational in September.

$209 million 'significant hit' to UI's funding (News-Gazette)
The University of Illinois goes through a lot of money in a year — more than $5 billion, in fact.

Caterpillar opens lab at UI research park (News-Gazette)
The head of the University of Illinois Research Park said to have new companies join the park and to have others expand their operations is a big part of the park's success and an important part of its future.

QU's science program seeing a surge in student interest (Quincy Herald-Whig)
Quincy University has been making inroads in preparing students for future careers in science, technology, engineering and math.

Illinois College students protesttextbook rental mandate (Springfield State Journal-Register)
An estimated 200 students on Thursday protested an upcoming textbook policy change at Illinois College. - See more at: http://www.sj-r.com/article/20150219/NEWS/150219374#sthash.LUjzuD9U.dpuf

Ex-college employee accused ofstealing from radio station (Springfield State Journal-Register)
A former College of DuPage employee is accused of stealing more than $200,000 from the campus radio station. - See more at: http://www.sj-r.com/article/20150220/NEWS/150229972#sthash.EgAwCSOR.dpuf

A Bid for Guns on Campuses to Deter Rape (The New York Times)
As gun rights advocates push to legalize firearms on college campuses, an argument is taking shape: Arming female students will help reduce sexual assaults.

February 19, 2015

Quote of the day:
"It's a tough job to tell a story when the audience already knows the ending, and the ending is bleak."
Walter Jon Williams

SWIC president: Community colleges not targets of governor’s budget axe (Belleville News-Democrat)
Southwestern Illinois College president Georgia Costello said Wednesday that it seems community colleges will largely avoid the governor’s budget ax. “The proposed flat funding for community colleges and Monetary Award Program grants is welcome news, particularly for our students, who need affordable education,” Costello said in reaction to Gov. Bruce Rauner’s budget proposal announced earlier Wednesday

ISU president shocked by size of proposed budget cut (Bloomington Pantagraph)
Wednesday's first budget address by Gov. Bruce Rauner brought mixed tidings for McLean County schools.

Chipotle CFO headlines ISU Business Week (Bloomington Pantagraph)
An Illinois State University graduate who is a top executive at Chipotle Mexican Grill will be the keynote speaker and seven new members will be inducted into the College of Business Hall of Fame during ISU's Business Week 2015, which starts Monday.

Illinois university leaders decry Rauner's state funding cut proposal (Chicago Sun-Times)
Leaders of two state universities said Gov. Bruce Rauner’s proposed higher-education budget cut would slash their state funding by nearly one-third and do great harm to students and to Illinois residents.

Elgin Community College selected for National Scholarship Program:.. (Chicago Tribune)
Achieving the Dream, Inc. and OneMain Financial today announced the selection of Elgin Community College as one of five community colleges selected for the OneMain Financial Completion Scholarship Program, a national effort to help low-income community college students get to the finish line and earn a certificate or degree. .

How One Campus United Behind a Budget-Cutting Effort (Chronicle of Higher Education)
A heavy dependence on tuition dollars means, for many colleges, keeping the cost for students as low as possible, to maintain enrollment.

What's Wrong With Public Intellectuals? (Chronicle of Higher Education)
For years, the undigitized gem of American journals had been Partisan Review.

Unions Need to Step Up for Equality (Chronicle of Higher Education)
Last fall an adjunct professor, who wishes to remain anonymous, created a Facebook page titled "National Adjunct Walkout Day" and posted the following: "On February 25, 2015, adjuncts across the country will come together to insist on fair wages and better working conditions."

My Betty Friedan Moment (Chronicle of Higher Education)
I write this on the anniversary of Betty Friedan’s birth and her death.

10-year freeze on teacher salaries to fix state budget? (Daily Herald)
If the Illinois Supreme Court strikes down a law trying to cut teachers' and state workers' pension benefits, those employees won't necessarily be able to breathe a sigh of relief, state Sen. Matt Murphy says.

Barickman joins education funding reform effort (Herald & Review)
An effort to change how Illinois funds its public schools has bipartisan support.

What Was Your Proudest Teaching Moment? (Inside Higher Ed)
What was your proudest teaching moment?

Feedback on Ratings, Round 3 (Inside Higher Ed)
From the moment President Obama called for a federal college ratings system some 18 months ago, colleges and universities have criticized the idea and lobbied against it.

A Good Idea, Not a New One (Inside Higher Ed)
“The time has come to make education through the 14th grade available in the same way that high school education is now available.

Cheating or Collaboration? (Inside Higher Ed)
The computer science department at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, seeking a balance between promoting student collaboration and fostering individual academic achievement, will continue to let students share their work online.

A New Call for 'College for All' (Inside Higher Ed)
The Center for American Progress is today releasing a new paper on how to provide, as the paper's title says, "College for All."

Illinois Governor Seeks Nearly $387M in Higher Ed Cuts (Inside Higher Ed)
Illinois's new governor, Bruce Rauner, this week proposed a $387 million cut to the state's higher education budget. About $209 million of that will come from the University of Illinois -- that's nearly one-third of the system's state subsidy.

A Powerful Word (Inside Higher Ed)
An experiment was conducted a few years back that offered participants the choice between a Lindt chocolate truffle and a Hershey’s Kiss.

New York Times Launches Online Education Initiative (Inside Higher Ed)
The New York Times and CIG Education Group on Wednesday announced the media organization's latest ed-tech initiative: NYT EDUcation, an online platform that will offer everything from college preparatory courses to continuing education for adult learners.

Path to the Prospectus (Inside Higher Ed)
Last quarter, after surviving coursework, qualifying exams, and the dissertation proposal, at long last, I arrived at the glorious land of being ABD. Along the way, I’ve taken advantage of many of the strategies suggested here on GradHacker, and have found the archive of advice and reflections very helpful.

Rauner budget would mean UI loses a third of state funding (News-Gazette)
URBANA — The University of Illinois would lose almost a third of its state funding, and employees would see future pension benefits reduced, under budget proposals outlined by Gov. Bruce Rauner.

Here's the PITCH (News-Gazette)
The classroom on the north side of the University of Illinois Armory might be small but big sounds come from it three nights a week.

'The Sparrow' is debut performance for Parkland's black-box theater (News-Gazette)
The play "The Sparrow" tells the story of Emily Book, a shy teenage girl who returns to her small town 10 years after a tragic accident.

Jim Dey: Ex-Northwestern prof's work prompts $40 million suit (News-Gazette)
The Sword of Damocles that's been hanging over the heads of top officials at Northwestern University finally fell this week.

Bradley gargoyles (Peoria Journal Star)
Since the early days of Bradley University, gargoyles have been a fixture amid campus architecture.

Top Peace Corps schools include 5 in Illinois (Quad-City Times)
The Peace Corps says five Illinois colleges are on an annual list of top volunteer-producing schools.

Rauner proposes cuts, pension changes to save money inbudget address (Springfield State Journal-Register)
Calling it "our last best chance to get our house in order," Gov. Bruce Rauner outlined a state budget Wednesday that calls for no tax increases but steep cuts to a wide range of programs, particularly in human services. - See more at: http://www.sj-r.com/article/20150218/NEWS/150219498#sthash.wUX3J5gg.dpuf

Five Illinois colleges on list of top Peace Corps schools (Springfield State Journal-Register)
The Peace Corps says five Illinois colleges are on an annual list of top volunteer-producing schools. - See more at: http://www.sj-r.com/article/20150219/NEWS/150219422#sthash.MeLkXWaM.dpuf

Rauner budget proposal would cut SIU by $62 million (The Southern Illinoisan)
SIU President Randy Dunn said he plans to spend the next few months telling the story of the university system -- back home and in the state capital.

Current News Digest | NewsWeekly

Disclaimer: Some links in this digest require subscriptions or registration. Links sometimes expire quickly, so downloading articles expeditiously is important. Each daily digest will be archived for one week on this site.

Copyright 2015

Footer